Will i9-9900 Give Better Experience Than Ryzen 3200g...?

Regev

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....for someone who only works with text (mega-long documents, many tabs open simultaneously on the browser, spreadsheets, managing and creating websites, etc etc). Zero gaming. Zero video editing. Photo editing? Maybe a little bit - just to give some vibrance to my travel photos :) Maybe I'll get back to do some basic programming again, nothing crazy.

In those cases, will I see a difference (especially in the heavy, day-to-day text/browser use) between the 3200g to the i9 9900 ? Is it 0%? 5%? 25%? :) If it makes me even 1% more productive then it's worth the price for me, I'm just not sure if it will affect anything at all.

Reason I'm asking. The 3200g will cost me about $100. The i9 9900 I can get for $265 (massive discount) through my uncle who works for Intel.

But will that power really help in any way?

Thanks
 


Regev

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Hey, thanks.
These are synthetic tests, I'm talking real-world usage difference. Will the 3200g be a bottleneck in any of those applications? Will the i9 load faster and let me finish things quicker or is the 3200g enough to max out the speeds anyway and give the same practical operation?
 

Regev

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These are 188k (in fact 2k for the 9900, not the K version) running UserBenchmark's software to measure CPU speeds. But it tells me nothing really on real, day-to-day activities (for my kind of use). For example if you measure the i3 and the i9 on 4K gaming, there's going to be about 10% difference in FPS, yet in synthetic tests it would show "XYZ% stronger!". is the i9 really going to make heavy web browsing, text editing, spreadsheet creation, WordPress operation, etc (all simultaneously) faster than the 3200g?
 

jglen490

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When it comes to comparison testing of PC components, no one test or even set of tests is going to replicate everyone's "real world" experience. That's why they are called "benchmark" tests. They run the same test against the components being compared and provide answers. Benchmarking does not test any one person's unique needs, instead they provide a way to rationally compare components by running common workloads and transactions, and provide results. They are objective, not subjective. They get you to the ballpark, you make the play.

If you are looking for a Linux performance opinion, go with the i9 over the Ryzen. The platform with a 3200 in general runs Linux just fine - mostly. The platform with an i9 also runs Linux just fine. I would be searching more for problem reports than performance reports between the two, with the totality of a system; MB, CPU, RAM, video, audio components.

Bottom line, it sounds to me like you have already made up your mind - that's what you should go with.
 


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