Why human computer interaction in Linux is the worse for the very beginning users compare to Windows and MacOS

laiduy98

New Member
Hi everyone,

Today I want to talk a little bit about the UI in Linux and indicate how bad the experience for beginning as well as why Linux should improve a lots to approach general users. I have used Linux for 4 years now, and I just realize the reason why Linux is only have around 2, 3% of market share despite the fact that it is free, secure and really customizable.

Reason 1:
I saw a question on AskUbuntu today said that “Why it is so hard to install apps in Linux ?”, and the question has downvotes. People are trying to say how great package manager is, how can we can just type a line in the terminal and everything is done.

Well, it is.
And it is not.

Why?
OK let’s see the procedure how my sister install and uninstall apps in Windows and Mac and Linux

I will not talk about the software center here because all 3 have it and have the same problem that all 3 do not have all apps.

Windows: all she needs to know is executable file is .exe
Install: Go to browser download the program with .exe file, double click it and next, next, done.
Uninstall: Right click the app in the app list in start menu, click uninstall.

Mac: all she needs to know is executable file is .pkg
Install:Go to browser download the program with .pkg, double click and drag it to Applications folder.
Uninstall: drag the app to trash can.

She nearly don’t need to learn anything to do that.

Linux: She has to learn, a lots.
Install: The terminal. What is the terminal ? What distro are you use? Ubuntu ? You just sudo apt install “something”. What exactly “something”? You don’t know. You do apt search something.

It lists a very long text that she does not know what going on at all.
Finally install by .deb. It pretty the same with Windows and Mac. But the app she needs is not in .deb. It is in .tar.gz. :D
Some apps is in .sh and you have to open terminal and ./something.
Some apps is in .AppImage.

Uninstall: sudo apt remove something, right ?
NO. It is only remove 1 main package. 3000 dependency packages still there. And she have to “learn”. Also, sudo apt auto remove.
Even that, not all package can be uninstall within package manager. If you install by extract .tar.gz, or .sh you have to delete it manually.
Now you know what happen to Linux.
Package manager is fast, for experience user. But it is not user friendly. It is great, but it is also the worse way to install apps, depends on which type of users.

Reason 2:
She have to go to ask in some forum, and pretty sure that she got a downvote.

Reason 3:
Lack of hardware support.
If your laptop is just release with something new, it might not work in linux.
I have get through that with rtl8822be in 16.04.

Reason 4:
Lack of application. You can say that you can find alternatives. But people do not want. They want to use Adobe Photoshop, MS Office, play games, etc.

Reason 5:
If you are using Gnome on Xorg, I can sure that it is laggy. However, most of the great distro is using Gnome as default.

So the main reason I think is that install software experience is the major effect. If Linux can make the installation process as easy as Windows and Mac, It could be a turn.
 
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arochester

Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
This is silly.

People have to spend time to learn Windows and they have to spend time to learn MacOS.

People expect Linux to be like Windows and MacOS. Is Windows like MacOS? Is MacOS like Windows? They expect to use Linux immediately without any learning whatsoever because they know Windows. Linux is not Windows. Windows is not Linux.

I have used Linux for 4 years now, and I just realize the reason why Linux is only have around 2, 3% of market share despite the fact that it is free, secure and really customizable.
Why do you use Linux then? Why not go back to the "superior" Windows and MacOS?

There is an acronym - FUD. This is not FUD? https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/F/FUD.html

Heard of Synaptic? Heard of Gdebi?

Adobe Photoshop? https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/install-adobe-photoshop-linux/
MS Office? https://www.howtogeek.com/171565/how-to-install-microsoft-office-on-linux/
Games? ... Steam?... Lutris?

These are Windows apps. (1) Why not run them on Windows? (2) Are the copies genuine and paid for?

People can use Linux AND other OSs without affecting each other. You can have both.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
Windows: all she needs to know is executable file is .exe
Install: Go to browser download the program with .exe file, double click it and next, next, done.
Uninstall: Right click the app in the app list in start menu, click uninstall.
How nice and simple.
And naive.
You appear to have forgotten finding the exe file.....making sure it is not riddled with spyware, malware, backdoor etc etc etc.....then click, click and all of that crap is now present on your pc
Uninstall ?...as you said simple.
Now you can figure out how to 'uninstall' all the unintended crap that has just made your win 10 slow to a crawl.......and has also been responsible for sending all of your info to som,e equally simple clown who will do with it as he/she pleases.

