[Solved] Linux Mint Mate 21.2 Partitions, BIOS settings

´EFI´ - in opposite to UEFI - IS ´legacy BIOS´.
(Through that both settings - if available (UEFI) at all - needs to be done in the BIOS, there is no non-BIOS UEFI, despite of in the representations - what ever for with which intentions - it is said so, that UEFI would not (no more) be (called) BIOS, more specifically "there is no more ´such a thing´ as the BIOS" ...)
In older BIOSs - which is just EFI, but without extra labeled, because of there is not to switch to anything else there - so, there is no UEFI.
First in newer BIOSs it is possible to switch between EFI or UEFI.
(But both are (the) BIOS still. Correct ? Sorry, saying it twice.)
It is very easy to confuse these terms... due in large part to the fact that computer manufacturers often still refer to UEFI as BIOS themselves. It's not. UEFI replaced BIOS, but it included "legacy" support for older operating systems. And I do it too... I will refer you to "BIOS Settings" because it is best known by that term, even though it should more correctly be called, "UEFI Settings."

In the early period of transition from BIOS to UEFI, it was first called EFI... but then it became UEFI. So EFI is NOT "legacy BIOS" as you suggest. For all practical purposes, EFI and UEFI are the same thing. This new system replaced the legacy system known as BIOS. See UEFI History on Wikipedia for details.
 
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So: ´HD with installed Linux EASY to change (with which Linux version) to other mainboard´, is currently the best shortest, I think.
It is EASY to erase a hard drive and install Linux by itself. It is EASY to do it again and again to try new Linux versions. Installing to a hard drive will give you the BEST results, with the LEAST difficulty.

I suggest that you always have at least one good live Linux USB that you can trust to fall back on to re-install, if needed. You should always prepare for disaster... and especially keep good current backups of important data.
 
They are strictly UEFI only
Wouh, I did already fear this.
Not EFI possible anymore there ? Not the MBR partitions ? Only GPT partitions ?
But FAT32 still possible ? Sorry, just for clearness ? (Do not know - remind - this just right now.)

I do have some older motherboards that support both.
And before is only EFI, without mentioned at all in BIOS, because there is not to switch to UEFI possible.

No, they really are different things, which require different boot partitions.
As BIOS both - all three - are BIOS: this is equal.
Whether there is EFI only, EFI and UEFI (to select), UEFI only.

No, they really are different things, which require different boot partitions.
From selecting EFI or UEFI this creates - depending on which one - this different boot-requirements. (Just to mention it more precise, please.)
 
In the early period of transition from BIOS to UEFI, it was first called EFI... but then it became UEFI.

Not EFI possible anymore there ? Not the MBR partitions ? Only GPT partitions ?
To add to confusion there is also EFI partition (which the OP seem to be confusing) but this is not EFI "BIOS" :)
 
It is EASY to erase a hard drive and install Linux by itself. It is EASY to do it again and again to try new Linux versions. Installing to a hard drive will give you the BEST results, with the LEAST difficulty.

I suggest that you always have at least one good live Linux USB that you can trust to fall back on to re-install, if needed. You should always prepare for disaster... and especially keep good current backups of important data.
I do not who knows it from XP, or from an other Win-version, with the ´...7b´ Blue-Screen´ error at boot, which is not a problem from the there needed chipset drivers, as mostly presented so.
It is from a setting in BIOS, whether setted to SATA or IDE or both or - something as - compatible this.
Then this ´...7b´ stays away, XP boots and does install the there needed drivers, without having to use the install-CD at all.

Exactly this I am looking for/from a Linux-version.

(My datas go basically to an archiv-drive, even system-iso files.)
 
To add to confusion there is also EFI partition (which the OP seem to be confusing) but this is not EFI "BIOS" :)
No. But thanks.
But I do not need to know all backgrounds of EFI, UEFI, and BIOS already only called before, as I just could read in Wikipedia.
This is very much only confusing and not helping have it easy understandable.
 
and you might!
My trouble to create a new thread to this question is, I only have the XP example to explain, what I mean.
This is not possible to put in into an easy short title.
Currently it appears to me as if I have to install different Linux-versions, put it to an other PC (mainboard) or an other LapTop, check the BIOS-settings to set them equal and see what happens ...
 
If you move your hard drive from one computer to another, you may need to re-create your initramfs because the initramfs contains some information that is specific to the hardware configuration of the original computer, such as the device names, UUIDs, drivers, and modules. If the hardware configuration of the new computer is different, the initramfs may not be able to find or mount the real root filesystem, or load the necessary drivers or modules, resulting in boot failure or errors. Therefore, it is recommended to re-create the initramfs after moving the hard drive to a new computer, using commands like update-initramfs or dracut. You can do this from a live CD or USB, or from a rescue mode, by chrooting into the root filesystem of the hard drive and running the commands.
This sounds of as doable, if known how to handle this.
I do not see this for me.
The following idea I could imagine for me, where the focus stays to keep the (some personly) settings, (the) from external installed programs, and - as further example - the saved favourites in browsers,
after changing - connecting - to (the) other hardware, which is NOT just bootable I subordinate:
so I take the install Linux - CD/DVD/USB-stick - and do an ´over reinstall´ it. But which just ´overwrites´ - installs - the drivers of the now - new - hardware, but without deleting all the settings, installed programs, favourites of browsers.
(Perhaps NOW best worded, I wish to hope.
Despite of this is more effort as I know this what is with XP there is possible, when the BIOS-settings are equal (´OR´ correctly), this way for me still would be practicable.)
 
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Exactly this I am looking for/from a Linux-version.
I hope you find what you're looking for... and you might! Good luck! :)
The only EASY way currently to me is the following:
a live Linux-version - as the CD/DVD version or as on stick (usuallly to FAT32) - to on HD.
This so on hard-drive - not to forget: on FAT32 (where so; as on stick) - this drive is to use as a stick or the CD/DVD, to any hardware also. (But as live, but if wanted also to install, if needed. *)
(In Knoppix called ´Flash install´.)

* And now, in addition: to be able to make some settings and include some software - as for example a browser, or what else - into THIS live version directly there.
Whether these settings - for example screen-solution, and so - still do work at/with other hardware exact as well is to see.
But worth ´a´ try.
(Perhaps this exists as thread already with here ...)
 
Could find (quote) "For the bootloader, the easiest way is to pop the disk into the new machine, boot your distribution's live CD/USB and use its bootloader reparation tool", which perhaps also is able to do something as a repair installation, just an idea.
(https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/2865/moving-linux-install-to-a-new-computer)
Does have anyone experience(s) ?
(´Curious: do ´all´ Linux versions have this repair installation feature ?´)
Thank You.
 

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