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Should I change Gentoo as my main distro to Debian?

TheSkySoloPlus

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Sup Linux forums, So, I love Gentoo, I have installed it on servers and It's incredibly fast, The problem is that Gentoo is far from perfect, Starting with GPU support, I have an RTX 2060 along with a Ryzen 5 3600x which is pretty overkill, A lot of my friends tell me to use Windows instead of Linux but f%ck Windows, I consider myself an advanced Linux user (I've been using Linux for almost 15 years, But, As a daily driver I've been using it since December last year)
Some of the things I like about Gentoo:
- You have to compile everything
- You don't need to use systemd
- Customization at its peak
What I dislike about Gentoo:
- It has a lot of glitches because I use an Nvidia card (I lost over 10 hours of work once because of this and I just can't afford an AMD card rn, I'm going through a divorce)
- Some of these glitches include but are not limited to:
- Kernel panics
- System crashes
- Applications crashing
- Portage being a little b&tch
- Instability in general
- I'm stuck with the binary kernel

As for Debian, Welp, I've never used Debian! That might be a shock considering how long I've been using Linux but, No, I've never used Debian, Only its derivatives.

At first glance, Here's what I
Like about Debian:
- It's stable
- It's secure
- It's amazingly fast
- It has support for .deb files (duh) which will make my life wayyy easier so I don't spend 2 hours writing an ebuild for an app I will use for about 10 minutes
What I dislike about Debian:
- It's stuck with systemd (I know there's Devuan but for some reason I don't trust it)
- Most packages (Like Gnome, KDE, XFCE) come with a "Debian Theme" Meaning it's not "Factory default" which is kinda meh
 


SlowCoder

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... or maybe a Debian derivative, if you desire.
I've been using Debian and it's derivatives (Mint and LMDE most recently), for many years, and rarely have problems. I've also used Fedora off and on, with good results.

To each their own, but the disdain for Systemd is silly to me, and is a non-issue. So is my need to compile everything; I'm over that; too much management.

Choose something and run with it.
 

wizardfromoz

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... or maybe a Debian derivative, if you desire.

The OP has said

No, I've never used Debian, Only its derivatives.

I don't know if that shuts the door to derivatives.

If not, it is hard to go past MX-Linux. It ships with sysVinit as default, but offers the option to run with Systemd (installed only, not on the Live).

I've used LMDE since Betsy, and it is good still, too (current edition codenamed Elsie).

If you want to stick with Gentoo but -based, I quite like Calculate.

Welcome to linux.org :)

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

f33dm3bits

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What I dislike about Debian:
- It's stuck with systemd (I know there's Devuan but for some reason I don't trust it)
Looking at your list it seems you have a long list of dislikes for Gentoo. There are plenty of other Debian based distributions which use other init systems that aren't systemd.
Although you may want to add to your dislikes of Debian that the software is old compared to most other distributions because with desktop systems it usually nice to have a bit newer software than what Debian ships with.
 
OP
T

TheSkySoloPlus

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Thanks everyone for the suggestions, I've been thinking about either using (dramatic pause) ARCH! (or) Debian himself

I'm a programmer, More specifically a C++ programmer, But in recent years due to the rise of Rust I've been wanting to learn it a lot, And Gentoo's Rust package is so poorly administered that trying to compile a Rust program is like trying to learn how to ride a bicycle while carrying 2 elephants in the back (pretty hard) I've used Arch before (for a long, LONG time) before changing to Gentoo, Arch is AMAZING! Don't get me wrong, I love Arch, It has debtap, YAY (Yet Another Yogurt which, I prefer, so I don't have to add 2910 overlays) But when I used it, It had some glitches, Like, I really NEED to use DaVinci Resolve, Which for some reason Arch couldn't run, So, What should I run?
Arch or Debian? (For a daily desktop system and for coding)
 

Terminal Velocity

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I use Debian 11 since its release about a year ago, it never crashed, never froze as other distributions. I do casual daily use and I also run demanding programs.
I don't know about rust compilers, lazarus ide runs fine

Here are the non-free torrents you gonna need

EDIT
Is Arch Linux a stable distribution? Will I get frequent breakage?

It is the user who is ultimately responsible for the stability of their own rolling release system. The user decides when to upgrade, and merges necessary changes when required. If the user reaches out to the community, help is often provided in a timely manner. The difference between Arch and other distributions in this regard is that Arch is truly a 'do-it-yourself' distribution; complaints of breakage are misguided and unproductive, since upstream changes are not the responsibility of Arch devs.



This is from here:

 
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f33dm3bits

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So, What should I run?
Arch or Debian? (For a daily desktop system and for coding)
Go for Arch then because that way you have access to the latest and greatest packages, from my experience developers like working with the newer versions of packages. However instead of Arch just use EndeavourOS, it has a nice installer and for the rest it's just Arch, go for btrfs been running as a filesystem.
 

KGIII

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I've also had some success with Manjaro - including stability... I admit my bias, but Lubuntu is awesome - I'm on the team that brings you said distro and an official 'Ubuntu Member'. So, I'm pretty biased in that department.

This is one of those questions you kinda gotta answer for yourself. I wrote something that sorta applies here, and it may be worth giving it a quick read:


That's more aimed at a newbie, but much of it would apply to how I'd answer were I to type out a long response.
 

kc1di

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If it were me I'd go with MX-21 Stable fairly new packages many tools and options. Give it a try.
 

