Which Linux to use?

garynewport

New Member
Credits
56
I am looking for advice in relation to the version of Linux and any other considerations others might think I should consider.

I am running a simulation written in Fortran. I have already adapted the program and reduced it's run time such that on my Macbook Air it takes 40 minutes to run a basic model and on my Windows PC it can run in 5 minutes.

However, my Windows PC (which is clearly the more powerful of my two systems) can take 40 minutes or even over 2 hours to run the same code; depending upon...well, I am not too sure. It appears to be on services, updates and other processes in the background but it has proven difficult to tie this down.

Equally, my PC is a gaming PC that I use for...well...gaming. I also play music on it, etc, etc, etc

When I run the code remotely at the university I am running it on a Linux server system and the Mac mimics this quite nicely.

I am reasonably familiar with Linux, given that I am frequently working on servers both at university and at work.

My PC has 24GB of RAM with an Intel i7 CPU running at 3GHz (4 core with 8 logical processors). Though the system has already gotten two storage devices (a 1TB SSD and a 1TB HHD), I intend on purchasing another 1TB SSD purely for Linux.

I ONLY intend on running the simulation when in Linux mode; which does not require a GUI or sound; so sound drivers, etc are of little concern.

I am used to using Ubuntu and am happy to continue down this route, but would like the advice and expertise of others to help guide me please.

Any ideas/suggestions/etc?
 


brickwizard

Well-Known Member
Credits
6,898
there are a few distributions lighter than Ubuntu the most popular over the last year is MX-linux others include.. Bodhi ..Linux lite...Elementary, Debian stable Anti-x and so the list goes on,
the best suggestion is to download a few distributions and run them live from a pendrive to see which fits your use best
 

garynewport

New Member
Credits
56
Excellent, thank you.

Is there a good resource that might list these versions (a comparison table, if you will) so I can get an idea of what options are available?

Entering into the world of variant Linux is a daunting thing! :)
 

brickwizard

Well-Known Member
Credits
6,898
The trouble with asking for recommendations is you will get many replies based on the personal use of whom ever replies,
unlike Microsoft or Mac where you get one choice , "take it or leave it" with linux distributions you have a multitude,. linux for desktop, linux for server, linux for special use [eg scientific linux , linux for resurrecting ancient 32 bit machines] and so it goes on at the end of the day your choice is personal to you and dependent on your Kit and what you are trying to do, hence my recommendation to live run a few different distributions.
 

garynewport

New Member
Credits
56
Ah, now you have me intrigued (thank you for replying, by the way).

The simulation I am running is based upon the evolution of stars. The initial state is to develop from a Jupiter-type mass up to a one solar mass star over a period of a million years.

I am currently running this as an experiment over 1 billion years; with the intention of creating massive stars over 1 million and, possibly, a billion years.

So, this is very much scientific in nature; does this help reduce the options of Linux?
 

captain-sensible

Well-Known Member
Credits
14,907
this is what comes up on Arch :

Code:
Fortran77 subroutines for solving large scale eigenvalue problems
C++/Fortran-90 double-double and quad-double library

by the way i ran basic Fortran IV programs in 1975 using punched cards on an IBM 1132
 

brickwizard

Well-Known Member
Credits
6,898

garynewport

New Member
Credits
56
Any build of linux can be adapted to whatever you want to do.....

However [and i have no experience of this] https://labs.fedoraproject.org/en/astronomy/ and this https://www.ubuntupit.com/best-astronomy-software-for-linux/ may be of interest to you

Bwiz
Just in case you think I am one of those 'post and leave it to others to solve my problem' individuals, I have been exploring myself whilst posting. :)

I came across a group of scientific Linux distributions, including the astronomy one. However, this is packed full of really lovely astronomy apps, which would improve my astrophotography and help distract me from my project but might not aid me too much in what I actually need to do! Hahahaha!

I have come across one called BunsenLabs, which I will explore first and then Arch Linux, suggested by captain-sensible.

Again, thank you for your time and effort.
 

garynewport

New Member
Credits
56
this is what comes up on Arch :

Code:
Fortran77 subroutines for solving large scale eigenvalue problems
C++/Fortran-90 double-double and quad-double library

by the way i ran basic Fortran IV programs in 1975 using punched cards on an IBM 1132
I love the fact that even now I have to worry about coding in characteristics to maintain a link back to the punchcard days! 7 spaces in; why?!?! Hahahaha!

Anyway, thank you - will will test this out and compare this to another I found called BunsenLabs.

Be nice not to have the Windows overheads.
 

brickwizard

Well-Known Member
Credits
6,898
U
I have come across one called BunsenLabs,
yes it is another of the popular scientific builds, as I said the choice is yours to make, keep looking and test a few, and keep us up to date,
 

KGIII

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
28,645
$100 Digital Ocean Credit
Get a free VM to test out Linux!


Top