Ubuntu boot problem (No choice menu) directly loading win10

Yara

New Member
Believe it or not
I delete partition /dev/sda1 it didn't effect in lunching Win10 o_O
Also delete partition /dev/sda8 "BIOS Boot" as the "Partition Type" it didn't effect in lunching Ubuntu o_O
 
Last edited:


atanere

Well-Known Member
I delete partition /dev/sda1 now it didn't effect in lunching Win10 o_O
Whoa, slow down. :eek::D

I'm at work and can't stay on here right now, but I'll comment again later. I don't want you to kill the whole computer.... unless that is your goal!

Back in a bit. Maybe a couple of hours though.
 

Yara

New Member
Whoa, slow down. :eek::D

I'm at work and can't stay on here right now, but I'll comment again later. I don't want you to kill the whole computer.... unless that is your goal!

Back in a bit. Maybe a couple of hours though.
Ok i'll wait :D
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
Believe it or not
I delete partition /dev/sda1 it didn't effect in lunching Win10 o_O
Also delete partition /dev/sda8 "BIOS Boot" as the "Partition Type" it didn't effect in lunching Ubuntu o_O
Hi @Yara, You're right... deleting those partition should not have caused any (more) boot problems, at least since you're now getting Ubuntu through the UEFI. That "BIOS Boot" partition was put there at some point when you had switched to Legacy Mode. But that Windows Recovery in /dev/sda1 is no longer available, and not knowing the details about it, there is a chance that you can't make a HP Recovery Set now, if you haven't done that before now.

If you delete /dev/sda2 --- you wont' be booting anything anymore.... until you re-install something from DVD or USB. That is your UEFI Boot partition, and it is needed to start both Windows and Ubuntu.

So, what would you like to do at this point? If you want to delete all of the partitions and start over from scratch, the instructions I gave in post #37 cover that in general.... but we might want to double check them and be sure of the steps exactly. If you boot on a Windows 10 setup DVD or USB, one of the steps it asks is what partition you want to install to... at that step you can delete every partition until the entire hard drive shows as "unallocated space "or "unpartitioned space"... then then when you proceed with the setup, Windows will put a new /dev/sda1 and a couple of other partitions that are required.

After that, then Ubuntu can be installed again, but we would want to again be very careful in the choices. You're right, I would not suggest that you do the "something else" method of installing.... but instead choose to "install alongside Windows". I mentioned about the "third party software" earlier too, that you do not want to check that if it requires you to disable Secure Boot (and I think that it will require it).

But also, because of the recent problems discovered with Ubuntu 17.,10, I don't know if you want to continue to try to use that, or not. I think an updated 17.10 will be release shortly to fix the problem they are having with that, and it might be good to wait for that (even though it doesn't seem that the problem affected you).

If you just want to delete partitions, there are not many more left that are safe to delete... which is why I wanted you to slow down. It doesn't take much of a mistake to make the computer non-bootable.

So, let us know what you'd like to do, and we will keep working to try to help you get things going.

Cheers
 

Yara

New Member
HP Recovery
Hi @atanere my laptop came without any CDs. So I don't have HP recovery CD.

Ok i'll Reinstall both win10 and Linux and start HD from scratch.
So witch Linux distribute you suggest and are Ubuntu Apps can work on it?

Also you said "Do not encrypt the Home folder unless privacy/security is greatly needed."
But I don't know where can i found this option?
Also after install linux do you want me to use repair boot command in terminal or not?
There is an APP called "APTonCD" This tool will allow you to create a media (CD or DVD) to use to install software via APT in a non-connected machine, as well upgrade and install the same set of softwares in several machines with no need to re-download the packages again. So if i use it Is That effect on new Ubuntu i installed or not?


If you just want to delete partitions, there are not many more left that are safe to delete... which is why I wanted you to slow down. It doesn't take much of a mistake to make the computer non-bootable.
Yes i understand that Don't worry :) i delete those partitions because i know that the worst case is reinstalling Windows 10.
Thanks
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
Hi @atanere my laptop came without any CDs. So I don't have HP recovery CD.

Ok i'll Reinstall both win10 and Linux and start HD from scratch.
So witch Linux distribute you suggest and are Ubuntu Apps can work on it?

