WHAT ARE YOUR TOP COMMAND LINE APPS??????

smooth_buddha

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I'm pretty new to linux but was trying to pimp my command line with some practical apps such as:

wiki- wikipedia
calculator -cal
links - web browser
cmatrix - matrix streaming code from the movie matrix
crawl - a text based game
fortune - everytime you type fortune you get a quote ( fortune told!)
vim - the vim editor
mms - no more secrets decryption code as seen in the movie sneakers ( this is similar to matrix code but it gives effect of you command outputs in encrpytion! pretty cool!)


I also tried wee chat but have no idea really what im doing with that one!!!


please share your cool command line tools or share ones that you like to use

:) :) :) :)
 


mgfacioli

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Hi!!

My favorites are:

htop is great to manage services.

youtube-dl to download videos (not only from youtube)

wget to download applications files

alpine - an Alternatively Licensed Program for Internet News and Email

notify-send - a program to send desktop notifications

mc - Visual file manager and backup tool for Unix-like systems
 

MarkG_108

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ffmpeg is one.
apt (I use Debian) is another.
locate (along with updatedb) is useful.
pip (for installing some stuff, like youtube-dl) is good.
youtube-dl is good.
calcurse is a program that I used to use, and it's great (though I haven't been using it lately).
curl is also useful for downloading stuff.
aria2 is a great download client for bitTorrent files.
libchatbot-eliza-perl (aka Eliza) is great.
There used to be a great commandline program that provided a version of Scrabble called "Scribble", but, alas, due to copyright, this no longer exists.
gramofile is a neat program for converting vinyl records into digital format.
moc a pretty nifty music player.
gtypist is a great touch typing tutor.
nano is a useful editor.
 
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JasKinasis

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I live in the terminal!

Vim - the ultimate editor
Vifm- file manager using vim keybinds
Tmux - terminal multiplexer
ag/silver searcher - multi-threaded grep on steroids
gcc - compiler
clang - compiler
gdb/cgdb - debugger
nasm- assembly compiler
git - distributed scm

Various scripting language interpreters:
Python, Perl, Ruby, etc etc.

w3m - browser - I use w3m in various scripts I've created that allow me to search Google or duckduckgo from the terminal, or to search dictionary.com, or a thesaurus website for word definitions/suggestions.
Dtrx - AKA do the right extract - extract any compressed archives from the terminal
Cmus - powerful and lightweight music player
Scrot - screenshot taking app
Feh - image viewer
T - terminal based twitter client
mutt - email
wget - downloading files
curl - downloading files
apt - package management on my Debian systems (I only use Debian stable or Debian testing ATM!)
All of the other unix-like GNU userland tools.
sed, awk, cut, wc, date/cal etc etc.
ssh - remotely access other machines
rsync - copy/backup files locally/remotely
nc/Netcat- the Swiss army knife for TCP/UDP.
ip - view/modify networking/routing settings
sent - terminal based alternative to powerpoint/impress
farbfeld - suckless image format
st - suckless terminal
surf - suckless browser
tabbed -run programs in tabs
dmenu - text based menu/launcher system for dwm

And my own pet project:
note - a terminal-based note manager
And a project of another Linux.org user called:
goto - which allows you to create named bookmarks for directories and jump straight to them!

Far from an exhaustive list, but some of my favorite and most used terminal based commands/programs!
 
