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Why Do I Bother

I spend much time researching the Tutorials I create and post on this Forum that are easy to understand...use and work...many hours on websites and watching videos.

Linux is a community where we help each other...some people forget this. I could keep this information to myself but won't because that’s not me and not right especially when a new member asks for help...isn't this what we're supposed to do.

I don’t post these Tutorials to big note myself or pretend to be an expert which I’m not... it’s most unfortunate that the people who complain be it a few don’t post their own Tutorials on the same subject...I doubt that’s going to happen.

I suppose there will always be those who rubbish other people’s efforts of cause not every one is like this...that’s life...end of rant.
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A wolf doesn't concern himself with the comments of sheep. Keep doing your thing. Remember, linux is also known as a community of people who think they're better than everyone else. You should see a lot of other linux forums. New users come on there and ask legitimate questions based on their knowledge and skills and the advanced users just crucify him/her and say some of the most ignorant things you can imagine. Everyone was new once and broke distros and had to look up every command they entered. Never forget where you came from.
 


Next time they comment, just politely tell them that you're looking forward to their next tutorial.
 
The biggest question for me is - why don't other people bother?

Thousands of "members". A handful of regular helpers.

Why? Where are they all?

I used to moderate on https://linuxnewbieguide.org/ , when they had a Forum. Unfortunately, the site only attracted newbies and not "experts" to answer their questions...
 
The biggest question for me is - why don't other people bother?

Thousands of "members". A handful of regular helpers.

Why? Where are they all?
Nature of the beast, look at the number of people who join ask a question, and don't even come back for the answer, or those who do accept the help offered, but never come back to say thanks, it worked.
All forums have a core of regulars who do their best to support the site, not everyone has the time to do so, some members may feel they do not have enough experience.
And then we have the modern attitudes of I want, I Want it now, I don't want to work for it.
[or in our terms, I want to use Kali,I don't want to learn Linux, I just want to start hacking]

Knowledge comes from experience, experience comes with age, Thus many of us regulars are Old, and yes we get grumpy at times.
 
Addendum
I have had one this morning on the Parrot forums, new member just a screenshot no further information
this was my reply to him [just remember we only guide , we do not hold hands on the Parrot forums]

"A little information would not go amiss.
Are you installing to Hard drive or VM
if to hard drive, are you trying to multi boot? [if so]
is your current system Windows 8.2 or newer? [if so]
Did you disable windows quick start [fast boot], secure boot, and do a full re-start before you started to install Parrot?"
this was his reply
"installing in ssd, multi boot, windows 11, fast boot enabled & secure boot disabled."


so I just replied with the last line of my comment again

this is unfortunately the quality of questions and response often seen across all forums
 
Addendum
I have had one this morning on the Parrot forums, new member just a screenshot no further information
this was my reply to him [just remember we only guide , we do not hold hands on the Parrot forums]

"A little information would not go amiss.
Are you installing to Hard drive or VM
if to hard drive, are you trying to multi boot? [if so]
is your current system Windows 8.2 or newer? [if so]
Did you disable windows quick start [fast boot], secure boot, and do a full re-start before you started to install Parrot?"
this was his reply
"installing in ssd, multi boot, windows 11, fast boot enabled & secure boot disabled."


so I just replied with the last line of my comment again

this is unfortunately the quality of questions and response often seen across all forums

Yes we are often expected to know what distro and what their machine is without them telling us because we have crystal balls and can read entrails of Goats to get the answers and understand vague descriptions of issues.
 
Yes we are often expected to know what distro and what their machine is without them telling us because we have crystal balls and can read entrails of Goats to get the answers and understand vague descriptions of issues.
^^^ On the head, Darren, on the head..!! :D

When I started ten years ago, I often got the impression that, especially for the "early adopters" in the 90s, it was as much a 'status' thing as it was anything else.

Many of these guys were sysadmins, or in similar positions at work. They saw learning Linux as another "string to their bow", and they were damned if they were going to give away - for free - the hard-won knowledge it may have taken them years to amass. They had to learn it all from scratch, the "hard" way.....so why shouldn't you?

I think, myself, that this was more than likely the origin of that "RTFM!" put-down that so many used to growl at noobs.....

One of the expected rites-of-passage seemed to have been setting-up your own server, followed by putting together and running your own website. Remember, this was in the very early days of the world-wide web, when there wasn't a fraction of the available advice/guides/resources that we nowadays take for granted.....mostly, because it simply didn't yet exist. So it was even more of an achievement to get all this working.....and was, apparently, the only way to get your peers to take you seriously.

How times have changed... :p


Mike. ;)
 
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^^^ On the head, Darren, on the head..!! :D

When I started ten years ago, I often got the impression that, especially for the "early adopters" in the 90s, it was as much a 'status' thing as it was anything else.

Many of these guys were sysadmins, or in similar positions at work. They saw learning Linux as another "string to their bow", and they were damned if they were going to give away - for free - the hard-won knowledge it may have taken them years to amass. They had to learn it all from scratch, the "hard" way.....so why shouldn't you?

I think, myself, that this was more than likely the origin of that "RTFM!" put-down that so many used to growl at noobs.....