Also you said "Do not encrypt the Home folder unless privacy/security is greatly needed."
But I don't know where can i found this option?
Also after install linux do you want me to use repair boot command in terminal or not?
There is an APP called "APTonCD" This tool will allow you to create a media (CD or DVD) to use to install software via APT in a non-connected machine, as well upgrade and install the same set of softwares in several machines with no need to re-download the packages again. So if i use it Is That effect on new Ubuntu i installed or not?



Yes i understand that Don't worry :) i delete those partitions because i know that the worst case is reinstalling Windows 10.
Thanks
Hi @Yara. The big companies (HP, Dell, Acer... all of them) stopped including CD's or DVD's a long time ago. But I think that all of them include a program that lets you create your own Recovery Set (to DVD or USB). It might take up to 4 or 5 DVD's to make such a set, but it is a good idea to do this shortly after you buy a new computer. This "factory recovery" is also on the hard drive... but if hard drive failure is the problem, you need the backup Recovery DVD/USB to restore your computer after getting a replacement hard drive. That's the idea, anyway. You may can still create the "factory recovery" using the HP app.... unless it happens that the /dev/sda1 partition is the one that HP uses to create the set. If you have spare DVD's (or a spare USB stick... probably 32 GB needed) it might still be worthwhile for you to create the HP Recovery Set. This set would include all of the HP-included programs and extras that came with the computer when it was new.... some people like that stuff, some people don't.

The Windows 10 .iso that you downloaded will only put Windows 10 back on, without all the extra HP tools and software. I have used this Windows 10 .iso myself to restore my computer without all the HP stuff, and Windows still "activates" as a registered version with Microsoft. This is under that category of "digital license" from Microsoft... basically when you activate Windows, they recognize your computer and know that it is a legitimate copy. This is still a good backup to have, even if you make a HP Recovery Set too.

If you have both.... then you can decide which to install to restore your computer and start all over from scratch. And you will have the option to change your mind and switch to the other too, if you decide.

Which Ubuntu? Right now, that is a good question. I read more today about the "bug" that has been found in 17.10, and it can cause problems in some HP computers too. I don't think mine was affected, and I don't think yours was affected either.... but I'm a little nervous to keep working with 17.10 until Ubuntu releases a fix for this. This bug is very serious, and if it were to damage your computer, it might require a new motherboard to fix it. And if you had to replace the motherboard, then Windows 10 would NOT activate properly anymore either.... that would be a bad situation.

Right now, if you are anxious to start making big changes... I would say to pick your Windows 10 option and use it to restore Windows 10 first. Let it erase all of your partitions, and let it install itself how it wants too. It will create at least 3 partitions (Recovery, Microsoft Reserved, and Basic Data).... and maybe more. Looking again I see that you now have 3 Basic Data partitions.... one of those is Windows, and Windows may have created the other 2 also, or maybe you or your brother created them.

Remember to backup anything important before restoring Windows 10.... it will erase everything! :eek:

I am hopeful that Ubuntu releases a fix soon. And maybe by working with Windows for a day or couple of days, perhaps that will be enough to see a new Ubuntu. If not, you might want to use their last "long-term" version, 16.04.3. and install it for now. The next new Ubuntu will be out in April, and you will be able to upgrade to that, which I think will be pretty easy. There are some differences between what you've seen with 17.10 and with 16.04.3.... but I think that they are minor enough to not be much trouble. The new version in April (18.04) will be more like 17.10. Have you figured out yet that Ubuntu versions are based on the date? So 17.10 was released in October 2017, and 18.04 will be released in April 2018, and 16.04.3 is the "3rd update" of the one released in April 2016.

APTonCD.... I don't think you'll need that. If you have a good internet connection, it is better to get software online so you know you're always getting the current one.

Encrypting the Home folder... this option is just a "checkbox" during the Ubuntu installation (on the screen where you create a user name, and password... located near the bottom, by the selection to "log on automatically"). It is not checked by default, and I usually discourage it (unless very seriously needed) because it brings added complexity to the file system. But if laptop theft, or other security reasons are a concern, it is an option for added privacy of your data. Since I don't use it, I don't really know how it works.... you may need to create another password to protect the encryption... and of course, in that case it should be a very strong password (or pass phrase).

