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Stable arch derivative

SeanK

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Having had a few bad experiences with Manjaro recently, I'm looking for a new user friendly Arch derivative thats "stable". Does anyone have any suggestions, positive experiences?
 


Brickwizard

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I am not an Arch fan, but Endeavour OS seems to be quite popular
 

Bartman

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EndeavourOS for the most offers good stability however with a rolling / semi rolling release you are going to occasionally run into problems it's just the nature of a rolling / semi rolling release.


If you want reliability and stability than choose and use one of the LTS Linux distros.
 

f33dm3bits

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However with a rolling / semi rolling release you are going to occasionally run into problems it's just the nature of a rolling / semi rolling release.
Even point of release distributions have things break, it's the nature of updating software since programmers are human they make mistakes too and can't over see every variable. I've had things break a few times with Arch but nothing serious that a downgrade of something couldn't fix.
 

captain-sensible

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i used EndeavorOS for a short while before moving to Vanilla Arch ; great experience while I had it and Endeavor web has some helpful hints to install etc
 

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if your really concerned about stability you need to select a non rolling release model such as Debian, Mint, Ubuntu LTS Or OpenSuSE Leap. If you want cutting edge then you will have to put up with the occasional breakage. But they are usually fixed quite fast. It's your choice and it's great to have it.
As already said any distro can be broken from time to time by software updates.
 
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SeanK

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Regrettably the problems I've had with Manjaro have grown worse and worse and I'll add I'm not alone in saying that. Its regrettable but its time to move on. I was hoping to tap into someone elses experience with other Arch distros, I may consider pure Arch but have heard its a challenge to set up.
 

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I ran Endeavour OS for a while to test it long-term. Loved it initially (as a secondary system), but eventually ran into package conflicts. Upon further inspection, Endeavour is not as "pure" as it could/should be. It's an upgrade to Archbuntu ahem, I mean Manjaro, but sadly still not perfect. It still has some non-pure components (just take an older ISO, install it and run an upgrade, you'll see).
I'm not saying it's bad, but if you're willing to put in the time to manually fix a package upgrade/conflict/etc. issue in EndeavourOS/Manjaro/SomeOtherDistro, you may as well pour that energy into installing Arch. Installing Arch is not "difficult" or "technical" or anything. This is a myth. It's actually, IMHO, easier than installing FreeBSD. Just follow one of thousands of recent tutorial videos if you're not confident. I think people find the "building it up" bit daunting. I won't lie, it's tedious setting up a working desktop environment after installing Arch (and that's why I had high hopes for Endeavour OS), but I'd rather put in the extra 20-30min setting up a basic graphical desktop and have a working system. If you want Arch, use Arch, not an Arch-derivative. Consider how much time Manjaro has now wasted: installing, troubleshooting, migrating data/settings, reinstalling another OS. You could've learned how to install Arch in a 5 minute YT video.

One question: Why do you want to run Arch? If you want something bleeding edge that's "easy" and light, just install a base Debian and set the repo to Sid (contrary to popular belief, it's better than testing because you'll get fixes quicker and both can still break and testing is still a little dated), run a full upgrade, then build up your system. Debian has some DE meta-packages that make life very easy and it's a well-supported distro. The only benefit from Arch is more software from AUR, but when you use AUR, you are inviting a little bit of breakage/conflict here and there. That's the nature of Arch.

Make a list of your software needs, choose 3 distros that meet your other needs. Then check them for all the software you want and the first one with everything wins. Don't forget you can use Appimages for any distro where packages are missing.
 

wizardfromoz

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Sean

I run 76 Linux distros, with 14 of them being Arch-based.

If you don't think you'll ever likely be wanting to dual-boot or multi-boot a number of Linux alongside each other, then the following is of no interest, but if you do, read on.

Most (but not all) Arch-based distros are fine to multiboot multiple distros when they/it is the Primary Partition, that is, it is on top of your Grub Menu.

However, following a number of changes that can include kernel upgrades and so forth, that spot of Primary can change, and when that does, you will find that trying to open your Arch-based distro will fail, with a Kernel Panic.

I have dealt elsewhere with a workaround for this, involving generating a file called

custom.cfg

that can be added to your Grub Menu, and allows the Arch-based distro to boot normally.

https://www.linux.org/threads/insta...e-other-distro-then-kernel-panic-later.37780/

Related to the above issue, and your issue, the following may help:

1. Salient OS is one Arch-based example which appears stable in my experience so far, and has no difficulty with the kernel panic scenario.

