• We had to restore from a backup today after a failed software update. Backup was from 0000 EDT and restored it at 0800 EDT so we lost about 8hrs. Today is 07/20/2024. More info here.

Running Windows Software on a VM using WINE

If you want to run MS Office only check WINE site.

There are two types of VM hypervisors: type I which lets you to run VM on bare metal meaning that OS has access to all hardware directly and this access is controlled by hypervisor. Hypervisor decides if OS in VM has access to BIOS, EFI, video, network disk and so on. OS in VM is completely isolated. The best hypervisor type I is Qubes.
On your hardware you have to install Qubes first and then using templates you can install other OSes or Linux distros.

Hypervisor type II is most popular and OS in VM is accessing pre-defined "hardware" which is also the limitation of hypervisor type II.

Most flexible and at the same time most secure is hypervisor type I. It is also most difficult to handle. Qubes has specific hardware requirements to make it truly secure environment.
 


There are two types of VM hypervisors: type I which lets you to run VM on bare metal meaning that OS has access to all hardware directly and this access is controlled by hypervisor. Hypervisor decides if OS in VM has access to BIOS, EFI, video, network disk and so on. OS in VM is completely isolated. The best hypervisor type I is Qubes. On your hardware you have to install Qubes first and then using templates you can install other OSes or Linux distros.
I see where you are coming from but I don't think OP is the audience to be talking to about hypervisors, they just took their first steps into Linux sometime ago. So talking about different hypervisors isn't going to do OP much good, Virtualbox is the most I would recommend when doing anything with virtual machines because anything else beyond that will be too complicated for OP as they are still a beginner in Linux and using Linux Mint so I would recommend that they stay with Linux Mint for the same reason.
 
I see where you are coming from but I don't think OP is the audience to be talking to about hypervisors, they just took their first steps into Linux sometime ago. So talking about different hypervisors isn't going to do OP much good, Virtualbox is the most I would recommend when doing anything with virtual machines because anything else beyond that will be too complicated for OP as they are still a beginner in Linux and using Linux Mint so I would recommend that they stay with Linux Mint for the same reason.
Maybe I was wrong, but I thought that OP is a little bit confused about WINE and VM so I wanted to straighten out things :)
 
I agree with the overall recommendation that if you're going to use a Virtual Machine, just install Windows on it. It will simplify the set up by a great deal and you will get about the same privacy after all.

Installing Linux on the VM to use WINE in it will work, but it will break every so often and will require manual fixing and a lot of configuration editing. Not worth in my opinion as there will be heaps of work for a negligible difference in terms of privacy.
 
I've only been using Linux Mint for 1.5 years so I don't feel confident enough to make a recomendation one way or the other.
I can however offer this. I have tried to install Wine, and had to wipe the drive and re install Mint as it trashed my OS. I have also installed Virtualbox 7 and installed Win 10 on it with no problem at all. You can download a legal free copy of Win 10 to create a Win 10 VM. It can't be personalized but, as far as I can tell, it's fully functional otherwise.
 
I've only been using Linux Mint for 1.5 years so I don't feel confident enough to make a recomendation one way or the other.
I can however offer this. I have tried to install Wine, and had to wipe the drive and re install Mint as it trashed my OS.
@Danbor :-

This is one of the primary reasons I developed the whole range of 'portable' apps for Puppy Linux. In overview, they work exactly like their Windoze counterparts; the applications, along with all configuration files, are contained within a single directory. I've built them in such a way that the user has the option to just run it entirely AS a 'portable' by clicking on its own launcher, OR - if required - a Menuentry can be linked into/unlinked from the system.....just to make access that bit simpler.

Many are based around AppImages, but AppImages, although the apps themselves are 'portable', have this horrid habit of leaving orphan config files around when you've finished with them. You also have to set things up over & over again, every time you move to another OS. To me, this made no sense; you might as well set things up just the once.....then take not only the app, but also the settings with you when you move.

Over time, you end up wasting quite a bit of disk space. Especially if you run half-a-dozen distros, and want to run the same apps in each one. You end up with massive 'over-duplication'.....

You CAN only run one distro at a time. So it stands to reason you can only run one instance of any given app, too. The other copies of the same app are just sitting there on your drive, fat, dumb & happy......not doing anything, and occupying/wasting a lot of drive space in the process.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~​

Since WINE can be run in AppImage format, too, this facilitated a 'portable' version of WINE.....which you only link into your system, temporarily, as & when you actually use it. This alleviates the possibility of it wrecking your OS....

Well, it all makes sense to ME. How about you...?


Mike. ;)
 
Last edited:
@Danbor :-

This is one of the primary reasons I developed the whole range of 'portable' apps for Puppy Linux. In overview, they work exactly like their Windoze counterparts; the applications, along with all configuration files, are contained within a single directory. I've built then in such a way that the user has the option to just run it entirely AS a 'portable' by clicking on its own launcher, OR - if required - a Menuentry can be linked into/unlinked from the system.....just to make access that bit simpler.

Many are based around AppImages, but AppImages, although the apps themselves are 'portable', have this horrid habit of leaving orphan config files around when you've finished with them. You also have to set things up over & over again, every time you move to another OS. To me, this made no sense; you might as well set things up just the once.....then take not only the app, but also the settings with you when you move.

Over time, you end up wasting quite a bit of disk space. Especially if you run half-a-dozen distros, and want to run the same apps in each one. You end up with massive 'over-duplication'.....

You CAN only run one distro at a time. So it stands to reason you can only run one instance of any given app, too. The other copies of the same app are just sitting there on your drive, fat, dumb & happy......not doing anything, and occupying/wasting a lot of drive space in the process.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~​

Since WINE can be run in AppImage format, too, this facilitated a 'portable' version of WINE.....which you only link into your system, temporarily, as & when you actually use it. This alleviates the possibility of it wrecking your OS....

Well, it all makes sense to ME. How about you...?


Mike. ;)
It does make sense Mike. Kudo's for the work.
If I were of a bent to employ multiple OS's that sounds like the way to go.
I'm quite content with Mint Cinnamon currently. I have the virtual win 10 installed, but honestly can't remember the last time I started it for anything more than updating it.
 
UPDATE:

I did not get the job. Because I have a more pressing issue, I'm going to table this one.

Thank you everyone for all of your help!
 
I did not get the job. Because I have a more pressing issue, I'm going to table this one.
Sorry you didn't get the job! I hope you get whatever the more pressing issue is sorted!
 

Members online


Top