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[Solved] Can't boot live by bootable usb stick

HR Habibur Rahman

New Member
Hello all.. I'm new in linux mint. I have downliaded the new released mint 19.1. And made a bootable usb stick by rufuse. but it's stucked on mint logo. can't get through it. i've waited so long but still the same.

i've cleaned my HDD using diskpart commant on cmd. and then made it primary. but though the live session isn't starting


it always stacks in mint logo. even 1 hour.



what should i do?


Configurations

Asrock h61m-vs3 with intel i3
ram 2gb
HD graphics
please help me


once i tried mint 18. Then it worked fine in live mode. but it's not.
please help. Thanks
 

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Condobloke

Well-Known Member
G'day HR, and Welcome to linux.org

It looks to me like it has booted....but the taskbar/panel has not appeared.

I am not sure why that has happened.

I am assuming you have downloaded Linux mint with the Cinnamone DE (desktop environment).../?

Try downloading 19.1 again with either the MATE or XFCE DE

let us know if you experience joy

(MATE is very much like windows 7.....Xfce is very fast)
 

HR Habibur Rahman

New Member
G'day HR, and Welcome to linux.org

It looks to me like it has booted....but the taskbar/panel has not appeared.

I am not sure why that has happened.

I am assuming you have downloaded Linux mint with the Cinnamone DE (desktop environment).../?

Try downloading 19.1 again with either the MATE or XFCE DE

let us know if you experience joy

(MATE is very much like windows 7.....Xfce is very fast)
Thanks sir..
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
My pleasure.
 

TechnoJunky

Active Member
I think I might know what your issue is. It's the same issue I have. It has something to do with the video driver and the kernel. If your interested in more details just do a search on nomodeset. But what I'd like you to try is during the bootup you get a menu. I don't recall the exact options, but one that you probably selected is Try Mint or something like that. When that menu item appears, instead of hitting enter, hit the letter E on your keyboard. This will allow you to edit the command line that starts Mint. The next screen it shows you the command line. Look for the words quiet splash and add nomodeset right after it. On my distro it was quiet splash --- something. So I changed it to quiet splash nomodeset --- something. Give it a try and let us know if it worked. BTW, booting up to the Installer USB is the only time I have to do this. After I install to the harddrive (or another USB stick) I no longer have to make this setting change.
 
Last edited:

Jarret B

Active Member
When the second picture appears you can press the Escape key. You should now see a listing of the 'behind the scenes' and you can see any error messages. You should also see what is going on when it all hangs. This can help give you a clue. I have had two system lately that needed a BIOS update when installing a newer version of Ubuntu. I got an AHCI error message and after updating the BIOS everything went smoothly.
Instead of Rufus you could try Etcher. Hope this helps.
 

cuvtixo

New Member
Also, I don't know if it will happen to you but for me, I have an Nvidia video card and if I leave the default video driver installed, everytime I log out or reboot the computer freezes. So if that happens to you to, change the driver to the Nvidia one instead of the default Nouveau.
On one hand..., yes this is a serious problem that happened to me on several Ubuntu-derived distros. Pop!OS deliberately addresses this issue. On the Other, the Asrock motherboard has Intel HD Graphics. This is an unfortunately generic name "HD Graphics", but it is Intel, not Nvidia. (Unless the poster has an unmentioned added video card) I try different new Linux distros, usually on underpowered laptops, as my hobby. IMO MXLinux has the best USB distro (its newish and derives much from AntiX.) Persistence (keeping settings and data) can be an issue with many USB distros. Most USB's are meant for temporary use and offline installation. I've also had many more problems since most linux distros moved to SystemD. These can require quite a bit of time diagnosing, so I don't have solutions, just making that observation.
 

cuvtixo

New Member
When the second picture appears you can press the Escape key. You should now see a listing of the 'behind the scenes' and you can see any error messages. You should also see what is going on when it all hangs. This can help give you a clue. I have had two system lately that needed a BIOS update when installing a newer version of Ubuntu. I got an AHCI error message and after updating the BIOS everything went smoothly.
Instead of Rufus you could try Etcher. Hope this helps.
Very good ideas. Usually I press the right arrow key instead of Esc, I forget if this works in Mint. I've had better luck with Rufus than Etcher, although it may have improved since Balena took ownership of Etcher, and Rufus won't work from Mac or Linux. I've also had luck with Unetbootin, which does more "hand-holding" for creation of new boot disks.
 

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