Today's article compares macOS and Linux...

KGIII

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Sorta and not very well... It kinda compares the two.

See, these people kept asking if they could pay me to post an article to the site. I finally relented and told 'em that it had to be about Linux in some way. This is what they sent me back. I figured I'd give it a shot. Worst case scenario, I got a day off and Google hates the article. Best case scenario, I made a few bucks and Google tolerates the article and indexes it in a timely manner.


I dunno what good feedback will do this time around. I'll not be editing the article in any way.
 


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KGIII

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I've never tried that one and it seems to have a new name - and downloading it was too many clicks and not very intuitive. I hope it works better than they're 'modern' website. I'll play with it in a VM when I get a few minutes.
 

f33dm3bits

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You forgot to mentioned closed-source vs opensource ;)
 
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KGIII

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Condobloke

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  • Rare availability of desktop software
Really ?

Is there some remote possibility that the authors of this piece were from the Indian sub continent?
 

Bartman

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I have an Apple iMac all-in-one desktop which was given to me because the power supply failed.

I was able to repair the power supply and put the desktop back into service.

The desktop actually runs great and is very easy to navigate and I see why users swear by Apple systems.

Would I buy an Apple desktop yes I would.

I would buy a full size Apple desktop and not an all-in-one desktop which is nothing more than a disposable laptop in a monitor case.
 
D

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I would not call any of the below drawbacks of Linux.

Drawbacks of Linux OS​

  • No standard environment for the desktop usage
  • No way of proper single presentation for packaging software
  • No proper and good support for games
  • Rare availability of desktop software
I think the above are great examples of the diversity of the Linux
operating system, support for games is coming, and in any event
people playing games might not be interested in Linux or Mac,
they will flock to the system that supports their gaming needs,
which is probably better for Linux, as it won't add extra weight to
the distros, a gaming specific distro would work well for gamers though.
 

DexTheDog

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I have an Apple iMac all-in-one desktop which was given to me because the power supply failed.

I was able to repair the power supply and put the desktop back into service.

The desktop actually runs great and is very easy to navigate and I see why users swear by Apple systems.

Would I buy an Apple desktop yes I would.

I would buy a full size Apple desktop and not an all-in-one desktop which is nothing more than a disposable laptop in a monitor case.
You should try Pear OS I think it captures the experience of macos. And with the benefits of Linux.
 

Bartman

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You should try Pear OS I think it captures the experience of macos. And with the benefits of Linux.
Appreciate the suggestion however I'm happy using Linux even though some distro's lately have pissed me off with some of their new ways.

I don't care for change and I hate change.
A working distro needs no changes other than security updates.
 

DexTheDog

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Appreciate the suggestion however I'm happy using Linux even though some distro's lately have pissed me off with some of their new ways.

I don't care for change and I hate change.
A working distro needs no changes other than security updates.
PearOS is a Linux distro probably should have specified that.
 

Brickwizard

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I thought Pear died in 2014, when the developer sold all the rights to an unknown large corporation and had not been updated since,
 

Bartman

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I don't know.



 
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I thought Pear died in 2014, when the developer sold all the rights to an unknown large corporation and had not been updated since,
I thought Pear went to Apple, to be buried out of sight.
Anyway, it should be apples and oranges, where is orange os.
 
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KGIII

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Is there some remote possibility that the authors of this piece were from the Indian sub continent?

I'm pretty sure it's from that area of the globe or from eastern Europe somewhere.
 

Fanboi

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I'll not be editing the article in any way.
You really should, if possible...

james-sanity-ck "https://linux-tips.us/macos-vs-linux-comparative-analysis/"
Error: Grammar
Error: Factual accuracy
Error: Spelling
Error: Prose/style (horrendous)

Where do I begin... I started correcting it, but, TBH, re-writing it would be easier...