As stated in the post above......this is silly....naive,...and so far from reality and the real truth as to make me wonder why the Moderating team should not remove it.
 

JulienCC

Active Member
This kind of topic is a troll trap. But since it's posted here lets take some height.

Why, in a world where computers are so widespread, used, people still want computer to work like they were designed for unexperienced 3 years old kids ?
We learn to walk, we learn to read, we learn to write, we learn to drive, but hey computers shouldn't require any adaptation right ?

This is bothering me everyday : I see people whose job is to handle data and they are still stuck with https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WYSIWYG types of programs. The spend their days moving data across spreadsheet and cant even take the time to learn some python kungfu to do their job in 3 lines of code and a click.

So yes, it takes some time to learn how to write a simple python program. Probably weeks before you have enough skills to do something usefull. But guess what ? You are going to use computers for you whole life. Spending this time will free you days of work with dumb tools.

That being said, you shouldn't think that "linux people can't take criticism". Linux is not ONE thing, ONE community. Linux is a kernel. You don't even see the kernel when you use an operating system. You only see what have been put on top of it.

If you want to compare something to Windows or MacOS, compare a distribution. You can say "Ubuntu is less [INSERT CRITICISM HERE] than Windows". That's OK. You can say "Linux Mint is total bullsh*t compared to MacOS", thats OK.
But there is no such thing as comparing a full working environment to a single component.

Simply use a search engine and type "Linux distributions that looks like Windows" and you will discover a whole new world.

Since linux is part of an ecosystem that is free, which stands for freedom and not only grauity, people who don't like a part of the ecosystem are free to change it. And there are many, many people actually tuning the ecosystem to make it look and feel like they want.

Try more linux distros. You tried ubuntu, it didn't please you. Try something else, there must be a flavor that fits your taste out there.
 

laiduy98

New Member
This kind of topic is a troll trap. But since it's posted here lets take some height.

Why, in a world where computers are so widespread, used, people still want computer to work like they were designed for unexperienced 3 years old kids ?
We learn to walk, we learn to read, we learn to write, we learn to drive, but hey computers shouldn't require any adaptation right ?

This is bothering me everyday : I see people whose job is to handle data and they are still stuck with https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WYSIWYG types of programs. The spend their days moving data across spreadsheet and cant even take the time to learn some python kungfu to do their job in 3 lines of code and a click.

So yes, it takes some time to learn how to write a simple python program. Probably weeks before you have enough skills to do something usefull. But guess what ? You are going to use computers for you whole life. Spending this time will free you days of work with dumb tools.

That being said, you shouldn't think that "linux people can't take criticism". Linux is not ONE thing, ONE community. Linux is a kernel. You don't even see the kernel when you use an operating system. You only see what have been put on top of it.

If you want to compare something to Windows or MacOS, compare a distribution. You can say "Ubuntu is less [INSERT CRITICISM HERE] than Windows". That's OK. You can say "Linux Mint is total bullsh*t compared to MacOS", thats OK.
But there is no such thing as comparing a full working environment to a single component.

Simply use a search engine and type "Linux distributions that looks like Windows" and you will discover a whole new world.

Since linux is part of an ecosystem that is free, which stands for freedom and not only grauity, people who don't like a part of the ecosystem are free to change it. And there are many, many people actually tuning the ecosystem to make it look and feel like they want.

Try more linux distros. You tried ubuntu, it didn't please you. Try something else, there must be a flavor that fits your taste out there.
Thank you for your reply, I am appreciate that.

All I want is to make Linux more and more user friendly because I love Linux. I want to make it as more user can use as possible, However I still have to indicate that what you are thinking right now is exactly what experienced users think. I used to think like that. I have tried it all. Debian, Arch, Fedora, etc you name it. Facing with crappy Nvidia drivers on Optimus laptop, tried tons of DE: Gnome, KDE, XFCE, Cinnamon or even windows manager only like I3. They all have to face the same problems. So i am pretty sure that I called "Linux" is correct.

Do you know why computer now evolved to GUI instead of only CLI ? It is because people are lazy. It is the human nature. They want to learn as little as possible and that exactly what general users is. As I just said, if this is that perfect, Linux should get the largest market share. You, me, we want to learn because we love it. I love Linux, you love Linux. If every one is happy to learn everything so you and me still gonna use CLI to type this right now.

