Tor and the Darknet

Have you visited the Darknet?

  • Yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I may visit soon

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    1
D

DevynCJohnson

Guest
The Internet is a large place that is becoming increasingly popular and larger. The Internet provides many benefits and services. For instance, people from nearly anywhere in the world can communicate via Skype, Google+, Twitter, Facebook, and many other forums and social sites. People can also shop, learn, play, etc. However, like the physical world, people may be concerned about privacy and security. Thankfully, Tor offers great security, privacy, and more.

Getting Tor
To install the Tor Browser on Ubuntu, add the below PPA.
Code:
add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/tor-browser
Next, run the below command with Root privileges. If Tor is in the default repos of other Debian-based distros, then the below command may work without the above PPA.
Code:
apt-get update
apt-get install tor-browser
For Fedora, add the Tor repo by creating a file (/etc/yum.repos.d/tor.repo) and pacing the below code in the file. Afterwards, execute “yum install tor” in a command-line with Root privileges.
Code:
[Tor]
name=Tor Project Repo
baseurl=http://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org/rpm/fc/20/$basearch/
gpgcheck=1
enabled=1
gpgkey=http://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org/rpm/RPM-GPG-KEY-torproject.org.asc
Many installation guides can be found at https://www.torproject.org/docs/installguide.html

Tor-Browser.png


About Tor
Tor is open-source freeware written is C. The browser is available for all systems including Windows, Linux (and Android), OS X, iOS, and various Unixoid systems. Tor is an acronym for "The Onion Router". Tor networks are made up of "Tor Relays". When a Tor client connects to a server, a random path between the client and server is created among the Tor relays. The data is encrypted many times. Each relay decrypts the data once to get information as to where to send the data next. Then, the next relay decrypts another layer and sends the data to the next relay until the data reaches the client or server. Since the data is encrypted multiple times, the data is often compared to an onion with many layers (hence the name). This layered concept is called "Onion Routing".

NOTE: Tor relays are sometimes called Tor servers or Onion Routers.

Because of the way Tor operates, this provides users with additional security and privacy from black-hat hackers and cruel governments. Some countries restrict the sites users may view. Other countries penalize users from using certain sites. Tor provides people with the freedom they deserve. For example, China restricts its citizens from viewing Tibetan material. People that see nothing wrong with the peaceful Tibetan practices may wish to learn more about such banned subjects. Tor offers freedom that the politicians fail to give to their citizens.

FUN FACT: Edward Snowden informed the Guardian and the Washington Post about PRISM by using the Tor web-browser in June 2013.

Not only does Tor provide anonymous web browsing, but it also acts as a gateway to the Dark Web (also called the Deepnet, Deep Web or Dark Internet). According to many sources (like The Guardian - http://www.theguardian.com/) the Darknet is larger than the Surface Internet (the Internet people are familiar with). The Dark Web is not accessible to regular web browsers like Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome (an exception is mentioned later). Rather, the Dark Web is accessible via the Tor Web-browser.

NOTE: The "Darknet" is the part of the Deep Web accessible by Tor and Onion routing. Other subdivisions exist in the Deep Web.

The Darknet
The Darknet is designed a little differently than the Surface Internet. Many websites on the Darknet use domain names that are 16-character hashes (random characters) that make up an 80-bit number in base32 rather than purposely designed domain names (like "Wikipedia.org" or "DCJTech.info"). Also, many website domain names (or addresses) end in ".onion" instead of ".com" or ".net". JavaScript is typically disabled in the Tor browser because Darknet websites are not supposed to use JavaScript. This helps with security and privacy.

".onion" is not an official top-level-domain. However, the Darknet uses Tor DNS servers rather than Internet DNS servers. Other possible top-level-domains on the Dark Web include ".bitnet", ".i2p", ".bit", ".exit", and ".uucp".

Regular web-browsers can access the Dark Web via Tor2Web (https://www.tor2web.org/), but security and privacy is not guaranteed.