Corrections while trying to stay true to the article (which should be burned with fire):
macOS vs Linux: Comparative Analysis


MacOS is developed by Apple Inc. It derives much of its heart from FreeBSD. Both the userland and C libraries are predominantly FreeBSD, while the kernels contain varying amounts of BSD, mostly that of FreeBSD, code - the OS X kernel being more FreeBSD code than anything else. The OS-family is developed predominantly using the C-family languages, with the more recent inclusion of Swift. "Mac OS" was initially introduced in 1997, preceded by "System 7.5", the reasoning for the re-brand being a move away from the generic-sounding "System". In 2001, the brand had its second overhaul, as did the OS itself, becoming the first in the Mac OS X and OS X family, with the brand finally settling on "macOS" in 2016. Developed primarily in the the C-family languages, and later Swift, macOS is the second most popular Desktop OS in the USA.

The Linux kernel began its life as a side project by Linus Torvalds, with version 1.0 completed in 1991. After the source code was released, a fast-growing interest followed, leading to many homebrew operating systems which would ultimately result in the GNU OS with the Linux kernel as a then-substitute for the unreleased Hurd kernel. This combination of the GNU OS and Linux kernel quickly became the standard upon which most OSes dubbed "Linux" were based. The Linux kernel is actively developed by many different contributors from all around the world and is one of the largest open source projects of all time. This has earned it an almost irreplaceable role in everything from mobile devices and personal computers to servers and supercomputers. In 1991, the first version of Linux was introduced to the world.

Linux-based OSes, including vanilla Android, are free to use, distribute, and modify under the terms of the GPLv2 license in contrast to Windows, which became the number one most popular desktop OS in the entire world during the 1990s. MacOS, is extremely hardware-specific to Apple products to provide a seemless user experience, the target market being users looking for an easy, stable, out-of-the-box experience, with a focus on professionals rather than casual users. The cost of macOS is often misattributed to the OS itself, without taking into account the ecosystem and physical hardware that come with it. Thus, Windows is seen as a more affordable option within the mainstream desktop market.

The sections below explore the diffences and similarities between macOS and GNU Linux OSes more in-depth, giving one a clearer picture as to one's needs.

Is it good to use macOS and Linux together?
Generally, using a dual-boot system is cumbersome and using two separate machines is more practical. Given the number of very light-weight Linux-based OSes that will run on some of the older, low-spec hardware at reasonable to optimal performance, this option is very low-cost for basic desktop use.

Is it possible to switch to macOS from Linux?
Reasonably, depending on the Linux OS one is most accustomed to from a GUI standpoint. On the CLI side, Bash is available on macOS for those less familiar with zsh.

Which is safer – Linux or macOS?
Any system is as vulnerable as its user, but not as secure as its user. This dichotomy leads to macOS being the most secure OS for the less savvy user, while the beginner, intermediate, and advanced user will benefit greatly from the fuller control over the system that most GNU Linux provide, along with the much higher level of public scrutiny due to the nature of open source code.

Is it possible to install Linux on an old iMac?
Yes. Although this is limited to lighter-weight distros (Linux OSes) that maintain support for older architectures, most specifically PowerPC.

Which version of Linux is good to use with macOS?
Generally, distros with similar GUIs. That said, for users who are comfortable with the CLI, and those willing to learn, the sky is the limit

Drawbacks of Linux OS
No standard graphical environment between all distros.
Incomplete support for software, especially games, designed only for Windows (though lots of progress has been made and most modern games either have native support or work with minimal effort via the PlayOnLinux frontend.

Downsides of macOS
Much less choice and customisation of the OS's UIs (both graphical and command-driven).
Less control over granular security.
Less scalability.

Why should you go for Linux in comparison to Mac?

GNU Linux is more cost-effective and can be better hardened security-wise by even the mildly savvy user. GNU Linux is also far more user-customisable. GNU Linux boasts a lot of software that is not available on MacOS, most commonly software developed for Windows and only ported to Linux OSes through open source community efforts.

If I was thrown into a room and forced to write this piece in my own words:
# macOS vs Linux: Comparative Analysis

MacOS, despite some releases not officially, being classed as "UNIX", is in fact UNIX for the most part. Linux, or GNU Linux to be more accurate, is explicitly not. The Linux kernel itself is "Unix-alike" and the GNU OS's acronym is recursively "Gnu is Not Unix". While macOS has most of its roots in FreeBSD, a true UNIX developed as a complete and integrated system, the OSes that carry the name "Linux" mostly consist of a Linux kernel and separate userland (most commonly GNU), making them somewhat less cohesive.