End user, they don't know and don't want to know. They want the system that they can learn it them self without reading to much the docs or asking another people. For example an accountant all she needs is to master her excel skill, rather than how an OS works.

Linux and all of its distro is maintain freely and because the whole ecosystem do not have the motivation to fit the taste of as many user as possible, It leads to the fact that they do not care much about very basic users

Why do you use Linux then? Why not go back to the "superior" Windows and MacOS?
because I love it and i want it can be accessible with more and more people, which is general users.

You appear to have forgotten finding the exe file.....making sure it is not riddled with spyware, malware, backdoor etc etc etc.....then click, click and all of that crap is now present on your pc
Uninstall ?...as you said simple.
You are pointing at security, and I am talking about how to make general users feel comfortable when contact with their machine. Also, you are point all hate you have to Windows. How about MacOS?
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Active Member
She nearly don’t need to learn anything to do that.
Actually she did have to learn how to do it.
As for Linux it is easy to learn as it was as easy to learn Vindow and Mac doing it.
How do I know that they are all easy to use as it is far easier to learn to use a desktop environment than it is to learn a purely command line operating system. This I know because when I was still at school computers took up a whole room because of the valve technology and we use to talk about Fortran and other programming languages by the time I left school they had shrunk some what but were still bigger than the PC's of the late 70's before chip technology shrunk them even further. Yeah! I played around with old 8086 based computers where you had to create the programs yourself.
It was the Command Line environment that held me back from ditching Vindows and moving to that operating system in the late 90's the early decade of this century. But since the Linux community developed the Desktop Environments that all changed. I have had Linux mint installed for nearly two months and find it is just as easy for this old fella learn as it was to learn Vindows as the DE is very reminiscent of Vindows 3.1 blended with other of variants of the Vindows DE.

Install: Go to browser download the program with .exe file, double click it and next, next, done.
All I do is go and update my Packet Manager go to my Software Manager ensure that it is up to date and browse and mark the packets I want installed and install them.
Since the packets come from reputable and reliable sources so they are clean and free from malware and viruses.
What is so hard about that.

4643



the reason why Linux is only have around 2, 3%
The reason that Linux has only around the 2 - 3% of the market both Apple and Microsoft had a kind of a head start to begin with.
Secondly Microsoft buddied up with Intel and when PC's were installed with an Intel processor they were automatically loaded with a version of Vindows so you basically had very, very little choice in which operating system you used. As Apple was also releasing its own operating system to be used on IBM clone PC's besides putting it in their own fully integrated PC's.
It has taken for awhile for the Linux community to begin releasing DE's as it takes time for something to be created by a community as there are many people contributing to its creation and deciding what goes in to the program to make it run properly, not just a small group creating and what goes into the program is decided by one person.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Active Member
How about MacOS?
Well for this old Black Fella the only reason that I do not own a Mac is their flaming bloody price well outside my budget.
They use to release their OS for using in IBM clone PC's, which I was considering once but at the time was not high on my agenda of life.
I have used a Mac OS in junction with my work in keep my Flight supplied with the materials required to carry out its operations in maintaining live teaching aids (aircraft and ground support units) and office supplies for the instructors.
But they also suffer the same down side as Microsoft namely profits before customers.
 

JulienCC

Active Member
I acknowledge that drivers can be a hell in linux, but to be clear : it's manufacturer's fault.

I have so many people arround me that are unable to install anything on their Windows machine. When they try they end up clicking on the wrong download button which is a fake one that downloads a malware... This is a true and common story. As I am the "computer guy" in my neighborhood I can really tell you that the only thing that make Windows user-friendly is having people like me arround.

When it comes to bugs, you should check at Windows 10 updates on dedicated forums. Hundred pages of people unable to boot... It can also be a hell.

You talked about the market shares. I must tell you that most people don't choose Windows. They buy a computer, Windows is installed on it, they keep it. They won't reinstall Windows to have a clean install : no. They use what have been delivered. Deliver Ubuntu instead of Windows and just like so many people hate Windows, you will have many people hating Ubuntu. Like you said it's the human nature. Most people have to use a computer, they don't want to, they have to, and this kind of logic turns anything nice into a burden.

One of the reasons behind the market share of Windows is the fact that people pay for it, even if they don't know about it. They pay, so the company has money to pay people to push manufacturers toward their system...