After you install Ubuntu, you may need to try the bcdedit at the Windows command prompt to make GRUB come up instead of going straight into Windows. Of course that is the battle we have been fighting all along! o_O This command worked for me with a fresh installation, and I am hopeful (again) that if you do a fresh install that it will work on yours also.

I can go through the Windows 10 installation steps with you again too, if you want. It's no harm to the computer to do that. If you if have troubles, you may go through the re-install an extra time or two also to make everything just right. My only limitation right now is time... because I have to work for 2 more days before I get a few days off again. I can't help or follow along from work very well (although I do try to check in and see what's going on when I get breaks).

OK, enough for now. No need to rush, but if you're ready to erase a computer.... that is usually pretty easy to do! :D

Cheers
 

Yara

New Member
Right now, if you are anxious to start making big changes... I would say to pick your Windows 10 option and use it to restore Windows 10 first. Let it erase all of your partitions, and let it install itself how it wants too. It will create at least 3 partitions (Recovery, Microsoft Reserved, and Basic Data).... and maybe more. Looking again I see that you now have 3 Basic Data partitions.... one of those is Windows, and Windows may have created the other 2 also, or maybe you or your brother created them.

Remember to backup anything important before restoring Windows 10.... it will erase everything! :eek:
Thanks @atanere for your honest ,help ,support,patience and all advises
i did as you said
1- Backup important files
2- Went into the BIOS Setup--- "Exit" screen--- "Load Setup Defaults" then "Exit Saving Changes". Yes Secure Boot is enabled.
3- Boot from Win10 bootable USB. Deleted all partitions and created the 4th one in photo this one for data
Automatically it created 3 partitions and it marked (C) to install Win10 so i followed all installation instructions



Which Ubuntu? Right now, that is a good question. I read more today about the "bug" that has been found in 17.10, and it can cause problems in some HP computers too. I don't think mine was affected, and I don't think yours was affected either.... but I'm a little nervous to keep working with 17.10 until Ubuntu releases a fix for this. This bug is very serious, and if it were to damage your computer, it might require a new motherboard to fix it. And if you had to replace the motherboard, then Windows 10 would NOT activate properly anymore either.... that would be a bad situation.
That is really sound so bad. I'm not going to install Ubuntu 17.10 again. But i still support Linux because of you and all people helped me.
Actually i want safe distribute and stable. People used for long time to use it at least "No hardware damages" also i can run Ubuntu apps on it.
I'll wait for you until finishing your work.
Thanks @atanere so much.
Thanks @wizardfromoz for all your help.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
You are certainly welcome from my small contribution, @Yara :rolleyes: ... Stan (@atanere ) is a good man whom is very conscientious and goes the extra yards with all our "customers".

Unusual for Ubuntu, whom are usually very good, and they don't need this grief at this very busy time of year.

Linux Mint, Zorin, Fedora ... there are many Distros to choose from, and one will likely appeal to you, and we have expertise in many areas.

Make distrowatch.com your friend, you can wander through 100 if you are so inclined and take a look at what each offers and try them out with a Live USB or DVD.

Just start a new thread (topic) when you have any questions, or even a "feel good" one to say you have found what suits you, we will look forward to it.

Cheers and Season's Best and be safe and enjoy Linux.

Wizard
 

Yara

New Member
You are certainly welcome from my small contribution, @Yara :rolleyes: ... Stan (@atanere ) is a good man whom is very conscientious and goes the extra yards with all our "customers".

Unusual for Ubuntu, whom are usually very good, and they don't need this grief at this very busy time of year.

Linux Mint, Zorin, Fedora ... there are many Distros to choose from, and one will likely appeal to you, and we have expertise in many areas.

Make distrowatch.com your friend, you can wander through 100 if you are so inclined and take a look at what each offers and try them out with a Live USB or DVD.

Just start a new thread (topic) when you have any questions, or even a "feel good" one to say you have found what suits you, we will look forward to it.

Cheers and Season's Best and be safe and enjoy Linux.

