Today's thread is intentionally short...

KGIII

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I just wanted to cover the 'halt' command. So, I did.

There isn't much to it. So, it's intentionally short. I could have made is longer but I didn't see a reason to do so.


Enjoy!

Also, don't halt your computer unless you really want to.
 


Also, don't halt your computer unless you really want to.
As you touched on in the article, I really can't think of a reason for me to use that command. Although, it kind of seems like it goes through a process that every OS should probably go through when shutting down or rebooting. But, I'm totally guessing that it would take "too much time". Or has been deemed "unnecessary".
 
As you touched on in the article, I really can't think of a reason for me to use that command. Although, it kind of seems like it goes through a process that every OS should probably go through when shutting down or rebooting. But, I'm totally guessing that it would take "too much time". Or has been deemed "unnecessary".

The same things happen when you (properly) shut down your computer. The applications are closed gracefully and the CPU is powered down. The halt command, by itself and with no flags, stops at that point. Where a shutdown command will issue an ACPI (power) shutdown command along with the graceful closing and CPU powering off. Reboot does similar, but sends an ACPI reboot command.

I'm pretty sure...
 
I never used that ... I just init 6 or init 0

Is it a Unix thing ?

Yeah, the halt command is pretty old and from Unix - back when you'd halt the system to do things like add new hardware. I think it goes back as far as the vacuum tube days.
 
That reminds me of the " park " command

Back in the 90s I got my first computer, and I remember that I needed to " park " the disk, when physically moving the machine. That was a DOS machine, I remember it ran Norton Commander
 
I remember it ran Norton Commander

If you're unaware, and want a blast from the past, we still have 'mc' available.


It's a homage to 'nc' that has existed for quite a while. One of these days, I'll do an article on the subject.
 
Ow yes, I know
I currently run Total Commander, one of the many clones

But ... nothing still beats the deep blue Norton Commander in full-screen started via DOS. Well, it's a memory anyway
 

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