And I reiterate : you are talking about some distributions, not Linux. Android is Linux, most people like Android. You listed a few vanilla distributions. RedHat, Debian, Arch... those are for the bravest of us. A casual user should go to distros like Chalet OS or any of the thousands other arround that deliver a simplistic UX. Ofcourse you will hardly find them since they can't afford ads on TV.

You are talking about a lot of different things and we could elaborate on each one for hours. The time I spent to write these few answers I could have spent it improving the patch of a KDE image viewer that I made upon the request of an user here. This is the way you can improve "linux".
If you have something specific to say about something (a feature missing, something that seems counterintuitive), find the project that is behind it and submit a feature request or a bug report. This is the way it works. You won't improve anything by saying "Windows is better than Linux for reasons".

To be more specific : you said an app you needed was delivered in a tgz instead of .deb file. Tell the owner of the project to provide a .deb file. Even better : tell him to provide the .deb file in the official repo of a big distro.

You want .deb files to be handled as applications and not archives when double clicking on it ? Get the name of the file browser you were using (there are many out there) and tell it's dev team you want this feature.

You don't want to use a terminal to handle installation ? You can already use a program with GUI, there is one shipped with most distros. If you didn't find that program easily enough, report it to the desktop environment project.

You want dependencies to be removed automatically ? Tell the maintainer of the program installer that you want "apt autoremove" to be triggered by default.

You want your hardware to work out of the box ? Install the latest version of the system or upgrade it. Actually you can simply update your kernel, like you would update/install a driver in windows. If it's not working properly you can always contact your hardware manufacturer and tell them that its a shame they don't provide drivers for linux.

You want your favorite games and apps to work on linux ? Reach their companies and tell them to release a linux port of their software.

Your Gnome environment was laggy ? Submit a bug report.

This is the way you should go when you are free. There is no point in telling your lord that you don't like his kingdom : there is no lord here.
 

dos2unix

Active Member
In many cases Linux graphics out-perform even Windows for gaming.


These tests were done with Xorg, some newer benchmarks show Wayland being even faster.

Gimp does everything photoshop does. Better yet, it's free and I don't have to run the latest version as a thin client from a cloud based application.

LibreOffice and OpenOffice do everything MS Office does. These are about 99% compatible with Microsoft anyway. I can load, read, edit and save MS Word, Excel, Powerpoint, and Visio documents on Linux. Most people don't even realize these documents were created or edited on Linux.

Newer versions of Ubuntu, Mint, Mandriva and Fedora are just as easy (if not easier) than installing Windows.

Linux wasn't originally developed as a desktop OS. It was designed as server OS. It is called "UNIX like". You want to talk about market share? Windows may own the consumer desktop, but Linux owns the server market (by an even larger margin than windows on the desktop).
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Active Member
It is because people are lazy. It is the human nature.
Good Old Sam beat you to the punch on that
Mankind have a great aversion to intellectual labour, but even supposing knowledge to be easily attainable, more people would be content to be ignorant than would take even a little trouble to acquire it. – Samuel Johnson (1709 – 1784)
 

ChrisOfBristol

New Member
Linux should improve a lots to approach general users
I agree with you - and I am a huge fan of Linux, not a troll. I have been using various distributions over more than a decade.

I have found that there are two practical ways of installing a package 1) use the package manager 2) find a suitable package file for my current distribution (in my case a .deb file), download and click on it. A new user might not realise that an .rpm won't work, or that they need something else installed to use a Snap or Flatpak.

Other methods will waste my time as they probably won't work: .tar.gz followed by ./install.sh and certainly anything that requires a compiler. Why? There are many reasons - missing menu entry, missing icon - relatively simple problems, and many more complex ones. Compilation won't work as I probably haven't even got a compiler installed. It's certainly not reasonable to expect a new user to do battle with that sort of thing.

Nowadays if I can't find the package I want using 1) or 2) I'll just choose a different package. It might not be the best but at least I can start using it instead of wasting time fixing it.

I think expert users are often unable to see things from a less competent user's point of view. It's probably unwise to suggest anything other than 1) or 2) - as someone mentioned above, even "open a terminal" could be enough to put someone off - and probably rightly too, as I have frequently typed in commands I didn't understand (maybe foolish - but when desperate) only to find they didn't work because of a typo in the "help" I was given.
 
