Which linux version is best ?

suvro998

New Member
I'm a newbie and Windows user. However, I'm planning to switch to one of the Linux version that is most user friendly. Can you suggest me the best ?
 


Tolkem

Member
Hi @suvro998 For a new Linux user there are plenty of options as you may already know, however, I find Linux Lite to be a very friendly user distro and foolproof; it's been designed with Windows users in mind who are willing to make the switch to Linux just like you. Linux Lite's community is also a very friendly one, people there will help you as much as possible. Find out more here https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/index.php Also, you might want to visit https://distrowatch.com/ take a look at distros reviews, user comments, download those that catch your attention and try them from a USB stick in live mode. You can use rufus for that purpose
that youtube tutorial is easy to follow. It might worth watching this video https://itsfoss.com/best-linux-beginners/

Hope this helps! :)
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
Last edited:

1of7

New Member
I'm a newbie and Windows user. However, I'm planning to switch to one of the Linux version that is most user friendly. Can you suggest me the best ?
You could take a look at distrowatch.com to get an overview of the many options. (see: https://distrowatch.com/, bottom of right panel, 'Page hit ranking')
Also, wikipedia has a good graphic of the evolution of the various distros: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_distribution. This will give you and inkling of what to expect from a distro from what it was based on. For example, package management (see below).

I am partial to Slackware but it's because it was the only viable one that had growth potential available to me when I first started out. At that time I was exploring minix on S-100 buses. To me, SW is the simplest of the distributions to install since the 'benevolent dictator' made it pretty much turnkey. However, saying that, moving beyond the basic install can be intimidating at first blush to new users. If you choose this distro, you WILL learn gnu/linux. There is strong camaraderie within the Slackware community (re: linuxquestions.org)
All that being said, there are distros that ease the transition from the 'trust-me' proprietary OSes like windows. PCLinuxOS purports to do just this. If you are looking for a distro with a breadth of software, the Debian and debian-like distros (ubuntu) provide an enormous software base. Not that this software can't be ported to other distros with some effort and dependency magic. If you are looking for commercial level OSes, look at IBM/Redhat or the associated community based OS Fedora and Centos distros. Arch linux and its offshoot Manjaro are strong distros with good package management and an active user base.
You may find that installing new software and package dependency management varies in each distro. From what I've seen, over the years this has been the biggest challenge to new users. If you want to trust your package management over to established programs consider APT (gnu/debian) or RPM (redhat, centos, pclinuxos). Slackware doesn't have a stock automated package dependency management. The benevolent dictator and his squires handle these dependencies by providing either pre-compiled binary packages or text listing dependencies. (see; slackpkg, sbopkg).
There so much more to explore.
As far as learning gnu/linux, it's a great time, you're entering a software candy shop.
 

rado84

Active Member
I think for a beginner Mint 18.3 Cinnamon is the best - very similar to Windows when it comes to using it but better than Windows cuz its customization abilities are limitless. Not 19.1 cuz it's still glitchy.
 

Linpassion

New Member
Depend what do you want to do whit Linux. For example to my use Slackware is a good things: Libreoffice, Gimp, Audacius, LaTex and Internet. All under Xfce4.
 
I Have kinda the same question. I completely understand that its by taste and personal preference, then system capabilities,then just pure look and feel. But I want is something that makes me use more of the inner-workings rather than just have an almost 1-1 to windows/mac file system. I am currently having trouble wrapping my head around the basic workings of the terminal, getting programs through it, and just normal uses of it. so i feel that a distro that makes me use the terminal and more of the workings without leaving me in the dark and by myself would be very valuable ......so any suggestions? Should I stick with Mint cinnamon 19 and just use the terminal as much as possible then change later or change now and figure it out my self?
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
I want is something that makes me use more of the inner-workings rather than just have an almost 1-1 to windows/mac file system.
The best way to learn Linux is by using Linux.
I am currently having trouble wrapping my head around the basic workings of the terminal, getting programs through it, and just normal uses of it. so i feel that a distro that makes me use the terminal and more of the workings without leaving me in the dark and by myself would be very valuable ......so any suggestions?
Learn to use the Software Manager and Synaptic Package Manager to install software.