2. We have three (3) maintainers/developers of Linux Distros within our ranks, and two (2) of them are relevant here. One is not Arch-based, but it will allow any Arch-based distro to open from its Grub Menu without kernel panic, and that is Gecko Linux , based on openSUSE, and maintained by Sam aka @GeckoLinux .

Under Gecko's Grub Menu, you can open any Arch-based distro I have in my stable.

The other worth noting, for stability, has been mentioned, and that is

3. Endeavour OS and its developer, Joe Kamprad, as I have said, is a member. I like Endeavour.

I would be remiss in saying that you have not described the issues you have with Manjaro, perhaps I can assist.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 
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SeanK

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I ran Endeavour OS for a while to test it long-term. Loved it initially (as a secondary system), but eventually ran into package conflicts. Upon further inspection, Endeavour is not as "pure" as it could/should be. It's an upgrade to Archbuntu ahem, I mean Manjaro, but sadly still not perfect. It still has some non-pure components (just take an older ISO, install it and run an upgrade, you'll see).
I'm not saying it's bad, but if you're willing to put in the time to manually fix a package upgrade/conflict/etc. issue in EndeavourOS/Manjaro/SomeOtherDistro, you may as well pour that energy into installing Arch. Installing Arch is not "difficult" or "technical" or anything. This is a myth. It's actually, IMHO, easier than installing FreeBSD. Just follow one of thousands of recent tutorial videos if you're not confident. I think people find the "building it up" bit daunting. I won't lie, it's tedious setting up a working desktop environment after installing Arch (and that's why I had high hopes for Endeavour OS), but I'd rather put in the extra 20-30min setting up a basic graphical desktop and have a working system. If you want Arch, use Arch, not an Arch-derivative. Consider how much time Manjaro has now wasted: installing, troubleshooting, migrating data/settings, reinstalling another OS. You could've learned how to install Arch in a 5 minute YT video.

One question: Why do you want to run Arch? If you want something bleeding edge that's "easy" and light, just install a base Debian and set the repo to Sid (contrary to popular belief, it's better than testing because you'll get fixes quicker and both can still break and testing is still a little dated), run a full upgrade, then build up your system. Debian has some DE meta-packages that make life very easy and it's a well-supported distro. The only benefit from Arch is more software from AUR, but when you use AUR, you are inviting a little bit of breakage/conflict here and there. That's the nature of Arch.

Make a list of your software needs, choose 3 distros that meet your other needs. Then check them for all the software you want and the first one with everything wins. Don't forget you can use Appimages for any distro where packages are missing.
Archbuntu LOL. I have both Arch derivative in the form of Manjaro and Mint LMDE based laptops. Both have been really good but for some reason the last 12 months has seen a lot of bugs surface in Manjaro that simply hang around. Troubleshooting has become a full time pass time. So moving on.

I may well just install pure Arch or possibly Arcolinx which, in spite of its confusing array of options, looks to have a lot of potential.

Yeah I like light and fast so I use an Arch base for my main laptop. I have a lot of time for the AUR too. Thanks for the advice, its helpful to hear what other people have experienced.
 
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SeanK

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Sean

I run 76 Linux distros, with 14 of them being Arch-based.

If you don't think you'll ever likely be wanting to dual-boot or multi-boot a number of Linux alongside each other, then the following is of no interest, but if you do, read on.

Most (but not all) Arch-based distros are fine to multiboot multiple distros when they/it is the Primary Partition, that is, it is on top of your Grub Menu.

However, following a number of changes that can include kernel upgrades and so forth, that spot of Primary can change, and when that does, you will find that trying to open your Arch-based distro will fail, with a Kernel Panic.

I have dealt elsewhere with a workaround for this, involving generating a file called

custom.cfg

that can be added to your Grub Menu, and allows the Arch-based distro to boot normally.

https://www.linux.org/threads/insta...e-other-distro-then-kernel-panic-later.37780/

Related to the above issue, and your issue, the following may help:

1. Salient OS is one Arch-based example which appears stable in my experience so far, and has no difficulty with the kernel panic scenario.