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Vrai

Active Member
This is silly.

People have to spend time to learn Windows and they have to spend time to learn MacOS.

People expect Linux to be like Windows and MacOS. Is Windows like MacOS? Is MacOS like Windows? They expect to use Linux immediately without any learning whatsoever because they know Windows. Linux is not Windows. Windows is not Linux.



Why do you use Linux then? Why not go back to the "superior" Windows and MacOS?

There is an acronym - FUD. This is not FUD? https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/F/FUD.html

Heard of Synaptic? Heard of Gdebi?

Adobe Photoshop? https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/install-adobe-photoshop-linux/
MS Office? https://www.howtogeek.com/171565/how-to-install-microsoft-office-on-linux/
Games? ... Steam?... Lutris?

These are Windows apps. (1) Why not run them on Windows? (2) Are the copies genuine and paid for?

People can use Linux AND other OSs without affecting each other. You can have both.
I must respectfully disagree. Maybe the OP is 'trolling' but it did not read that way to me. I think the OP raised some good and valid issues. The reply offered reads somewhat 'snarky' and sarcastic to me.

I've been running 'Linux' for 15 years and I understand exactly what the OP was trying to point out.

Read this blog post by someone who is most certainly not a 'troll' but raises some interesting points akin to the OP.
Linux Dying In Dependency Hell
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
If a new Linux user learns a little bit of pre Linux how to than all of this would be explained prior to even installing Linux.

A new Linux user must be willing and have the desire to learn a little pre Linux how to and knowledge to have a good first Linux experience.

If unwilling to seek this minor pre Linux how to than yes a bad first Linux experience is inevitable.
 

dos2unix

Active Member
Windows has it's own share of problems and dependencies.

Windows update hasn't been doing so great the last couple of months. It broke a few million windows computers. (Do a google search for windows 10 updates breaking). The fix for this broke even more than the original failure.

Installing windows can be an adventure. I have to reboot 4 times just to get all the security updates.
Then 4 more times for the office updates. Oh yeah, I had to install .NET 3, then .NET4, then 3 other versions. Oh, yeah I have to install Java. Oh yeah flash doesn't work anymore.

Linux distro's may be different... rpms may be different than deb files. KDE may be different than Gnome or Mate.

Windows 3.1 was different from windows 95, that was different from Vista, that was different from Windows98, that was different from Windows 7, then we had windows 8, (no windows 9 )
Now we have windows 10, with msi's, or exe's. Oh yeah we have the registry nightmare.
Then we have permissions problems on c:\windows\system32\ when I get added to a AD domain.

First we had DOS, then we have Powershell, syntax's change.

The learning curve for Windows is no easier than Linux. It's just what people are more used to.
=======================================
The MAC is better. But it's also $$$$. Mac OS 4, 5 6, and 7 only ran on Mototrola 68K processors, and then IBM RSC PowerPC processors. Now we are on Intel and we run brew. (MacOS is really based on BSD anyway).
 

JulienCC

Active Member
I must respectfully disagree. Maybe the OP is 'trolling' but it did not read that way to me. I think the OP raised some good and valid issues. The reply offered reads somewhat 'snarky' and sarcastic to me.

I've been running 'Linux' for 15 years and I understand exactly what the OP was trying to point out.

Read this blog post by someone who is most certainly not a 'troll' but raises some interesting points akin to the OP.
Linux Dying In Dependency Hell
I didn't say the OP is trolling, I said this is good trolling material.
The problem of dependencies is way beyond the scope of this thread. OP complained about simple things that he listed.

Dependencies problems are also valid for Windows, and any system in general. Hardware is evolving, software must follow. The article you linked was really interesting but its a sysadmin perspective. From a developper point of view I can tell you that the thing we hate the most is "'historical code". Some poorly designed code, unstable, partially incompatible with modern hardware, written in speed usually when the project was only a draft and that you can't really mess with because no time/budget to fix everything that depends on it. Then you have tons of users saying "developpers sucks this program doesnt work" but your boss won't care since the blame is on you and the users already paid.
The whole article you linked refers to code refactoring as "Dick With Factor" which sounds really rude to me, as a developper.

The article talks about KISS paradigm, but Windows isn't KISS, and users are not used to it. KISS means people need to be able to handle shell programming to do intersting stuff. If you have programs that perform very basic operations you need a way for the user to orchestrate them to perform complex operations.

