...run fsck automatic or manually ... does no good

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anneranch

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My best guess is hardware failure - limited to first disk partition...
suggested remedy to run fsck manually keeps repeating , hence no fix
I have copied the misbehaving partition, run "update grub" and BOTH of them works as expected.
My best guess - my 3TB HDD is flaky
 


guiverc

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If I have any power failure, disk issue etc... I firstly stop using the system, boot *live* media (once event is over, eg. power is restored & has been good awhile) & then check the health of my drive(s).

SMART (Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology) exists for that purpose; it's built into drives by manufacturers so you just need a tool that will read the data from the drive electronics (it doesn't use the drive itself; only electronics; so if it's a dying device you can assess the health before you plan any data recovery & not waste any remaining life doing assessments).

For Ubuntu, the SMART wiki page is found here - https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Smartmontools

You can use GUI tools to view the data too (you don't have to use `smartctl` from command line if you don't want to), but I'd explore the health of the drive; using the drive's own status & diagnostic tools, ie. drive's SMART capacity.

If the drive is dying; fixing issues will be just a waste of time as it'll be a constant & losing battle.
 
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anneranch

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If I have any power failure, disk issue etc... I firstly stop using the system, boot *live* media (once event is over, eg. power is restored & has been good awhile) & then check the health of my drive(s).

SMART (Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology) exists for that purpose; it's built into drives by manufacturers so you just need a tool that will read the data from the drive electronics (it doesn't use the drive itself; only electronics; so if it's a dying device you can assess the health before you plan any data recovery & not waste any remaining life doing assessments).

For Ubuntu, the SMART wiki page is found here - https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Smartmontools

You can use GUI tools to view the data too (you don't have to use `smartctl` from command line if you don't want to), but I'd explore the health of the drive; using the drive's own status & diagnostic tools, ie. drive's SMART capacity.

If the drive is dying; fixing issues will be just a waste of time as it'll be a constant & losing battle.
I have used USB mounted ISO many times - it does not solve the problem - if it is for real failing hardware - it just installs new OS copy...

Electronics fails - but about 1 year old 3TB drive ???

Last usage of 21.10 ISO was a total disaster UNTIL I removed all but one disk. The "install OS alongside existing OS's " just picked any disk but the failing one.
I know I did set SMART for SATA drives - in UEFI setup - not checked , will do , to see how to set it on USB drives - which is faling.

Funny part - SMART keep nagging me of impending failure of much older SATA disk which keeps running just fine - as RAID spare.
 

guiverc

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You don't boot the ISO to install an OS; you use the "Try Ubuntu" option. You're using the *live* system so the disk you're reading the health (SMART) data from is sitting idle & isn't trying to run. You don't need it to be used to read SMART/health data from it; you only need it powered as the circuit board on the drive provides the answer from it's firmware/chips. With it not running, not being used & trying to get over issues, you get the results quickly (and most importantly don't risk any damage done if the results are of a failing drive)

SMART is a disk drive technology; the technology works for all drives be they SCSI, ATA, SAS etc. and almost all external USB drives contain SMART too (*some real early external drives used non-SMART disk drives but not in branded products*).

SMART scans on boot aren't reliable (*they are fast and can produce marginal results if a drive has some contradictory SMART results*), which is why I'm suggesting reading the full results from your drive.
 
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