The Darknet has its own set of search engines since Google and Bing are designed for the Surface Internet. On the Darknet, the search engines only search the sites that want to be searched. Three popular search engines for the Darknet are Torch (http://xmh57jrzrnw6insl.onion/), DuckDuckGo (http://3g2upl4pq6kufc4m.onion/), and Tor Search (http://hss3uro2hsxfogfq.onion/) which is also called "Not Evil".

Other Darknet websites include Facebook's Onion Portal (https://www.facebookcorewwwi.onion/) and The Hidden Wiki (http://kpvz7kpmcmne52qf.onion). A list of more Darknet weblinks can be found at The Hidden Wiki on the Surface Internet (http://thehiddenwiki.org/).

A large list of Tor (Onion) I2P, and other DarkWeb links can be found at http://dcjtech.info/topic/darkweb-link-list/

Extras
To disable the webcam on a Linux system, run the below code with Root privileges.
Code:
modprobe -r uvcvideo
Further Reading
 

Attachments

Last edited:


V

Videodrome

Guest
Is there a real advantage to visiting Facebook that way? It seems like once you sign into an account you declare who you are, unless it's a second account that is bogus.
 
D

DevynCJohnson

Guest
Is there a real advantage to visiting Facebook that way? It seems like once you sign into an account you declare who you are, unless it's a second account that is bogus.
Yes, it is intended for accounts using a false identity. It can also be used for accounts with multiple users. That is how some terrorists transfer info. They get a single account and then they can all login to it (one person at a time) to post and read info.
 
V

Videodrome

Guest
It's amazing to look at a thriving Black Market and see what's out there lol. I'm surprised there isn't a Tor Craigslist.
 
D

DevynCJohnson

Guest
I'm baaaaaack..... :3 But yeah, Tor is pretty dark....... :(
It can be used for good. For instance, people in China can read about Tibetan monks thanks to Tor (yes, the Chinese government still dislikes many Tibetan practices). With any good thing comes bad.
 
S

Sean Swiggett

Guest
From what I have seen, most of it is nothing more than illegal transactions and identity protection against whistle-blowing.
 
B

blackneos940

Guest
It can be used for good. For instance, people in China can read about Tibetan monks thanks to Tor (yes, the Chinese government still dislikes many Tibetan practices). With any good thing comes bad.
Yeah, it's like ANY thing..... :) Kind of how like how certain Government Agencies, which may or may not exist, use FOSS OSs to monitor and persecute certain individuals, which may or may not exist....... :)
 
B

blackneos940

Guest
The Internet is a large place that is becoming increasingly popular and larger. The Internet provides many benefits and services. For instance, people from nearly anywhere in the world can communicate via Skype, Google+, Twitter, Facebook, and many other forums and social sites. People can also shop, learn, play, etc. However, like the physical world, people may be concerned about privacy and security. Thankfully, Tor offers great security, privacy, and more.

Getting Tor
To install the Tor Browser on Ubuntu, add the below PPA.
Code:
add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/tor-browser
Next, run the below command with Root privileges. If Tor is in the default repos of other Debian-based distros, then the below command may work without the above PPA.
Code:
apt-get update
apt-get install tor-browser
For Fedora, add the Tor repo by creating a file (/etc/yum.repos.d/tor.repo) and pacing the below code in the file. Afterwards, execute “yum install tor” in a command-line with Root privileges.
Code:
[Tor]
name=Tor Project Repo
baseurl=http://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org/rpm/fc/20/$basearch/
gpgcheck=1
enabled=1
gpgkey=http://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org/rpm/RPM-GPG-KEY-torproject.org.asc
Many installation guides can be found at https://www.torproject.org/docs/installguide.html

View attachment 2124

About Tor
Tor is open-source freeware written is C. The browser is available for all systems including Windows, Linux (and Android), OS X, iOS, and various Unixoid systems. Tor is an acronym for "The Onion Router". Tor networks are made up of "Tor Relays". When a Tor client connects to a server, a random path between the client and server is created among the Tor relays. The data is encrypted many times. Each relay decrypts the data once to get information as to where to send the data next. Then, the next relay decrypts another layer and sends the data to the next relay until the data reaches the client or server. Since the data is encrypted multiple times, the data is often compared to an onion with many layers (hence the name). This layered concept is called "Onion Routing".

