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Sound not working on any Linux distro with Zenbook 14 OLED

jack9389

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Hello,

I recently bought an Asus Zenbook 14 OLED (UX3402ZA) and the speakers are not working at all on any Linux distribution. I've tried openSUSE, Ubuntu (I'm currently running it), Fedora KDE but no dice.

Here's some info about my system:
uname -a:
Code:
Linux zenbook 5.15.0-41-generic #44-Ubuntu SMP Wed Jun 22 14:20:53 UTC 2022 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

aplay -a:
Code:
card 0: sofhdadsp [sof-hda-dsp], device 0: HDA Analog (*) []
  Subdevices: 1/1
  Subdevice #0: subdevice #0
card 0: sofhdadsp [sof-hda-dsp], device 1: HDA Digital (*) []
  Subdevices: 1/1
  Subdevice #0: subdevice #0
card 0: sofhdadsp [sof-hda-dsp], device 3: HDMI1 (*) []
  Subdevices: 1/1
  Subdevice #0: subdevice #0
card 0: sofhdadsp [sof-hda-dsp], device 4: HDMI2 (*) []
  Subdevices: 1/1
  Subdevice #0: subdevice #0
card 0: sofhdadsp [sof-hda-dsp], device 5: HDMI3 (*) []
  Subdevices: 1/1
  Subdevice #0: subdevice #0

Inxi -a:
Code:
Audio:
  Device-1: Intel Alder Lake PCH-P High Definition Audio
    driver: sof-audio-pci-intel-tgl
  Sound Server-1: ALSA v: k5.15.0-41-generic running: yes
  Sound Server-2: PulseAudio v: 15.99.1 running: yes
  Sound Server-3: PipeWire v: 0.3.48 running: yes

I also tried the solutions discussed in this thread: https://www.linux.org/threads/solve...altek-hd-audio-problem.27384/#google_vignette
Still no luck.

That said, I've seen many more threads on various forums from users which have a similar or the same laptop as me, reporting that their audio is also not working. Some examples:

I desperately need help fixing the audio. The laptop shipped with Windows 11 and the speakers worked perfectly, until I decided to install Linux. I really don't wanna go back to Windows but if this can't be fixed I'll have to :(...
 


[Julian]

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Hello,

same issue - almost same device (UM3402YA - 5.18.15-arch1-2). I want to share the information I have gathered.

Possible cause
I hope I'm on the right track...
If I understand this thread correctly the sound system on this device is composed of multiple sound cards (CS35L41) and a connector node (CSC3551) - https://superuser.com/questions/1719920/.
The connector node (CSC3551), which is connected to the CPU via the i2c-bus, doesn't seem to be supported yet.

Possible patch?
There was communication between the kernel devs and somebody working for Cirrus (the manufacturer of the sound system) about supporting this sound configuration - https://patchwork.kernel.org/[email protected]/.
Where the kernel devs concluded:
As the ic2-multi-instantiate patch chain is still being worked out, we would like to submit a new chain for CLSA0100 id and a few fixes for the HDA cs35l41 driver. And to avoid conflicts the ic2-multi-instantiate patch chain will wait for this new patch chain to be merged.
Ok, so the CSC3551 has to wait for patches of the CS35L41?

I don't have the knowledge to apply any of the changes made to the kernel. I don't want to go back to Windows neither so I guess we just have to wait for the kernel patch except someone comes up with a fix.
 

sanjibukai

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Hello..
I just got an Asus Zenbook Pro Duo UX582..
And I also tried many distros without success with that same issue.. Having no sound :(
I also do not want to go back to windows

Does anyone have any news?

I couldn't believe there's no way to fix that...
FWIW I tried with Manjaro kernel 6.0.2, Endeavour 6.0.6, Fedora 5.19 and Pop OS (latest version - forgot the kernel version)
 

NORD

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have you gone into sounds settings and switch it from headphomes to device speakers? what have you done?
 

Lord Boltar

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Open the file In root -
Code:
sudo texteditor /etc/modprobe.d/alsa-base.conf
- where it says texteditor use whatever one you are using gedit, nano, mousepad, etc - now add the entry -
Code:
options snd-hda-intel model=asus-zenbook
- save the file and reboot

it may only be a partial solution, the volume control might still be glitchy
 
Last edited:

pokhrelashok2

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Open the file In root -
Code:
sudo texteditor /etc/modprobe.d/alsa-base.conf
- where it says texteditor use whatever one you are using gedit, nano, mousepad, etc - now add the entry -
Code:
options snd-hda-intel model=asus-zenbook
- save the file and reboot

it may only be a partial solution, the volume control might still be glitchy
didn't work for me even after updating to kernel 6.0.6
 

Lord Boltar

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pokhrelashok2

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Lord Boltar

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What config do i use for building the kernal? Do i generate config from my hardware?
The easiest way to create a new file is to copy an existing one and modify it. Usually the best choice on most platforms is the GENERIC configuration, as it contains most drivers and options
The modification of a kernel configuration file basically involves three operations:
1)support for hardware devices is included/excluded in the kernel (for example, SCSI support can be removed if it is not needed.)
2) support for kernel features is enabled/disabled (for example, enable NFS client support, enable Linux compatibility, ...)
3) tuning kernel parameters.
 

pokhrelashok2

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The easiest way to create a new file is to copy an existing one and modify it. Usually the best choice on most platforms is the GENERIC configuration, as it contains most drivers and options
The modification of a kernel configuration file basically involves three operations:
1)support for hardware devices is included/excluded in the kernel (for example, SCSI support can be removed if it is not needed.)
2) support for kernel features is enabled/disabled (for example, enable NFS client support, enable Linux compatibility, ...)
3) tuning kernel parameters.
Okay building the kernel now. Will let you know if it helps. By the way how is building kernel by myself different from installing a kernel from ubuntu mainline kernel?
 

Lord Boltar

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Okay building the kernel now. Will let you know if it helps. By the way how is building kernel by myself different from installing a kernel from ubuntu mainline kernel?
The Ubuntu/Canonical team backports bug fixes and support of some new hardware from the latest mainline kernels, and also does other improvements. The difference between these kernels are some configuration changes, source patches, and, in some cases, compiled in modules and hardware support. Where when you build it yourself you have to add those things manually very little of the underlying code is different from upstream other than these configuration changes
 

sanjibukai

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sanjibukai

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Okay building the kernel now. Will let you know if it helps. By the way how is building kernel by myself different from installing a kernel from ubuntu mainline kernel?
Hey, can you update your case?
And if you don't mind, can you link any guide or tutorial you followed to build your own kernel with that patch?
 
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