Wizard
Thanks @wizardfromoz i'm feeling good because i knew you and @atanere and all people helped me on this website
All of you taught me a lot about Linux and let me knew how it's great project supported with great and good people . I really grateful to all of you. And appreciate your helping.
@atanere also said
I am hopeful that Ubuntu releases a fix soon. And maybe by working with Windows for a day or couple of days, perhaps that will be enough to see a new Ubuntu. If not, you might want to use their last "long-term" version, 16.04.3. and install it for now. The next new Ubuntu will be out in April, and you will be able to upgrade to that, which I think will be pretty easy. There are some differences between what you've seen with 17.10 and with 16.04.3.... but I think that they are minor enough to not be much trouble. The new version in April (18.04) will be more like 17.10. Have you figured out yet that Ubuntu versions are based on the date? So 17.10 was released in October 2017, and 18.04 will be released in April 2018, and 16.04.3 is the "3rd update" of the one released in April 2016.
So I'm waiting him until finishing his work.
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
Thanks @atanere for your honest ,help ,support,patience and all advises
i did as you said
1- Backup important files
2- Went into the BIOS Setup--- "Exit" screen--- "Load Setup Defaults" then "Exit Saving Changes". Yes Secure Boot is enabled.
3- Boot from Win10 bootable USB. Deleted all partitions and created the 4th one in photo this one for data
Automatically it created 3 partitions and it marked (C) to install Win10 so i followed all installation instructions





That is really sound so bad. I'm not going to install Ubuntu 17.10 again. But i still support Linux because of you and all people helped me.
Actually i want safe distribute and stable. People used for long time to use it at least "No hardware damages" also i can run Ubuntu apps on it.
I'll wait for you until finishing your work.
Thanks @atanere so much.
Thanks @wizardfromoz for all your help.
Hi @Yara! Nice work! That is a very typical Windows installation. Have you thought yet about which partition you will use to create new space for Linux? I am guessing that the C: drive (about 100 GB) will stay as it is (and it will fill up more over time with updates and new programs that you will install). So, the D: is probably where you take space from to create a new partition for Linux.

Earlier, I had said that you would probably use the "Install alongside Windows" option of the Linux installer, but that option would take space away from the C: drive, so I think we will have to change the plan about that if you want to use some of the space on D: instead. No worries... this will just need the "Something else" option that you've used before. And we can take it slowly through the Linux install to try to make sure we get all the boot options correct. I am currently re-installing Windows 10 with a Data partition so that I can follow along and hopefully avoid any missteps.

I just checked on Ubuntu, and they have not yet released a fix for 17.10. Are you interested in using a different Linux instead of Ubuntu? I use Linux Mint, which is based on Ubuntu, so that anything that is compatible with Ubuntu is also compatible with Linux Mint. There are several different "desktop environments" available for Mint, and I use the one that is called MATE (others are Cinnamon, KDE, and XFCE). Besides Linux Mint, there are other Linux distros that are also Ubuntu based, so there are really quite a lot of options available to you.

I saw you posted to another thread and that you are interested in some of the different desktops (the graphical interfaces). While it is possible to install more than one inside an installed Linux, this is probably a little far advanced for you right now. (It's a little far advanced for me too! :confused:) But, you can still check them out to try to see which you like best.... and then use what you like best to be the Linux that you install to your hard drive. But the best way to "test them out" means to download the .iso file for each one and burn it to a DVD or USB, then boot your computer on that and use it for awhile to see how you like it. I would usually recommend that you use DVD's for this, if you have a DVD drive... because sometimes re-using a USB over and over again can cause it to get messed up (and DVD's are cheaper than USB sticks).

Many (or most) of the Linux distros offer choices for different desktops, but some only offer one type of desktop. Some are more "traditional" (meaning like Windows, or Mac) and some are a little more "modern" (like the GNOME desktop that was used by Ubuntu 17.10 -- but just before 17.10 Ubuntu used a different desktop called Unity, which it is now phasing out). They are all very good, actually, and a lot just depends on what you learn on and what you get used to. So now is a good time for you to try to look around and evaluate some of them while your mind is open to new things. You can see screenshots on the web if you look around, but running a "live Linux" on DVD or USB can give you a better look and feel for these different desktop environments.

