Ubuntu Studio for "Front End Website Development". HTML, CSS, JavaScript, WordPress.

aoib578

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Hey guys,


My primary need for an OS is to do "Front End WordPress Website Development". HTML, CSS, JavaScript, WordPress.
As long as a distro is suited for this purpose (like Ubuntu is); i'm happy!

Ubuntu Studio - KDE Plasma - https://ubuntustudio.org/ - Is perfect for me; because it's an audio, video, graphics design, and photography oriented OS.
But what about "Front End Web Development"? Will it handle it well?


THE IMPORTANT QUESTION IS:
- Should i choose whatever Ubuntu Desktop flavour i like and install the audio, video, graphics design, and photography apps that Ubuntu Studio has?

- Or should i choose Ubuntu Studio (considering it was designed, customized and tweaked) to be a creative OS. And install the Front End Development tools that Ubuntu has, and is capable of handling?

- Considering the info provided. What is the best route?


After i make a choice; if the distro works well for my needs; i won't change it until the LTS support is over!
Anyone at all, including those doing Front End WordPress Website Development + audio, video, graphics design, and photography (that could chime in, would be great).
 


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aoib578

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When it comes to any kind of programming - it really doesn’t matter what distro you use!
@JasKinasis

The feedback i got is that some distros are better suited for programming. Including web development.
Ubuntu is one of them.
I believe what you said, but Ubuntu Studio seems a bit more specific as it's focused on creativity.
Audio, video, graphic design, photography.

Will it handle my Web Development needs fine?
 

f33dm3bits

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You can install the programming tools you need on any distribution, something like Ubuntu Studio just comes installed with a set of tools that may not but installed on for example Vanilla Ubuntu or another distribution.
 
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aoib578

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You can install the programming tools you need on any distribution, something like Ubuntu Studio just comes installed with a set of tools that may not but installed on for example Vanilla Ubuntu or another distribution.
@f33dm3bits,

Yes, but the tools in ubuntu studio might be a pain to configure properly on LTS Ubuntu. Or not really?

- With Ubuntu Long-Term Support LTS version, you get security/maintenance updates for at least five years from its release.
- Ubuntu flavours get three years of support for LTS versions.

Another point to consider :)
 

f33dm3bits

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For most software it should be a matter of "apt install package-name", for other software maybe needing to install the Flatpak, AppImage or Snap or by adding a ppa and in some other occasions you may have to install it differently.

You seem to be new to Linux because the way you are thinking is to closed minded as in the Windows way of thinking about things. There are more options when running GNU/Linux, you don't have to pick a distribution because it is advertised as being good for programming.

You pick one you think you like and then you install the software you need that isn't installed already. Distributions like Ubuntu Studio, Kali and such are just distributions with a set of presets that have tools installed as the type of distribution they advertise to be.

Most front-end developers I know prefer working with newer software even when they are developing or setting up they application on Rhel. LTS doesn't mean an update will not break at some point, with none-LTS because updates are more frequent chances are higher that things may break. But you being a front-end developer I would think you make backups of your data and your system.
 
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aoib578

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For most software it should be a matter of "apt install package-name", for other software maybe needing to install the Flatpak, AppImage or Snap or by adding a ppa and in some other occasions you may have to install it differently.

You seem to be new to Linux because the way you are thinking is to closed minded as in the Windows way of thinking about things. There are more options when running GNU/Linux, you don't have to pick a distribution because it is advertised as being good for programming.

You pick one you think you like and then you install the software you need that isn't installed already. Distributions like Ubuntu Studio, Kali and such are just distributions with a set of presets that have tools installed as the type of distribution they advertise to be.

Most front-end developers I know prefer working with newer software even when they are developing or setting up they application on Rhel. LTS doesn't mean an update will not break at some point, with none-LTS because updates are more frequent chances are higher that things may break. But you being a front-end developer I would think you make backups of your data.
@f33dm3bits

Not completely new to linux. Used RedHat CLI at work, long ago; and tried some distros on vmware workstation.
I'm coming from using windows mostly.

The issue is, i'm getting contradictory feedback from different people which is normal! :)

Some guys from manjaro forum told me instead of installing privacy/security apps from parrot in manjaro i should just switch to parrot.
The feedback has been similar, that i should just jump to one distro that has what i need the most and install the rest.
Other guys here say it's all the same.
This i don't know, as i don't have enough experience.

I will choose LTS because in the end it's just more stable.
Yes i make backups sure. I just need to choose a Ubuntu flavor and switch away from manjaro. Just because it has small issues i don't want to deal with...

Whatever Ubuntu distro i go for is my preference.

- I really just need to know that the creativity tools Ubuntu Studio has will work well on Plain Ubuntu?

- And if i choose Ubuntu Studio, if it's going to do web development well?

- Regular Ubuntu does! So are they exactly the same in this regard?


