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questioneverything

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Hi Everyone,
After years of frustration with an increasingly obtuse microsoft management, I have made the switch to a linux OS, in particular, Ubuntu Studio. I must say I am in general most impressed with this robust and stable operating system. That being said, I have come to a conclusion which I am sure will be controversial. The best way to beat the competition is to LEAD it. I believe that this is why almost all linux developers still cling to the terminal window as a means of interacting with the computer, because if we were ever able to just activate a function from the GUI (like say "print") then no one would ever buy windows again. Most people don't want to learn a command language and have to open a terminal and type in a command every time they want to activate a simple task. So I believe that further development of the linux GUI is deliberately stiffled. Just my opinion.
 


Nelson Muntz

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if we were ever able to just activate a function from the GUI (like say "print")

Most people don't want to learn a command language and have to open a terminal and type in a command every time they want to activate a simple task.
Hello questioneverything,

Welcome to Linux.org.


Hmm.

I don't know about all of that as I can install and update and configure my Linux distro and install software and do just about everything needed through the GUI.

The terminal is used to do things that can't be done from a GUI.

I have no problems navigating from within the terminal.
I have a Linux distro that uses only cli and has no GUI.
 
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captain-sensible

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The real trouble is that Linux developers are like cats, that can not be herded so that they focus efforts together. My empirical observation is that artists tend to be creative but messy. Coders talented in one area lack skills in other areas; let me mention business acumen. As an example the BDFL of slackware was nearly broke not so long back. If Microsoft brought out a linux distro at a cost and had dedicated support they would clean up
 

KGIII

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If Microsoft brought out a linux distro at a cost and had dedicated support they would clean up
I've been expecting them to do so for years now, since about when they started Azure and included Linux as a choice. It seems like a logical move for them to make for them to buy one outright, but I suppose they could do one in-house. If they ported their Office suites over at the same time, they'd make a killing with it.
 

stan

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Linux developers are like cats, that can not be herded
Cats CAN be herded! I saw it on the internet! o_O

if we were ever able to just activate a function from the GUI (like say "print") then no one would ever buy windows again
Printing doesn't need a GUI or a shell. CTRL-P activates the printing dialog in both Windows and Linux for whatever document has focus. Learning keyboard shortcuts will save tons of time and work -- that is something most Windows users haven't mastered, from my experience. Everyone wants to do everything with a mouse, which is very slow and cumbersome.

Since the OP is relatively new to Linux, I think they have not yet realized how powerful the shell is, and why it is preferred in so many instances over a GUI. The shell is an asset, not an ancient relic.
 
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Nelson Muntz

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FWIW.





 

stan

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Clicking with a mouse is slow and cumbersome? Compared to ???
Keyboard shortcuts, as I said above. I think a great example is the simple act of shutting down a computer. With both Windows and Linux, it typically takes THREE mouse clicks to shut down, each with a fair amount of precision (not exact) to click the Menu button, then the Power icon, then to choose Shutdown (or Restart, Logoff, whatever). I have a simple keyboard shortcut (CTRL-ALT-DEL) that immediately shuts down my computer. Boom, done! But shame on me if I forgot to save any open documents because any changes will be lost. Still, this is a clean and fast shutdown. I also have CTRL-ALT-R configured to reboot. These are customized shortcuts.

Want to reload a web page? By the time you can grab your mouse, I've already hit F5 and the page is reloading. Want your browser to go full screen? Hit F11. Hit F11 again to bring it back to the previous window size. Web fonts too small? Keep hitting CTRL and "+" key to make bigger, then CTRL and "-" key to make smaller, or CTRL and "0" (zero) to make it the standard size again. These are standard shortcuts that work on any browser I've ever used. There are buttons to click or menus you can open with a mouse to do these things, but it will take you longer.

When you click on the File menu on any program, look at the keyboard shortcuts that it will show you there. On all of the menus: File, Edit, View, etc. There are certainly many uses for a mouse, but speed is not its strong point. Check out @Nelson Muntz's links, and I'm sure you'll find a lot of very helpful info. Keyboard shortcuts make computing much easier, and faster.
 
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questioneverything

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punching keys on a keyboard is no different than multiple mouse clicks except that there are many more of them if you have to open a terminal window and type in a command of any kind. If you want the people who are producing the best apps to create linux versions, then you are going to HAVE to increase market share, and the average joe is just not interested in programming a bunch of shortcut keys. He's just NOT. So, with the addiction to the terminal window a reality, I see no prospect of ever getting Melodyne or Wavelab or any other essential audio tool in a linux version.
 

KGIII

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I should point out that not all of us care. I don't actually care if Linux increases market share. I don't care if it's adopted by the masses as a desktop environment. I don't use Linux because of any philosophical reasons. I'm not a zealot, nor do I care what someone else uses as their OS of choice.

It lets me accomplish everything I want to do, usually in a straightforward and easy manner. I use Linux because it just works for me. I do not care one iota if Average Joe wants to use Linux. Average Joe shouldn't be afraid of learning new things. If Average Joe isn't going to learn new things, that's his fault.

I also do not care if the latest trendy apps come to Linux. I care that I control my devices and decide what I need. I don't even care if it's open source. I use proprietary applications all the time. Heck, the very software running this forum is proprietary software. It's not even free as in beer.

If Linux doesn't suit your needs, you can either change it or use a different operating system. That there is freedom. Linux fills all my personal computational needs - including driving my cell phone.

Also, there are a ton of music editing applications for Linux. I cover a different song nearly every week, all the instruments, and do the vast majority of the work in Audacity.
 

questioneverything

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I run a recording studio. Customers expect you to have high end pitch correction apps like Melodyne and many want to see pro tools. It would not hurt the terminal window functionality of your machine to have it also be more GUI capable. If you want to continue to have Microsoft control all the BEST software makers, just continue to have that attitude.
 


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