Also, running the "live Linux" will often show if there is any conflicts with your computer's hardware... for example, you want to be sure that your wireless works, and sound. Sometimes there are some problems with the graphics/video displays, but you don't necessarily want to be discouraged if you find a problem because often there is a way to fix them too. For another example, a very common problem (especially with laptops) is that you will boot up on the DVD/USB and the screen will be totally black (so black it looks like it shut down the power).... but it's actually still running! With this problem, you can shine a bright flashlight at the screen and see the desktop is there, so what has happened is that the "backlight" of the display does not light up so you can see anything. Well, there is an easier fix for this than shining a flashlight and trying to use your computer.... when the DVD/USB starts to boot up, you have to get into a settings screen and add a special command (called nomodeset) and then it will boot up and be visible. If you run into this problem, we can go through the steps more completely so that you can fix this issue.

OK, sorry to be so long (I'm pretty bad about that, I know). But look around at some of the other Linux distros and desktop environments ("DE's") to see if any appeal to you. DistroWatch is one of the best places to look around... they have a list (on the right side of their page) with the 100 most popular Linux distros (in their opinion), and if you click on each one, they each have a special page with some information, and there is usually a link to screenshots to show you some pictures of what they look like in operation.

Cheers
 

Yara

New Member
Hi @Yara! Nice work! That is a very typical Windows installation. Have you thought yet about which partition you will use to create new space for Linux? I am guessing that the C: drive (about 100 GB) will stay as it is (and it will fill up more over time with updates and new programs that you will install). So, the D: is probably where you take space from to create a new partition for Linux.

Earlier, I had said that you would probably use the "Install alongside Windows" option of the Linux installer, but that option would take space away from the C: drive, so I think we will have to change the plan about that if you want to use some of the space on D: instead. No worries... this will just need the "Something else" option that you've used before. And we can take it slowly through the Linux install to try to make sure we get all the boot options correct. I am currently re-installing Windows 10 with a Data partition so that I can follow along and hopefully avoid any missteps.

I just checked on Ubuntu, and they have not yet released a fix for 17.10. Are you interested in using a different Linux instead of Ubuntu? I use Linux Mint, which is based on Ubuntu, so that anything that is compatible with Ubuntu is also compatible with Linux Mint. There are several different "desktop environments" available for Mint, and I use the one that is called MATE (others are Cinnamon, KDE, and XFCE). Besides Linux Mint, there are other Linux distros that are also Ubuntu based, so there are really quite a lot of options available to you.

I saw you posted to another thread and that you are interested in some of the different desktops (the graphical interfaces). While it is possible to install more than one inside an installed Linux, this is probably a little far advanced for you right now. (It's a little far advanced for me too! :confused:) But, you can still check them out to try to see which you like best.... and then use what you like best to be the Linux that you install to your hard drive. But the best way to "test them out" means to download the .iso file for each one and burn it to a DVD or USB, then boot your computer on that and use it for awhile to see how you like it. I would usually recommend that you use DVD's for this, if you have a DVD drive... because sometimes re-using a USB over and over again can cause it to get messed up (and DVD's are cheaper than USB sticks).

Many (or most) of the Linux distros offer choices for different desktops, but some only offer one type of desktop. Some are more "traditional" (meaning like Windows, or Mac) and some are a little more "modern" (like the GNOME desktop that was used by Ubuntu 17.10 -- but just before 17.10 Ubuntu used a different desktop called Unity, which it is now phasing out). They are all very good, actually, and a lot just depends on what you learn on and what you get used to. So now is a good time for you to try to look around and evaluate some of them while your mind is open to new things. You can see screenshots on the web if you look around, but running a "live Linux" on DVD or USB can give you a better look and feel for these different desktop environments.

Also, running the "live Linux" will often show if there is any conflicts with your computer's hardware... for example, you want to be sure that your wireless works, and sound. Sometimes there are some problems with the graphics/video displays, but you don't necessarily want to be discouraged if you find a problem because often there is a way to fix them too. For another example, a very common problem (especially with laptops) is that you will boot up on the DVD/USB and the screen will be totally black (so black it looks like it shut down the power).... but it's actually still running! With this problem, you can shine a bright flashlight at the screen and see the desktop is there, so what has happened is that the "backlight" of the display does not light up so you can see anything. Well, there is an easier fix for this than shining a flashlight and trying to use your computer.... when the DVD/USB starts to boot up, you have to get into a settings screen and add a special command (called nomodeset) and then it will boot up and be visible. If you run into this problem, we can go through the steps more completely so that you can fix this issue.