In my position what would you choose? And why?
 

f33dm3bits

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Some guys from manjaro forum told me instead of installing privacy/security apps from parrot in manjaro i should just switch to parrot.
The feedback has been similar, that i should just jump to one distro that has what i need the most and install the rest.
Other guys here say it's all the same.
This i don't know, as i don't have enough experience.
That's just stupid, say a distribution has the tools installed by default that you need but you dislike the distribution itself and prefer another distribution. That would mean you would force yourself to use that distribution just because it has the tools installed by default that you need. Imagine having to use distribution that you dislike every day, that wouldn't make working with it a pleasant experience.

Whatever Ubuntu distro i go for is my preference.

- I really just need to know that the creativity tools Ubuntu Studio has will work well on Plain Ubuntu?

- And if i choose Ubuntu Studio, if it's going to do web development well?

- Regular Ubuntu does! So are they exactly the same in this regard?
I have no idea what tools are install in Ubuntu Studio that you would be using, you would have to come up with a list. However you could also just install vanilla Ubuntu in a vm and Ubuntu Studio in a vm and then see which tools you use and see if you can install them on your vm with Vanilla Ubuntu. Then when you have a question of how to install something , you can post here or on the forum or another forum or message board if you like.
In my position what would you choose? And why?
I work with Rhel at work that would mean with the logic you mentioned above I would either have to use Rhel or Fedora as my workstation setup at work, however I use Vanilla Ubuntu LTS as my workstation at work and I install whatever I need. I always choose the distribution I want to run and then I just install the tools I need. I have vscodium installed both on my home pc running Fedora and on my workstation at work running Ubuntu. Does that answer your question?
 
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aoib578

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That's just stupid, say a distribution has the tools installed by default that you need but you dislike the distribution itself and prefer another distribution. That would mean you would force yourself to use that distribution just because it has the tools installed by default that you need. Imagine having to use distribution that you dislike every day, that wouldn't make working with it a pleasant experience.
Completely agree with you!
Check this thread reply from manjaro frorum. Not saying what he said is wrong.
This thread is related to when i narrowed down manjaro and parrot.
Now, my switch to ubuntu as you know is purely for stability purposes.

I like manjaro way more than parrot, and i asked about installing all the privacy/security tools parrot has. And this was his reply.

1660417301463.png

I have no idea what tools are install in Ubuntu Studio that you would be using, you would have to come up with a list. However you could also just install vanilla Ubuntu in a vm and Ubuntu Studio in a vm and then see which tools you use and see if you can install them on your vm with Vanilla Ubuntu. Then when you have a question of how to install something , you can post here or on the forum or another forum or message board if you like.

I will install both VM's and compare. If i notice Vanilla Ubuntu works well, then i just have to choose what desktop i prefer and switch to the relating distro. I am not going to install XFCE over Vanilla Ubuntu's Gnome Shell, as there's no point in this; right?

I work with Rhel at work that would mean I would either have to use Rhel or Fedora as my workstation setup at work, however I use Vanilla Ubuntu LTS as my workstation at work and I install whatever I need. I always choose the distribution I want to run and then I just install the tools I need. I have vscodium installed both on my home pc running Fedora and on my workstation at work running Ubuntu. Does that answer your question?

Yes. Considering yours and my point above, where we choose the distro and desktop we like 1st. The rest comes down to installing the software we want.
This is the correct mindset to start my Linux journey. Right?

And thanks a lot for chiming in! You got to the most important points and cleared the bullshit out.
 

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f33dm3bits

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Check this thread reply from manjaro frorum. Not saying what he said is wrong.
This came when i narrowed down manjaro and parrot.
Well one reply I can agree on the reply where the person is saying you are trying to overcome too much at once is also hinting that you seem to be new to Linux. You can't tackle everything at once, just take one step at a time. However I am still for going for a distribution you like and then just going one step at a time. Figure out how you install and remove software and how to navigate the command-line and how permissions and ownership work. Once you get more comfortable you find something else and at some point you are able to compile software from source if you need.

Also if you don't want to clutter your normal daily driver install with a bunch of pen-testing tools to test your websites, there is no shame in running Kali in a vm for and running your pen-tests for your website from there. I can imagine that since your main work consists of programming that you don't want to clutter your system with tools you only use every now and then as secondary task. Being able to run vm's is also a tool you can use as part of your work flow.

And tools like Anonsurf that aren't found in regular repos of distributions usually have a Github or Gitlab source where you can install it from source and they have instructions of how to install it.
 
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aoib578

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Well one reply I can agree on the reply where the person is saying you are trying to overcome too much at once is also hinting that you seem to be new to Linux. You can't tackle everything at once, just take one step at a time. However I am still for going for a distribution you like and then just going one step at a time. Figure out how you install and remove software and how to navigate the command-line and how permissions and ownership work. Once you get more comfortable you find something else and at some point you are able to compile software from source if you need.
I am not new to Linux. But i don't know it's internals/config files well. This will take time.
I almost compiled LibreWolf from source the other day but it failed. It's not so hard.
It's just following the steps and using google as source for solutions to errors.

Also if you don't want to clutter your normal daily driver install with a bunch of pen-testing tools to test your websites, there is no shame in running Kali in a vm for and running your pen-tests for your website from there. I can imagine that since your main work consists of programming that you don't want to clutter your system with tools you only use every now and then as secondary task. Being able to run vm's is also a tool you can use as part of your work flow.
Yes this is an excellent strategy i will adopt.
I even learned pfSense Firewall can be installed in a virtual machine with Virtual Box.