2. We have three (3) maintainers/developers of Linux Distros within our ranks, and two (2) of them are relevant here. One is not Arch-based, but it will allow any Arch-based distro to open from its Grub Menu without kernel panic, and that is Gecko Linux , based on openSUSE, and maintained by Sam aka @GeckoLinux .

Under Gecko's Grub Menu, you can open any Arch-based distro I have in my stable.

The other worth noting, for stability, has been mentioned, and that is

3. Endeavour OS and its developer, Joe Kamprad, as I have said, is a member. I like Endeavour.

I would be remiss in saying that you have not described the issues you have with Manjaro, perhaps I can assist.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
Hi Chris,

76 , that must keep you busy! I mostly have no issue trouble shooting Manjaro its just gotten to the point where, on balance, its not worth it anymore, as the problems keeps multiplying. I will say if anyone knows how to use Formost to recover files any advice there would be appreciated. I have posted already asking for help.

Endeavour did catch my attention. Lots of positive comments on Distrowatch and Youtube. I'll do some research on Salient OS. I've heard the name but never tried it. OpenSUSE I do know and have run in the past. Its excellent but if memory serves its an independent release. Not Arch. Still will have a look at Gecko too.

As it stands I'm gravitating towards Arcolinux but will keep an open mind based on suggestions.

Thanks for the feedback.
 
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SeanK

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if your really concerned about stability you need to select a non rolling release model such as Debian, Mint, Ubuntu LTS Or OpenSuSE Leap. If you want cutting edge then you will have to put up with the occasional breakage. But they are usually fixed quite fast. It's your choice and it's great to have it.
As already said any distro can be broken from time to time by software updates.
Honestly I have had few issues with Arch/Manjaro in terms of stability until this year. On balance I I typically find it no more or less stable than say Ubuntu based Mint which was my go to for a long time until it became less stable/buggy.
 
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SeanK

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i used EndeavorOS for a short while before moving to Vanilla Arch ; great experience while I had it and Endeavor web has some helpful hints to install etc
Was installation difficult, I have heard pure Arch requires some effort?
 
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SeanK

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Arch Linux by design is a rolling release, unlike Debian which uses static package versions and updates are geared toward security then software upgrades
I've mostly had a really good experience with Arch which is why I'm keen to keep using it. I do have Debian in the form of Mint LMDE on another laptop and its excellent too but lacks things I love about Arch.
 
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SeanK

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Even point of release distributions have things break, it's the nature of updating software since programmers are human they make mistakes too and can't over see every variable. I've had things break a few times with Arch but nothing serious that a downgrade of something couldn't fix.
That has been true for me until this year.
 
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SeanK

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EndeavourOS for the most offers good stability however with a rolling / semi rolling release you are going to occasionally run into problems it's just the nature of a rolling / semi rolling release.


If you want reliability and stability than choose and use one of the LTS Linux distros.
Thanks, definitely considering Endeavour.
 

captain-sensible

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Was installation difficult, I have heard pure Arch requires some effort?
Like a lot of things its partly about approach, being cautious, prudent and doing a lot of reading and cross-referencing with other material . Personally i found just entering commands manually step by step easier than following some auto help install. Maybe though they have fixed some issues i see this : https://www.debugpoint.com/2022/01/archinstall-guide/

my rough notes are here: https://linux.org/threads/manual-install-vanilla-arch.36358/

been using Arch vanilla now for about a year I think; next to no problems so far
 
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SeanK

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That is very helpful. Thanks. I may just go for the original rather than a derivative. Funnily enough I also have an old HP mini laptop I transferred to Linux Mint after lots of aggravation with Windows 8.Its never run better.
 

Fanboi

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3. Endeavour OS and its developer, Joe Kamprad, as I have said, is a member. I like Endeavour.
Darnit, I wish I had know while I was test driving it a while ago, I could've sent him the bugs. I remember vaguely the bricking began with a dependency/upgrade issue that affected zenity (or was it notify-send? Sure it was zenity) among others. For future reference, what's his handle (if you're allowed to publish that by connection a name to a handle -- usually it's okay when people "put themselves out there").

I would be remiss in saying that you have not described the issues you have with Manjaro, perhaps I can assist.
Fair point. TBH, I missed that angle. Actually very valid. Surprised nobody else gave your post a like for that suggestion.

That all said, I still stand by the switch to pure Arch or another distro. But that's my own experiences talking.
 
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