NOTE: Tor relays are sometimes called Tor servers or Onion Routers.

Because of the way Tor operates, this provides users with additional security and privacy from black-hat hackers and cruel governments. Some countries restrict the sites users may view. Other countries penalize users from using certain sites. Tor provides people with the freedom they deserve. For example, China restricts its citizens from viewing Tibetan material. People that see nothing wrong with the peaceful Tibetan practices may wish to learn more about such banned subjects. Tor offers freedom that the politicians fail to give to their citizens.

FUN FACT: Edward Snowden informed the Guardian and the Washington Post about PRISM by using the Tor web-browser in June 2013.

Not only does Tor provide anonymous web browsing, but it also acts as a gateway to the Dark Web (also called the Darknet or Dark Internet). According to many sources (like The Guardian - http://www.theguardian.com/) the Darknet is larger than the Surface Internet (the Internet people are familiar with). The Dark Web is not accessible to regular web browsers like Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome (an exception is mentioned later). Rather, the Dark Web is accessible via the Tor Web-browser.
The Dark Web
The Dark Web is designed a little differently than the Surface Internet. Many websites on the Dark Web use domain names that are 16-character hashes (random characters) that make up an 80-bit number in base32 rather than purposely designed domain names (like "Wikipedia.org" or "DCJTech.info"). Also, many website domain names (or addresses) end in ".onion" instead of ".com" or ".net". JavaScript is typically disabled in the Tor browser because Darknet websites are not supposed to use JavaScript. This helps with security and privacy.

".onion" is not an official top-level-domain. However, the Dark Web uses Tor DNS servers rather than Internet DNS servers. Other possible top-level-domains on the Dark Web includes ".bitnet", ".i2p", ".bit", ".exit", and ".uucp".

Regular web-browsers can access the Dark Web via Tor2Web (https://www.tor2web.org/), but security and privacy is not guaranteed.

The Dark Web has its own set of search engine since Google and Bing are designed for the Surface Internet. On the Dark Web, the search engines only search the sites that want to be searched. Three popular search engines for the Dark Web are Torch (http://xmh57jrzrnw6insl.onion/), DuckDuckGo (http://3g2upl4pq6kufc4m.onion/), and Tor Search (http://hss3uro2hsxfogfq.onion/) which is also called "Not Evil".

Other Darknet websites include Facebook's Onion Portal (https://www.facebookcorewwwi.onion/) and The Hidden Wiki (http://kpvz7kpmcmne52qf.onion). A list of more Darknet weblinks can be found at The Hidden Wiki on the Surface Internet (http://thehiddenwiki.org/).

Extras
To disable the webcam on a Linux system, run the below code with Root privileges.
Code:
modprobe -r uvcvideo
Further Reading
Huh..... I wonder why I didn't Like this post already.....? :(
 
J

Jeroen Mathon

Guest
Tor might not be as secure as it used to be since you can track back the packets if you find the Exit Node of the onion route. That way you can trace the packets all the way back to the host it origionated from. Capturing its ip and then getting the address from the ISP. I2P and freenet are good alternatives! These two are really intersting becaouse there trully darknet(The reason being that they cache a website you visit in the dark net and then shares the cache over p2p to clients asking for that site)
 
C

Caesey

Guest
Some Great Info For Those Who Thinks Deep Web is Scam !!
Keep Posting !!
 
C

Crippled

Guest
I don't trust going to the Dark Net even using tor. There are still ways to track you.
 



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