Fanboi

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About this...
As for Debian, Welp, I've never used Debian! That might be a shock considering how long I've been using Linux but, No, I've never used Debian, Only its derivatives.

At first glance, Here's what I
Like about Debian:
- It's stable
- It's secure
- It's amazingly fast
- It has support for .deb files (duh) which will make my life wayyy easier so I don't spend 2 hours writing an ebuild for an app I will use for about 10 minutes
What I dislike about Debian:
- It's stuck with systemd (I know there's Devuan but for some reason I don't trust it)
- Most packages (Like Gnome, KDE, XFCE) come with a "Debian Theme" Meaning it's not "Factory default" which is kinda meh
M'kaaaay..... Here's some Debian facts song:

Falsehoods spread by many a plebian,
Surrounding my old and faithful Debian,
Oh I can tell ye plentiful tails
Of this OS which ne'er fails
But first, to debunk a myth or two,
And root out the falsehoods given to you


It's stable -- Circumstantially True. The "stable" and "oldstable" branches are stable. The others have no guarantee. However, they usually still are. Even running Sid/Unstable gives minimal issues and there's usually a reasonable lead time on patches (or just compile yourself from upstream since you're used to using Gentoo). That said, "stable" is a sort of mindset, though. Some people consider only one crash per month stable, others would barely forgive one per year. Some people think it's just about the OS, some include packages, some even include the interaction between packages as a metric. And the fact that there's occasional breakages and dependency mess-ups outside "stable" means we cannot blanket Debian.

It's secure -- False. False in the sense that most distros are as secure as you make them. Some are not well-secured by default as they are not meant for beginners or aren't designed for Desktop OSes. Others are excessively robustly secure by default. Debian isn't either. Debian is as secure by default as any general-purpose distro. Now, they do get security patches fast. That's because they have a security team specially for this. But just gtting good, timely security updates is not actually the most important criteria for "secure" (probably ranks 3rd).

It's amazingly fast -- False. Install it with the default Debian-flavoured Gnome3 and call that fast... Well, the definition of "fast" is relative... but so is how fast Debian is. Install the base only and then openbox + sxhkd and rofi and you'll have a monster, but it'll also look like an early 2000s OS (not a bad thing). There are some lighting distros like MX, and even faster, Antix, which are all Debian family. But LMDE and Ubuntu are also Debian-based. See, a lot of the "speed" depends on the software installed and the DE.

It has support for .deb files (duh) which will make my life wayyy easier so I don't spend 2 hours writing an ebuild for an app I will use for about 10 minutes -- True. But "One does not simply" install .debs like they were Windows .msis or .exes. Debian has a massive package repo and a competant package manager that is simple and straightforward. Use these tools.

It's stuck with systemd (I know there's Devuan but for some reason I don't trust it) -- Grey Area. Debian GNU/Linux has changed to systemd by default, but Devuan is not the only alternative. I mentioned Antix and MX earlier (MX being Antix family). Now installing a core Antix and building it up will give you what you want. Alternatively, do a full install and de-clutter it. You will be running a nearly pure Debian (minor tweaks). I used Antix for years on an old laptop (installed, not persistent live) and it's a very good option. Honestly, the difference between the two when just using them for everyday work/entertainment is negligible if you know your way around some of the more classic CLI tools Antix ships default (which you can change most of if you dislike them -- albeit a 10min learning curve if you just stick with the tools provided). While these are all technically derivs, arguably including Devuan, it's hardly the same relationship. Debian:Antix is very close, whereas Debian:LMDE is further away, and Debian:Ubuntu is even further (despite the irony of Mint's parentage -- some distro incest there).

Most packages (Like Gnome, KDE, XFCE) come with a "Debian Theme" Meaning it's not "Factory default" which is kinda meh False. The default "desktop environment"-s are metapackages (as is "Debian Desktop Environment", AKA Gnome3). Just install the base system only and then manually install the DEs stand alone (or by component if you're that OTT) -- here's XFCE4 unveiled. Ignore recommends, take suggests. However, the "theme" argument is invalid since nobody, well, maybe 0.1% of people, uses a DE vanilla from upstream. So, you are going to download icons, GTK themes, WM themes, cursors, wallpapers, etc. and customise your DE anyway. What difference does it make what it looked like before?

So, you made it this far. Good. Okay, now as to deciding on a distro, you clearly want stability and are capable of putting in the work but not too willing. That is, you're sick of the schlep. Don't blame you. I used to build my distros up from their ost core/base option, but nowadays, I partition my disks manually and then just hit Enter, Enter, Enter. I can always remove what I don't like. It'd faster and easier. As someone who has been surviving Gentoo (surviving, yes) for 15 years, aside from suggesting you get a platinum medal, I would say go for Debian. That's not my bias talking. Sure, Arch has the AUR, but you've been using Gentoo for 15 years. Compiling the odd package yourself isn't going to be a major PITA for you, it'll be a minor annoyance. You'll also come to realise that tons of stuff in AUR is also available on Appimage, which is a much easier beastie to manage. But I'm confident you'll find Debian's official repo more/less enough.

Just my two cents.
 

super_user_do

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"You have to compile everything"
What a monster PC you have to compile in less than 92222489999999 hours?

If you daily drive Gentoo you're probably an advanced user. I don't feel like advising any Debian-based distro or Debian itself. If you want to switch to a good, bleeding edge and stable distro, try Fedora

DOWNLOAD FEDORA HERE <---------
ENABLE RPM FUSION <---------
ENABLE AMF (For AMD Cards) <---------
 
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