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Sudo password

Discussion in 'Linux Security' started by hitlr society, Dec 2, 2018.

  1. hitlr society

    hitlr society New Member

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    i mean, login to sudo not using password user but using password special sudo..
    is there a special password for sudo?


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  2. wizardfromoz

    wizardfromoz Super Moderator
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    hitlr society likes this.
  3. hitlr society

    hitlr society New Member

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    I'm using Debian 9 Stretch
     
  4. wizardfromoz

    wizardfromoz Super Moderator
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    Installation of Debian 9 'Stretch' provides for the choice of using a separate password for Root.

    Did you choose that?

    Is that what you are asking about?

    Wizard
     
  5. hitlr society

    hitlr society New Member

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    i'm not choose separate password for Root.

    Example:
    i as user root and add new user (user_1) with permission sudo.

    When i as user_1 interact with terminal command line.

    Sudo nano /etc

    Debian will prompt for current user's password..

    My question..

    Can i setting password sudo without password current user's.?
    But with password for special sudo.. So, when i enter mode sudo i should enter password for sudo not with password current user
     
  6. arochester

    arochester Gold Member
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    Not sure that I fully understand this.

    Debian Wiki says
    ...and
     
  7. Rob

    Rob Administrator
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    Are you asking if you can set a user to use sudo without prompting for a password?
     
  8. JTHR

    JTHR New Member

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    I think the question is something like this...
    Windows has an option to have Standard User A and Admin User B
    When logged into Standard User A you need to enter Admin User B's password to preform administrative tasks.
    Can you have a similar thing with Debian as You login with Standard User A and enter the "root" password which would be Admin User B's password in the example above.
     
  9. Rob

    Rob Administrator
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    Here - let's cover a couple different things regardless of which Linux distribution you're using.

    Let's state some facts first..
    - every system will have a root user
    - you should NOT do day-to-day activities as the root user since accidents happen - not only something like deleting important system files, but you may end up creating new files owned by just root which may impact a regular user's use of a certain application in the future.

    Enter sudo - this tool lets otherwise unprivileged users perform actions in which root would otherwise only have access. For instance, editing the /etc/hosts file.

    As a regular user, you can open the file in an editor like vim (nano, emacs, etc..), you can even view the contents with tools like less/more/cat/etc.. but in order to actually save changes to it, you'll need to edit it with root privileges.

    This is where sudo comes in. Generally, when you add a regular/unprivileged user during installation, they are added to the sudoers file. When you get into a jam, you can use sudo to get things done..

    Let's say 'joe' wants to edit the /etc/hosts file. He would get it done by typing:
    Code:
    sudo vim /etc/hosts
    It will then prompt him for a password - here you'll input joe's password (not the root password).

    As long as joe is in the sudoers file and the password was correct (and the sudoers file isn't limiting him to certain commands) the file will open and he'll be able to change it and write it as the same filename.

    If you trust your system (ie: within your home network, no one else uses it, you have it VERY secure), then you can modify the sudoers file so that joe never has to enter a password for the sudo command..

    You can edit the sudoers file by typing:
    Code:
    sudo visudo
    This will open in your system's default editor.

    Scroll down and change:
    Code:
    joe ALL=(ALL) ALL
    to:
    Code:
    joe ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:ALL
    Now, when joe runs 'sudo' it won't ask him for a password.
     
  10. Lazydog

    Lazydog Member

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    My question is why would you want this? SUDO allows you to set limits on what the SUDO can and cannot do when using the command.

    Also you don't want one user to know another users password as this is unsafe.
     

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