OK, sorry to be so long (I'm pretty bad about that, I know). But look around at some of the other Linux distros and desktop environments ("DE's") to see if any appeal to you. DistroWatch is one of the best places to look around... they have a list (on the right side of their page) with the 100 most popular Linux distros (in their opinion), and if you click on each one, they each have a special page with some information, and there is usually a link to screenshots to show you some pictures of what they look like in operation.

Cheers
Thanks a lot @atanere this is very helpful.You aren't so long. I like when you explain every thing to me. As new person in this ocean "Linux" every thing is new for me even websites when i checked DistroWatch I felt so confusing. So thanks for your instructions Actually i was going to use USB over and over again Thanks for saving me. Thanks also for telling me about black screen I think if i saw that before tilling me i'll freak out.
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
And in my best Homer voice (again).... D'oh! :confused::D

The reason this time is that I saw you liked a post in another thread that discussed using "virtual machines" (VM's) to test out Linux. I should have thought to mention that to you also! Have you learned more about this way yet? You can install a program in Windows called VirtualBox and then you can use different Linux .iso files to install as virtual machines (instead of using DVD's or USB sticks).

It's a very good method, and I'm sorry I didn't think to suggest it sooner. Each virtual machine needs hard drive space, about 10-15 GB for each one... but after you test a Linux out for awhile, if you decide you don't like that one, you remove the virtual machine and tell it to delete all files so you recover the hard drive space. You still have to download the large .iso files for any version you want to test out, but you might like this way of experimenting before you decide to go with one full time on your hard drive as an equal to Windows.

Let us know if you want to try this out and we can go into more details. But the DVD/USB method is still a good way too, and doesn't require any assistance from Windows at all. Whatever sounds best to you!

Cheers
 

Yara

New Member
And in my best Homer voice (again).... D'oh! :confused::D

The reason this time is that I saw you liked a post in another thread that discussed using "virtual machines" (VM's) to test out Linux. I should have thought to mention that to you also! Have you learned more about this way yet? You can install a program in Windows called VirtualBox and then you can use different Linux .iso files to install as virtual machines (instead of using DVD's or USB sticks).

It's a very good method, and I'm sorry I didn't think to suggest it sooner. Each virtual machine needs hard drive space, about 10-15 GB for each one... but after you test a Linux out for awhile, if you decide you don't like that one, you remove the virtual machine and tell it to delete all files so you recover the hard drive space. You still have to download the large .iso files for any version you want to test out, but you might like this way of experimenting before you decide to go with one full time on your hard drive as an equal to Windows.

Let us know if you want to try this out and we can go into more details. But the DVD/USB method is still a good way too, and doesn't require any assistance from Windows at all. Whatever sounds best to you!

Cheers
Thanks @atanere :)
Acutely While i'm searching in DistroWatch found Mint, Debian , Manjaro , Fedora
First I checked Debian because most of apps I need from it but It's so hard .Finally Manjaro his rank is growing. But I like it because I can easily install any Apps belongs to another distro on it . Also it has variety of "desktop environments". So I visited their site and I'm reading their user guide now. Also I wants to know what people said about it so while my searching by coincidence the search toke me to this thread. :) About (VM's) I didn't used them before but if you saying that "It's a very good method" ok let us try it and I've free space for it.
But first you told me that you using Mate in your Linux. So I found it in Manjaro Community Editions "Mate (17.0.4)".

right now I don't now what to do :(. I'm reading and reading ...
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
right now I don't now what to do :(. I'm reading and reading ...
Ah, but you're doing great! Reading and reading is a very healthy thing to do because there is so much to learn. It's an overwhelming amount to learn really, and we realize that. And we are in no rush and we should not rush you. You can read more about VM's and decide if you want to do that or not. Or you can learn more about some of these different distros and choose to burn one to DVD to try it out that way first. Both of these methods are great ways to explore Linux.

Debian, and Fedora, and Manjaro and all good, yet they are quite different from one another. I would never recommend Arch Linux to a new user, but Manjaro makes Arch possible for you. All of them are available with various desktop environments, including MATE, but also others that you might enjoy trying out.

So, take your time and try to soak in what you can. Ask any questions about these, or other Linux distributions. When you want to test one out, we're ready to help.

Cheers
 



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