Sound Recently Crapped Out (Solved)



SpongebobFan1994

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But David didn't you say #16 bare metal ?
Because a number of people in this thread believe I've contradicted myself, I'll put this way. 99% of the time its running on bare metal. Its only that 1% where I have to transfer from a VM to bare metal. Does that make more sense to everyone?

Also, I thought this was supposed to be about fixing a sound issue?
 

Condobloke

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History of this topic.....

You can try booting to a Live USB and see if the issue persists.

Tolkem said:
You can try booting to a Live USB and see if the issue persists.
.......I can, but I wouldn't know how to burn Mint onto a USB.....(your answer)

All sorts of comments about pulse audio etc etc etc

@Nelson Muntz then offered multiple suggestions re how to "burn" Mint onto a usb stick
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
One of them.... https://linuxmint-installation-guide.readthedocs.io/en/latest/burn.html ...I think is a good one. It uses Mint to do the job of adding/burning the iso file to the usb stick and makes it bootable.

SO......using the Mint that you have installed.......


How to make a bootable USB stick
In Linux Mint
Right-click the ISO file and select Make Bootable USB Stick, or launch Menu ‣ Accessories ‣ USB Image Writer.
_images/mintstick.png
Select your USB device and click Write.

(MAKE SURE you have selected the usb stick/device to write the file to.)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

BOOT Linux MInt

Now that you have Linux Mint on a USB stick boot the computer from it.

  1. Insert your USB stick into the computer.
  2. Restart the computer.
  3. Before your computer boots your current operating system (Windows, Mac, Linux) you should see your BIOS loading screen. Check the screen or your computer’s documentation to know which key to press and instruct your computer to boot on USB.

Most BIOS have a special key you can press to select the boot device and all of them have a special key to enter the BIOS configuration screen (from which you can define the boot order). Depending on the BIOS, these special keys can be Escape, F1, F2, F8, F10, F11, F12, or Delete. That information is usually briefly written on the screen during the boot sequence.

USUALLY on a LENOVO, it will be either the F8, F10, or F12

THIS PIC is of MY pc. Yours will look different ...but the basics should at least be similar....Note the "PRESS F11 for BOOT MENU......at that instant...you will need to tap either the f8, f10 or f12 key ON YOUR PC...you may end up rebooting many, many times to find the correct key and to get the timing right
bios screen.jpg


When you get the timing right and the correct key you will be taken to something like the pic Below...
select boot device.jpg


On this screen I will arrow down to uefi:VerbatimSTORE N GO 5.00 partition 2....THE NAME ETC OF YOUR USB WILL BE DIFFERENT.....again it may take some "over and over" work to find the right one. Be patient. It will work.

It will then mo=ve on to a screen giving you a choice of doinf various thyings....the TOP choice will be to Boot to LINUX MINT. ...Either click enter to select that or you can just wait 8 seconds or whatever it is and it will automatically go to the top choice anyway.

AT this point you are running linux mint LIVE. It is NOT installed....it is running in memory from the usb stick.

DOES YOUR SOUND WORK ????

If it DOES work....hooray !...Success !

The next step is to INSTALL that Linux Mint.
There is an icon on the desktop which simply says.....'Install Linux Mint'
Double click it. Follow the prompts.
Seeing you are using Linux mint only, just allow it to use the entire disk. It will automatically take care of partitioning and wiping the old install on the hard drive etc etc etce etc
 

wizardfromoz

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Seeing you are using Linux mint only...
I am not certain that is the case, perhaps David can clarify that for us.

David, first up I would follow Brian's blow-by-blow on how to burn and boot from a Live USB (or you can use the same with a DVD if you have an optical drive).

See about the sound issue first and then we can proceed from there.

I will be back with more soon.

Wiz
 

wizardfromoz

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David, Brian was good enough to give us a small summary of the Thread so far, but there's an area not looked at properly that I would like you to help us with, and that is, bare metal.

I don't think you know properly what that refers to, and that is no crime in itself. There are so many technical terms, slang and lingo "out there" that it is hard to keep track, even when you are a Wizard.

Plainly speaking - if someone gives you, or you acquire, a PC or laptop that has been wiped clean of its operating system, or you buy one from a store that has never had an OS on it ... THAT is bare metal.

It has the hardware components in place, and a working power system, and a BIOS functionality that, when powered up, may bring you to a logo for the manufacturer, and so on, and go not much further.

A program known in one way or another as FDISK may have been applied to clean it off ready for new use.

If you Google up

what is bare metal

you will get a good idea, but don't be sidetracked with the references to bare metal hypervisor/server articles, that's a bit different.