Once you've mastered those than move onto learning about the command terminal.

Don't jump into things to fast and than become confused and discouraged.
Should I stick with Mint cinnamon 19
If Linux Mint Cinnamon is working for what you need to do than stay with it.
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member

TechnoJunky

Well-Known Member
There are distros that are good for beginners and there are distros good for experts. You can use the terminal in any distro. Like Poorguy says above, if Mint with Cinnamon is working for you, stick with it. You can use the terminal in it, instead of anything in the gui. So if you want to enable/disable wifi, do it in terminal instead of right clicking the wifi symbol in the system tray. Anything you can do in the gui, you can do in terminal.
 

captain-sensible

Active Member
Personally i can't see that much that can be learned from apt-get . its just a command and when implemented what goes on just flashes in front of you. So if you want to learn there must be an elment of the right attitude. what at first might see tedious can also be lloked at that you might learn something from it. For instance no dependency programs when you use slackbuilds might seem an old fashioned novelty, and with several deps a tedious affair. But wait ..when you go to slackbuilds for a package you have to read about the deps, you learn their names why they are needed a little about what they do. If you take a slackbuild apart you can learn quite a bit about bash Thus Slackware is good if you want to learn a bit about basics of linux, terminal interpreter and bash. Straight away it forces to go look in /etc/rc.d , either set permissions or write some bash in rc.local thats because unlike windows which is like some pompus waiter ,lurking behind your baack and pouring your wine when you didn't ask it to and a noisy neighbor trying to . Slackware doesn't assume you want wifi to work out of the bag. it lets you choose what you want running
 

TechnoJunky

Well-Known Member
No one would argue with you on any of those points captain-sensible. But Slackware would likely be overwhelming for a newbie. [email protected] said "I am currently having trouble wrapping my head around the basic workings of the terminal". I think he needs to get his feet wet. I think Slackware is throwing him in the deep end of the pool. :)
 
Personally i can't see that much that can be learned from apt-get . its just a command and when implemented what goes on just flashes in front of you. So if you want to learn there must be an elment of the right attitude. what at first might see tedious can also be lloked at that you might learn something from it. For instance no dependency programs when you use slackbuilds might seem an old fashioned novelty, and with several deps a tedious affair. But wait ..when you go to slackbuilds for a package you have to read about the deps, you learn their names why they are needed a little about what they do. If you take a slackbuild apart you can learn quite a bit about bash Thus Slackware is good if you want to learn a bit about basics of linux, terminal interpreter and bash. Straight away it forces to go look in /etc/rc.d , either set permissions or write some bash in rc.local thats because unlike windows which is like some pompus waiter ,lurking behind your baack and pouring your wine when you didn't ask it to and a noisy neighbor trying to . Slackware doesn't assume you want wifi to work out of the bag. it lets you choose what you want running
Yeah this is how I found I learn best. But I don't wanna jump directly into the ocean, I need to stray in the deep end and learn to swim that way... If that makes sense... But I also dig the whole use cinnamon and learn different parts. Thanx for the insight!
 
The best way to learn Linux is by using Linux.

Learn to use the Software Manager and Synaptic Package Manager to install software.


Once you've mastered those than move onto learning about the command terminal.

Don't jump into things to fast and than become confused and discouraged.

If Linux Mint Cinnamon is working for what you need to do than stay with it.
I'm gonna try this out Thanx!
 
No one would argue with you on any of those points captain-sensible. But Slackware would likely be overwhelming for a newbie. [email protected] said "I am currently having trouble wrapping my head around the basic workings of the terminal". I think he needs to get his feet wet. I think Slackware is throwing him in the deep end of the pool. :)
LOL my biggest concern... Thanx
 

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