And tools like Anonsurf that aren't found in regular repos of distributions usually have a Github or Gitlab source where you can install it from source and they have instructions of how to install it.
This way works on any Linux which is great.
 

f33dm3bits

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I am not new to Linux. But i don't know it's internals/config files well. This will take time.
Let me put it this way, you don't seem to know Linux well enough or else you wouldn't be asking the questions you are asking that being the reason why you gave the first impression of being new to Linux. However that will come with experience as it does for everyone.
 
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aoib578

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Let me put it this way, you don't seem to know Linux well enough or else you wouldn't be asking the questions you are asking that being the reason why you gave the first impression of being new to Linux. However that will come with experience as it does for everyone.
Agreed! And thanks a lot for your help!
Linux community is great!
 

JasKinasis

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@JasKinasis

The feedback i got is that some distros are better suited for programming. Including web development.
Ubuntu is one of them.
I believe what you said, but Ubuntu Studio seems a bit more specific as it's focused on creativity.
Audio, video, graphic design, photography.

Will it handle my Web Development needs fine?
@f33dm3bits has pretty much everything covered, I think.
As a bit of background - I’m a professional programmer, I’ve been using Linux exclusively for many, many years. It honestly doesn’t matter what distro you use. All of the tools you’ll want, or need for any type of programming are available in the repositories of all distros. And any that are not are typically installable via other repositories like GitHub (build/install from source), or via alternative formats like appimage/flatpak/snapcraft.

Most distros only have typical day to day desktop software installed. They don’t come with many development tools installed by default.
Ubuntu Studio has a lot of video/audio/art tools installed and configured by default, but you’d still have to install any development tools you need yourself.

Perl and Python will already be installed on most systems, as there are lots of system scripts that use Perl and Python. But it’s only bare minimal Perl/Python environments. But additional development libraries and things like compilers (gcc/g++/clang), debuggers (gdb), or servers (Apache, tomcat), web-frameworks (flask, Ruby on the rails), IDE’s and other development tools would need to be installed manually post-install.

So once again - it really doesn’t matter what distro you use for development.
If Ubuntu Studio is your daily-driver, then it’s as good as any other!
 
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This and other threads about "which distro" go to show why there are so many different distros.
Any of the main distributions, including Debian, Ubuntu, Arch, Fedora, OpenSuse, Red Hat/Centos, etc
will have more or less the same tools in their repos. Any missing tool that you might need should be easy enough to install.

Pick a distro that you like and install the things that you "need".
 

KGIII

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This and other threads about "which distro" go to show why there are so many different distros.

We get the question so often that I think it's a waste of our valuable forum member's time.

I have not discussed this with anyone! It's unlikely to happen, but it's my thinking (and I'm very intoxicated)...

My thinking is we move all these sorts of questions to the same section of the forum and lock them with a comment suggesting they use the search function.

I appreciate that people are confused and unsure, but this information is out there - and out there many times over and in multiple formats.
 

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I agree and I am not so intoxicated (yet).

To my mind, the simplest way to make a decision on a Distro other then Ubuntu Studio is to identify what apps it has that are non-standard to Ubuntu Desktop, and then pursue one of two options:
  1. Set up VM's through Virtualbox, VMWare or other, take a Distro and install and add the requisite tools and try them, or
  2. For Debian-based Distros, use a Live USB scenario with Persistence loaded and do likewise?
Seems like a no-brainer.

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 
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aoib578

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Your message and from the other users is very clear!
I won't ever ask repeated questions like this again.
I thought ubuntu studio was a more specific distro because of the creative software it comes with. But it's just like any other...

I will only add something to what you said below, because of my research on Linux distros so far.
You are at a Guru level. You know what you're saying :)

@f33dm3bits
So once again - it really doesn’t matter what distro you use for development.
If Ubuntu Studio is your daily-driver, then it’s as good as any other!
"For me" as long as a distro is stable and has LTS support, it then comes down to "Desktop Environment" preference.
I will test installing ubuntu studio apps in an LTS with 5 years support, to see if it's easy and fast.

I wanted to have perspectives and possible issues. But there aren't any issues...
The wise choice seems to be a 5 years LTS release.

I am moving from Manjaro to Ubuntu because of stability, and easier package management dependencies.
 
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aoib578

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This and other threads about "which distro" go to show why there are so many different distros.
Any of the main distributions, including Debian, Ubuntu, Arch, Fedora, OpenSuse, Red Hat/Centos, etc
will have more or less the same tools in their repos. Any missing tool that you might need should be easy enough to install.

Pick a distro that you like and install the things that you "need".
Indeed. The only other factor is what i mentioned to @JasKinasis

Some people might prefer stability over cutting/bleeding edge software updates as with Arch/Manjaro.
 

f33dm3bits

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I am moving from Manjaro to Ubuntu because of stability, and easier package management dependencies.
And you must love Snaps ;)
 
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