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What the HELL!? Linux Software Center

DreamyAbaddon

New Member
I'm new to Linux and recently discovered that I can install other distro's Software Center!?
I mean WHAAT!?

On Windows10 you are limited to the Windows10 Store as the main OS software Center and on MacOS you are limited to the Mac App Store but apparently, on Linux, you can install other distros Software Center and use apps from other distros as if it was native to your distro.

I had no idea this was even a thing!
I was complaining about how ElementaryOS doesn't have all the software I want but damn I just installed the Ubuntu software center and the apps I want are available there and I can use them without switching to another Linux distro!

Why don't people talk about this often? This is a huge deal!
 


TechnoJunky

Active Member
One of the many, many great things about Linux is that it doesn't lock you down or into anything. You want to switch distros, do it. You want to multi-boot multiple distros, do it. You want this distro with that desktop, do it.
 

atanere

Moderator
Gold Supporter
I think the magic in this case (someone may correct me)... is that the OP is using Elementary OS, which is Ubuntu based, and was able to install the Ubuntu Software Center. But not all Ubuntu based distros may allow this, or need to do this. I'm using Linux Mint, and it includes both Mint and Ubuntu repositories in its software sources, so the Mint Software Center already has full access to all of the Ubuntu programs too. It seems that Elementary starts off being more restricted, probably for simplicity of use (and support).

But the magic, and freedom, of Linux still works is many ways. Take, for example, the differences between KDE and GNOME desktop systems. Many KDE apps are built using the Qt toolkit, but many GNOME apps are built using Gtk toolkit. Yet, you can install KMail or other KDE based programs in GNOME systems too (or vice versa)... though you end up also installing many more libraries to support the new software.

Besides installing from source code (or rpm files, or deb files), there are now also other methods like Flatpak, Appimage, and Snap, that can help make software installation easier for some users. I'm not yet too familiar with these newer methods, but I haven't had much need to install anything not available by the old-school methods.

All of this runs on a Linux kernel, though maybe different versions of the kernel. It's like magic! :D

Cheers
 

TechnoJunky

Active Member
I too think the only real advantage of this is for someone using Elementary. The reason being, and I'm not an expert so the OP or anyone else can correct me, but Elementary's mindset is paying the developers for their work. So in their software center, they have the apps that they support and request money for. If you could install another distro's software center you could get around this and have more apps at your disposal.
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
Can you say "Synaptic Package Manager" that has just about whatever software that you need providing you have the right repositories installed.
 

DreamyAbaddon

New Member
I too think the only real advantage of this is for someone using Elementary. The reason being, and I'm not an expert so the OP or anyone else can correct me, but Elementary's mindset is paying the developers for their work. So in their software center, they have the apps that they support and request money for. If you could install another distro's software center you could get around this and have more apps at your disposal.
You are not required to pay for any apps on Elementary's AppCenter but you can if you want and I do like their mindset because people who write software should get paid and there are too many people who don't pay. I donate from time-to-time to show my support. I'm not a programmer so I cannot contribute to any open sources progress to the software I use sadly.

I think the magic in this case (someone may correct me)... is that the OP is using Elementary OS, which is Ubuntu based, and was able to install the Ubuntu Software Center. But not all Ubuntu based distros may allow this, or need to do this. I'm using Linux Mint, and it includes both Mint and Ubuntu repositories in its software sources, so the Mint Software Center already has full access to all of the Ubuntu programs too. It seems that Elementary starts off being more restricted, probably for simplicity of use (and support).

But the magic, and freedom, of Linux still works is many ways. Take, for example, the differences between KDE and GNOME desktop systems. Many KDE apps are built using the Qt toolkit, but many GNOME apps are built using Gtk toolkit. Yet, you can install KMail or other KDE based programs in GNOME systems too (or vice versa)... though you end up also installing many more libraries to support the new software.

Besides installing from source code (or rpm files, or deb files), there are now also other methods like Flatpak, Appimage, and Snap, that can help make software installation easier for some users. I'm not yet too familiar with these newer methods, but I haven't had much need to install anything not available by the old-school methods.

All of this runs on a Linux kernel, though maybe different versions of the kernel. It's like magic! :D

Cheers
ElementaryOS is based on Ubuntu so you're correct. But I had no idea this is how Linux works. Thank you for explaining. It's very informative and I now understand why these things work so seamlessly.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Big Like to all of the above :)

I am hypnotising the OP -

Go to sleep, go to sleep, go to sleep, dream pleasant thoughts about Linux. When you awaken, you will feel refreshed.

Wizard
 

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