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Eugor

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Spend most of my terminal time tinkering and testing engine parts under the hood of my Thinktoys
Helps me learn as i go.
inxi
stress-ng
tlp
lshw
hardinfo
cpuid
cal
bc
 

Tolkem

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When I first read of this project it gave me the idea to create my own aliases to go to those dirs with a very long path name in .bash_aliases file so I can go to those by just typing a word. Quite a nice list you have there @JasKinasis I myself use a few of those as well, cmus, wget, scrot ... Unlike you I don't live in the terminal but I like having always one at hand and use it quite often. Long live the terminal! :)
One terminal tool I use a lot is
Code:
ncdu
https://dev.yorhel.nl/ncdu
a disk usage analyzer with an ncurses interface. It is designed to find space hogs on a remote server where you don't have an entire graphical setup available, but it is a useful tool even on regular desktop systems. Ncdu aims to be fast, simple and easy to use, and should be able to run in any minimal POSIX-like environment with ncurses installed.
and it is quite very useful when dealing at finding what dirs are eating disk's space as well as deleting rebellious files which refuse to leave your system peacefully.
Code:
qemu-kvm
to run some virtual machines is great too. I used to use virt-manager which is pretty good too but it annoys me that it needs superuser rights to manipulate virtual images, i.e, place them in a usb device to save some space, the terminal version does not. I've ben using it from some time now and am quite happy with it :)

note - a terminal-based note manager
I might try this one https://notabug.org/JasKinasis/note.git. I use zim https://zim-wiki.org/ which can also be managed via terminal, though I use the GUI most of the times. I also use nano quite often when feel lazier than usual lol
 
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JasKinasis

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When I first read of this project it gave me the idea to create my own aliases to go to those dirs with a very long path name in .bash_aliases file so I can go to those by just typing a word. Quite a nice list you have there @JasKinasis I myself use a few of those as well, cmus, wget, scrot ... Unlike you I don't live in the terminal but I like having always one at hand and use it quite often. Long live the terminal! :)
One terminal tool I use a lot is
Code:
ncdu
https://dev.yorhel.nl/ncdu and it is quite very useful when dealing at finding what dirs are eating disk's space as well as deleting rebellious files which refuse to leave your system peacefully.
Code:
qemu-kvm
to run some virtual machines is great too. I used to use virt-manager which is pretty good too but it annoys me that it needs superuser rights to manipulate virtual images, i.e, place them in a usb device to save some space, the terminal version does not. I've ben using it from some time now and am quite happy with it :)



I might try this one https://notabug.org/JasKinasis/note.git. I use zim https://zim-wiki.org/ which can also be managed via terminal, though I use the GUI most of the times. I also use nano quite often when feel lazier than usual lol
I meant to go back and edit my post to add links for note and goto. Completely forgot!
Thanks for adding a link to note!

Here's a link to the Linux.org post about goto:
 

smooth_buddha

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I just added another one to the commandline called : fim

fim lets you view picture file straight from the terminal

comes in hadny if you want to quickly view a photo or pic you have in your files.
 

Rob

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I've been liking xdg-open which allows you to do things like:

xdg-open . # opens that directory in a file browser
xdg-open <file> # opens that file (picture, URL, etc..) in its respective default application

of course, i have it aliased to 'open' in my .bashrc because it's much easier/faster to type: :)
alias open='xdg-open'
 

Tolkem

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I just added another one to the commandline called : fim

fim lets you view picture file straight from the terminal

comes in hadny if you want to quickly view a photo or pic you have in your files.
FIM hasn't been updated/maintained for nearly almost 2 years. Last commit was on March 2018 http://savannah.nongnu.org/support/?group=fbi-improved I'm not saying that's necessarily a problem but just thought you should know. Since you seem to be so enthusiastic about this, may I suggest that you install virtualbox? You could create a couple of virtual machines and try in those whatever it is you want to preventing both your real machine and system from any potential damage. It's the safest way I know to do this kind of stuff, believe me, I should know since I like trying new apps and stuff :cool: but always play with them in a VM first just to make sure they're worth installing in my real pc/system, if they're not, then I won't thus saving me the trouble of having to remove them later. Also, for viewing and editing images you could try imagemagick https://imagemagick.org/ and/or feh https://feh.finalrewind.org/, both can be managed from the terminal and unlike FIM are currently being mantained and updated. :) I use them both and they're pretty powerful and useful for basic as well as for advanced usage/scenarios.