That being said here's a little analogy : If you want to keep control of a physical place you must put people in it to maintain it, to fix what time breaks, to adapt to the changes of the environment, you need cops/soliders in case someone attacks... People agree to pay taxes/services for this kind of thing.

This is the same logic that happens with software now. Softwares are a battle field, there are some theives that are specialized to operate there, and the evironment is changing fast. But nobody is willing to pay people to actually take care of this "computer place" which software is.
Simply take a look at all the hardware arround that runs on linux : network devices, IoT devices, personnal computers... Do any of the users or manufactuers actually pay people to keep care of the softwares involved ? The answer is no, or only few of them. And when they pay, they pay to take care of their part of the software and they don't care if it breaks something else.

It's like coming to a big city where nobody pays taxes and complain that things aren't that great. This is disrespectful. Linux is great : with little user adaptation you can have a real alternative system that can be tuned at will.

Code factorization, which is the bigger problem beyond dependencies handling, it something really hard and there is actually no final solution for it. There are tons of really smart people trying to figure out how to not copy/paste code so we don't have to fix the same things 10 000 times. This is the whole point behind new programming languages : how do we give developpers tools to reduce code redudancy ? It's easy to blame, it's harder to find solutions.

To make it clear : the article you linked is of a man who spits on recent decisions pretending that "it was better before" but it was not. Programs at this time were fitting their time. Times have changed, we need to adapt. Having a linux running smoothly on cloud based system is a good guaranty that linux will live for another 30 years. If it hurts sysadmins, that's sad but hey its free software so get your hands dirty. If it hurts companies that rather like giving 60% of their benefits to their investors instead of providing 10% to actually keep their code base up to date well I don't care and I don't think anyone should.
 

ChrisOfBristol

New Member
I don't think this thread is a competition between Linux and Windows/Mac, so I don't think it's necessary to point out the flaws in those OSs. That's a bit like saying "they're crap so it's alright if Linux is crap too", which isn't very productive. I think laiduy98 was suggesting that you have to (metaphorically) look at yourself sometimes and address your own flaws.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
G'day @laiduy98 and @ChrisOfBristol and welcome to linux.org :)

Couple of extremes in age here - Lai (Vietnamese I take it) at 20, and Chris at 119 (maybe not?)



(Wizard appears in a puff of smoke riding a GNU. The GNU does not take well to interdimensional travel and rewards Wizard with a whoopsie on his 3,000 year old genune Persian carpet.Wizard kicks himself in the butt for not first appearing in the laundry).

I am just wrapping up installing Chakra Linux to make 44 Linux distros on this Dell, and I'll be back a little later with some structured, not arguments, but statements, and also to correct some wrong statements.

But I will wear velvet gloves, not boxing gloves.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz

Edited - added BTW

Geez Chris, you're going to be busy following me - hope it's entertaining as well as instructive :D
 
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wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Short version first.

Duy, I heartily agree with a number of your comments.

I have just crashed a recently installed Chakra Linux in attempting to install Timeshift on it.

I have installed and worked with over 150 LInux distros, and typically run between 60 and 100 at a time.

I have been using Timeshift for over 5 years.

Prior to now, the only one I have had difficulty in installing Timeshift on, was openSUSE.

Chakra is the 2nd. And the issue revolved around ... dependencies and scripts.

Not to be outdone, as part of the tragedy, I managed to "brick" Bash, our shell, and the KDE desktop on Chakra would not allow me to reboot, nor would Terminal (Konsole, on KDE). So I had to power down.

I was up and running again in about 2 minutes, because I have so many alternatives, but a New User would be lost.

I am off to clean up the mess and install a substitute for the project I am running.

I'll be back tomorrow Oz time with more.

Cheers and enjoy your Linux, it really IS the best OS

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

70 Tango Charlie

Gold Member
Gold Supporter
Hello everyone,
Here's a little perspective from an 85 year old guy, for what it's worth.
One thing I have learned in life is this: There is no free lunch! Everything has a price.
The price for Windows is the amount of money included in the computer you purchase. It's the same with Mac.
The price for Linux is the time it takes to learn how the operating system works.
The best thing about learning something is: no one can ever take it away from you, only age can do that.
Even though Linux is free as far as money is concerned, it does have a price to pay.
TC
 

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