The Linux kernel began its life as a side project by Linus Torvalds, a single developer and student at the time. On the other hand, FreeBSD and its family and their ancestry were developed by multiple programmers and computer engineers with the goal being a complete Of note, too: GNU Linux consists of two parts with very different goals; Torvalds's, to simply create a viable kernel together with the GNU Project's goal of a full-blown OS.

Linux-based OSes, including vanilla Android, are free to use, distribute, and modify under the terms of the GPLv2 license in contrast to macOS, which is designed exclusively to run on Apple's devices at a cost to the end user, both financially and privacy-, freedom-, and security-wise.

## Pros and Cons

MacOS definitely provides a better experience for professionals who are not very tech savvy. The operating system is also guaranteed to be compatible with the hardware since it is designed specifically for Apple devices' hardware configuration. MacOS is also a complete, integrated system and has an array of professional and enterprise-level software available.

That said, macOS offers a less entensive set of tools to allow users to manage their own security. Its closed-source components also bring to light security issues. The OS also has a more limited hardware support since it intentionally designed not to run on non-Apple devices. Privacy is a major concern due to the many controversies Apple has been embroiled in regarding user privacy and security over the years. And without fully open source code to audit, users cannot patch holes in security, nor disable privacy-infringing features. There is also much less choice when it comes to macOS and its software components, both at system and user levels, and the work environment is largely homogenised - though some may consider this as a positive feature.

GNU Linux is definitely the winner for the more educated user. Not only can a more knowledgeable user configure superior security, but they're able to ensure trust and privacy due to the open source ecosystem. As for the UI, the CLI is as good or bad as on macOS, and the GUI of certain desktop environments like XFCE can be customised to mimic the feel of macOS, leaving little advantage for macOS in the base system. Linux-based systems also technically have better hardware support since they are designed for general use and more specific applications such as mobile devices, servers, and even supercomputers. Finally, most Linux OSes have one thing in common: freedom. Freedom to do anything you want to your OS, be it good or bad, stupid or smart, or silly or serious.

That said, Linux systems, Android aside, are still substantially lagging in the gaming sector. Linux systems also have a mildly steeper learning curve. Linux systems also have the disadvantage of making one almost incapable of transitioning back to traditional OSes. And while Linux does boast better and more comprehensive hardware support, it still lags substantially behind Windows. As for gaming, the software needed to play Windows games on Linux systems has lots of maturing still to do. Finally, most Linux systems offer a lot of choice, from system configuration to system component software, to desktop applications. To a newcomer and unsavvy person, this can be overwhelming.

## Verdict

In closing, comparing the two systems is somewhat like trying to compare the moon to a cup of tea in terms of sheer pointlessness. Nobody (sane) who buys an Apple product would do so merely to run Linux. And few, if any, would genuinely spend the time and effort to make macOS work on non-Apple products (the Hackintosh) other than to impress people on Youtube or TikTok. They both have their roles. MacOS is a professional OS the ships with overpriced products designed for professionals. That said, the software available for macOS is triple-A industry standard. While Linux systems can compete, they will never be as integrated, and it is unlikely that more than a handful of software vendors will support Linux systems any time soon, largely because of the fragmented nature of the ecosystem and inconsistency across distros. However, one can fully trust one's PC running Linux distros because the open source model is designed to ensure scrutiny and thus accountability for any incompetent or malicious contributors. At the end of the day, it's up to the user's needs and value system, and very subjective, rendering the debate a fairly pointless one.

Lol, either way, it's a cheap, space-filler. The kind of thing that exists purely as a front for pop-up adverts or sites promoting services/products with reference links. Definitely not written by a native English speaker... at least not a sober one.


...Well, that was a fun exercise in futility. Still, having been unplugged for months, writing something was fun, albeit for no real reason other than personal amusement.
 
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gvisoc

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It's probably a good idea to state that the article is a guest article, in some way. A statement like that, missing, and the fact that you, @KGIII, are listed as the author (as probably you were the CMS user that submitted the text), is really misleading.

Screenshot from 2022-05-25 17-10-41.png
 
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