With your bare metal setup, you can then choose to install Windows, or Linux, or Macintosh, or BSD, or other OS, using such a medium as the rig allows for, whether that be USB stick or optical medium such as CD/DVD (mostly DVD these days).

On completion of your installation you can power down and power up, or restart your computer/laptop and hopefully now have a working OS to play or work with.

When you were asked

Are you running Linux Mint in bare metal or inside a VM?
your answer was

I always run it on bare metal
If you follow what I described above, then that does not make sense. Once the system is on, then your rig is no longer bare metal, and won't be again, unless you wipe and FDISK your computer and install a different OS, or pass it on/sell it in that bare metal state.

If you are running your Mint in a VM, such as VirtualBox (owned by Oracle) or VMWare (owned by Dell), or other VM software, then your Mint is the Guest, in a Host that is running off Windows, or Linux, or Macintosh, or BSD, or other OS.

You can't have a VM running off bare metal.

And if you did put Linux onto your your computer in a bare metal state, you would have to know how to have burned an .iso to either of a USB stick or a DVD. Which you say you don't.

To cut a long story short, we need to know under what environment you are running your current Linux Mint, the one that is experiencing audio (sound) issues.

Is it in a VM on a machine running Windows or other OS?

Is it fully installed to your hard drive, by some who has used a USB stick?

If the latter is the case, is Linux the only OS on the computer or is it also running Windows - dual booting?

But answer Brian's question first.

Thanks

Wizard
 

SpongebobFan1994

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David, Brian was good enough to give us a small summary of the Thread so far, but there's an area not looked at properly that I would like you to help us with, and that is, bare metal.

I don't think you know properly what that refers to, and that is no crime in itself. There are so many technical terms, slang and lingo "out there" that it is hard to keep track, even when you are a Wizard.

Plainly speaking - if someone gives you, or you acquire, a PC or laptop that has been wiped clean of its operating system, or you buy one from a store that has never had an OS on it ... THAT is bare metal.

It has the hardware components in place, and a working power system, and a BIOS functionality that, when powered up, may bring you to a logo for the manufacturer, and so on, and go not much further.

A program known in one way or another as FDISK may have been applied to clean it off ready for new use.

If you Google up

what is bare metal

you will get a good idea, but don't be sidetracked with the references to bare metal hypervisor/server articles, that's a bit different.

With your bare metal setup, you can then choose to install Windows, or Linux, or Macintosh, or BSD, or other OS, using such a medium as the rig allows for, whether that be USB stick or optical medium such as CD/DVD (mostly DVD these days).

On completion of your installation you can power down and power up, or restart your computer/laptop and hopefully now have a working OS to play or work with.

When you were asked



your answer was



If you follow what I described above, then that does not make sense. Once the system is on, then your rig is no longer bare metal, and won't be again, unless you wipe and FDISK your computer and install a different OS, or pass it on/sell it in that bare metal state.

If you are running your Mint in a VM, such as VirtualBox (owned by Oracle) or VMWare (owned by Dell), or other VM software, then your Mint is the Guest, in a Host that is running off Windows, or Linux, or Macintosh, or BSD, or other OS.

You can't have a VM running off bare metal.

And if you did put Linux onto your your computer in a bare metal state, you would have to know how to have burned an .iso to either of a USB stick or a DVD. Which you say you don't.

To cut a long story short, we need to know under what environment you are running your current Linux Mint, the one that is experiencing audio (sound) issues.

Is it in a VM on a machine running Windows or other OS?

Is it fully installed to your hard drive, by some who has used a USB stick?

If the latter is the case, is Linux the only OS on the computer or is it also running Windows - dual booting?

But answer Brian's question first.

Thanks

Wizard
Thanks a lot for clearing that up. I'll admit I got confused over the terminology, and now I owe everyone, especially @Tolkem, an apology for the confusion.

Linux is fully installed on my computer and is the only OS on it.
 

Tolkem

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Linux is fully installed on my computer and is the only OS on it
That's a better answer. Now, do you see if the audio is being reproduced, but there's no output? I still think you need to boot Mint from a USB stick, and check whether the issue still persists. If it does, it's probably a hardware problem, and you might need to find a replacement, i.e. a USB dongle audio device. If it doesn't, there might be a number of things that could be causing the issue. Launch a terminal, and type this
Code:
pactl info
press Enter, and copy/paste the output in your reply. Also, you haven't said the pc's audio card model, that might be helpful too.
@wizardfromoz I always thought the term "bare metal" referred to a physical device rather than a virtual one, and not necessarily a "new empty one" as you described.
 

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wizardfromoz

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I alluded to that briefly when I said

...but don't be sidetracked with the references to bare metal hypervisor/server articles, that's a bit different.
:)
 
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