One of the expected rites-of-passage seemed to have been setting-up your own server, followed by putting together and running your own website. Remember, this was in the very early days of the world-wide web, when there wasn't a fraction of the available advice/guides/resources that we nowadays take for granted.....mostly, because it simply didn't yet exist. So it was even more of an achievement to get all this working.....and was, apparently, the only way to get your peers to take you seriously.

How times have changed... :p


Mike. ;)

^^^ On the head, Darren, on the head..!! :D

When I started ten years ago, I often got the impression that, especially for the "early adopters" in the 90s, it was as much a 'status' thing as it was anything else.

Many of these guys were sysadmins, or in similar positions at work. They saw learning Linux as another "string to their bow", and they were damned if they were going to give away - for free - the hard-won knowledge it may have taken them years to amass. They had to learn it all from scratch, the "hard" way.....so why shouldn't you?

I think, myself, that this was more than likely the origin of that "RTFM!" put-down that so many used to growl at noobs.....

One of the expected rites-of-passage seemed to have been setting-up your own server, followed by putting together and running your own website. Remember, this was in the very early days of the world-wide web, when there wasn't a fraction of the available advice/guides/resources that we nowadays take for granted.....mostly, because it simply didn't yet exist. So it was even more of an achievement to get all this working.....and was, apparently, the only way to get your peers to take you seriously.

How times have changed... :p


Mike. ;)
Agreed, times have changed. The amount of time, craftsmanship and dedication isn't being practiced or put forth as much as it used to be.
Too many details are being skipped over and projects are rushed in the name of profit.

Anyway, regardless of the ways things have changed, I'll continue to write articles for our Linux Community and keep truckin.:)
 
When I started ten years ago, I often got the impression that, especially for the "early adopters" in the 90s, it was as much a 'status' thing as it was anything else.
I could not agree more, I came to Linux quite early [not full time] at that time I was running both 95&97 but still has a 286 running IBM OS, when Linux arrived on the scene I was told of its similarities to IBM, so I started playing with it. It was very difficult to get any online help. by 1998 things had changed a little. And I began using Linux more. But the overall elitist thing was still prevalent, I started using Linux as a Main drive, when Mint 3 hit the scene. The difference in attitude since then is clear to see.
 
But the overall elitist thing was still prevalent,

I like that this site has very little of that. We can be pretty hard on a newbie or someone who doesn't really ask good questions, but we're usually at least helpful within all that.
 
@bob466 :-

Always look on the bright side, buddy.

All my life, I've taken the view that if I can help someone with something, and it's within my power to do so, then I will.

During my first few years with Puppy, I wrote a ton of wee 'how-tos' and tutorials, in part because Puppy is just sufficiently different that the way you do stuff is not always immediately apparent.....and because I'm like that. That's just me; it's how I've always been.

I received so much help when I first started with Puppy that - to my way of thinking - it was only natural to want to reciprocate. I'm probably primarily a 'packager'; I've lost track of the number of different apps/pieces of software I've packaged up for Puppy over the years - more recently, I've begun building stuff from scratch as my knowledge/abilities have increased - but an indication of just how much there is can be obtained by perusing the links in my siggy.

(Currently, there's probably somewhere in the region of 30 GB-worth + of Puppy-specific stuff, spread across 3 different cloud a/cs..! In many cases, they've been joint efforts; other community members have chipped-in, with suggestions, snippets of code to help improve whatever I'm working on, etc.

And I always give credit where it's due, and acknowledge that assistance. I refuse to take credit for somebody else's contribution, because that's not right.)


People like me and thee ARE very much appreciated, mate.......even if the recipients of that knowledge don't always vocalize that appreciation. We luv ya!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~​

As KGIII says above:-



So true, mate. SO true...... :rolleyes:

(shrug)


Mike. ;)
I left a few months ago and have no intention of returning. I admit, I peek at the site once in a while.
The self-aggrandizing post #16 from "Saint Mike" beats all and I am calling it out.

I quit when Mike publicly chastised me over my inability to recognize newbies with homework questions. I provided direct answers to their questions when I should not have done so. The message was clear: I am too gullible and should not be helping here. So I left.

I am not fishing for sympathy or encouragement (forget it), but only this opportunity to say my piece.
 
Onward & Upward, sphen.

btw.....I don't answer 'homework' questions....simply because I do not have sufficient knowledge to do that.

If I had the knowledge to do so I most certainly would.

I take my hat off to those who do. That is what this site is all about. Helping.
 
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I suppose if we don't bother nearly everyone would be using windowz because Linux is too hard.
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...because we have crystal balls and can read entrails of Goats...

Doesn't everybody have those, Daz? I thought they were standard issue.

The self-aggrandizing post #16 from "Saint Mike" beats all and I am calling it out.

adjective: self-aggrandising
  1. promoting oneself as being powerful or important.

I don't find Mike's post at #16 to be that way at all. It was balanced, and his #28 further qualified his opinions.

If you find a "Tsk, tsk" to be chastising you, you may be overthinking it, and being overly sensitive.

Maybe lighten up, and don't call people out?

Cheers

Wizard
 

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