I've been liking xdg-open which allows you to do things like:

xdg-open . # opens that directory in a file browser
xdg-open <file> # opens that file (picture, URL, etc..) in its respective default application
If you don't mind me asking, what's the adavantage of using xdg over calling the app, i.e file browser directly? For example, you could just do
Code:
thunar some_dir
and thunar will open that dir, in the same fashion you could do
Code:
gimp some_img
. For the record, I'm not questioning your approach and/or saying it is wrong or any of that sort but rather the opposite, I'm simply curious. :)

EDIT: After re-reading your post I got my own answer, this
xdg-open <file> # opens that file (picture, URL, etc..) in its respective default application
seems pretty useful actually so instead of typing the actual app's name, i.e imagemagick you just type
Code:
open some_file
sorry for the previous :).
 
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JasKinasis

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I've been liking xdg-open which allows you to do things like:

xdg-open . # opens that directory in a file browser
xdg-open <file> # opens that file (picture, URL, etc..) in its respective default application

of course, i have it aliased to 'open' in my .bashrc because it's much easier/faster to type: :)
alias open='xdg-open'
I completely forgot about xdg-open when I did my list. I use that sometimes too!
That alias idea is a good one. I might just steal that! :D
 

craigevil

Active Member
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tilde
Tilde is a text editor for the console/terminal, which provides an intuitive
interface for people accustomed to GUI environments such as Gnome, KDE
and Windows. For example, the short-cut to copy the current selection is
Control-C, and to paste the previously copied text the short-cut Control-V can
be used. As another example, the File menu can be accessed by pressing Meta-F.
inxi - full featured system information script
irssi - terminal based IRC client
gomuks - A terminal based Matrix client written in Go
moc - ncurses based console audio player
nano - ncurses-based editor
apt - commandline package manager
Htop is an ncursed-based process viewer similar to top
screen - terminal multiplexer with VT100/ANSI terminal emulation
open-adventure - colossal cave adventure, the 1995 430-point version
nethack-console

Yes I know this thread is over a year old. :)
 

sayanarijit

New Member
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neovim - Code editor
bat - cat replacement
lsd - ls replacement
sd - sed replacement
dua-cli - Disk utilization viewer
jq - JSON viewer
yq - YAML viewer
httpie - curl replacement
fzf - File finder and text selector
ripgrep - grep replacement
mpv - Video player
bottom - top replacement
spotify-tui - Music player
xplr - File explorer (I developed)
nix - Package manager
 

JasKinasis

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Since my development team switched to Agile development, using the Scrum methodology, I've been using stup to organise notes for my daily standup meetings. A very neat and handy litlte terminal based tool.

stup is created by fellow Linux.org user @iridakos (who also created goto - see above).
A link to the stup thread is here:
 

f33dm3bits

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Gold Supporter
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Since my development team switched to Agile development, using the Scrum methodology, I've been using stup to organise notes for my daily standup meetings. A very neat and handy litlte terminal based tool.

stup is created by fellow Linux.org user @iridakos (who also created goto - see above).
A link to the stup thread is here:
Off-topic: @wizardfromoz There have been several topics now where there have already been a pre-existing topic that gets lost after not being used for a while, then a new topic gets created. After which the new topic gets locked and the new topic gets merged into the old one. Would it be an idea to sticky those topics so that they are more easily findable since they would then appear at the top of each category.
 
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rado84

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Using a rolling release of Arch, one would think my most used command would be the one for package update. But it's not. :D My aliases list is long but in the last 2 months the most used aliases by me are the ones that convert DTS to AC3, such as
Code:
alias mka640="ffmpeg -i *.mka -vn -ar 44100 -ac 2 -ab 640k -f ac3 output640.ac3 && exit"
though for the one above I recently found a GUI program which allows bulk conversion + having the output file to have the same name as in the input file - two things not available through the terminal. Or if they are, I still haven't discovered how to do them in the terminal.

Below is my full list of aliases, if anyone's curious. :)
 

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