Problems afters some file system modification

Ranuglietto

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Hello to everyone.
I've just installed for the first time ubuntu 20.04 lts. I don't have a previous experience with the os except some really basic things. After the installation I followed step by step this video https: //youtu.be/MNX7HgcWqHc up the point 7 included. So my modification where the changes to swappiness value and to the number of SSD writings. Unfortunately I haven't reboot my of after the single change, but only after the 7th point.

Once I rebooted my system, Ubuntu didn't boot correctly anymore. It gave me the following error log on the screen :

- failed to start remount root and kernel filesystem
- failed to activate swap /swapfile
- dependency failed for swap
- b43-phy0 E RROR

Then, the system freezes on a black screen reporting only 'ubuntu' with the logo on the low part of the screen.

I tried to solve this issue, trying to remodify the file system mentioned in the 4 and 6 point of the video. But every attempt to modify these ones failed because the system was always in Read-only mode.
I tried also with a pen drive with ubuntu on but I failed again.
What can I do now?
Sorry if my English is bad but I am Italian. hanks to everyone
 


KGIII

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Given the amount of time you're going to invest, I'd suggest just starting over and not following that guide.

When people say, "These are the things you should do after you install Ubuntu!" What they're really saying is, "These are the things I do after I install Ubuntu."

Install a nice clean install - and then just use it. Use it until you find an itch you need to scratch, otherwise just let it work like it did when you first installed it.

In time, you'll learn to tweak the OS to your needs. But, as you're just starting out, don't go screwing with it. Screwing with it is how you break things. Right now, you're new to Linux and you're still thinking like a Windows user (most likely). The differences between the underlying OS are huge - even if they both have a GUI that you use and looks like they provide similar functions.

So, just install and keep it fairly stock for a while before you go 'tweaking' and changing things. If you feel like you must tweak and change things, pick a different distro, one you can live with stock longer.

Otherwise, you're gonna keep breaking things - which is a lovely way to learn Linux but it's really frustrating. If you insist on learning that way, you're gonna want to take some steps backwards and first learn how to properly backup your data so that you can restore it easily.
 

Condobloke

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One of our Well Known Members here, @Alexzee, has excellent advice in his signature:......If it isn't broke don't fix it. If you can't fix it don't break it. You reap what you tweak.
 

Fanboi

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When people say, "These are the things you should do after you install Ubuntu!" What they're really saying is, "These are the things I do after I install Ubuntu."
You won the internet!
I seriously hate those "10 things to do after installing <distro>" videos and "pro" tips. Most of 'em have the same tips in a different order. Thank God I was messing with TinyCore and AntiX mainly when I started.
 

Ranuglietto

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Given the amount of time you're going to invest, I'd suggest just starting over and not following that guide.

When people say, "These are the things you should do after you install Ubuntu!" What they're really saying is, "These are the things I do after I install Ubuntu."

Install a nice clean install - and then just use it. Use it until you find an itch you need to scratch, otherwise just let it work like it did when you first installed it.

In time, you'll learn to tweak the OS to your needs. But, as you're just starting out, don't go screwing with it. Screwing with it is how you break things. Right now, you're new to Linux and you're still thinking like a Windows user (most likely). The differences between the underlying OS are huge - even if they both have a GUI that you use and looks like they provide similar functions.

So, just install and keep it fairly stock for a while before you go 'tweaking' and changing things. If you feel like you must tweak and change things, pick a different distro, one you can live with stock longer.

Otherwise, you're gonna keep breaking things - which is a lovely way to learn Linux but it's really frustrating. If you insist on learning that way, you're gonna want to take some steps backwards and first learn how to properly backup your data so that you can restore it easily.
I get your point. I think I will have to learn more. But for now I don't know what to do. If you have any suggestions given my problems, please help me.
 

KGIII

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I gave you a few suggestions. Reinstall and don't screw with it until you're truly comfortable. When you do start screwing with it, make sure you've learned how to both backup and test your backups. It's *generally* safe to install applications from the default repositories.

It's okay to take it slow. There's a learning curve. You can obviously run it fine in the default configuration or they'd have not released it in that configuration. You don't *need* to do these ten things when you install Ubuntu. If those things needed to be done, Ubuntu would have already done them before they released it.
 

Ranuglietto

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Thank you for the advice. My problem is that I cannot boot anything now. Neither from a pen drive neither from the boot menu. My system blocks in the black screen.
 

KGIII

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That's likely just timing issues. The BIOS boot function is first in the boot process and Linux has no power to alter that. Your USB will have to be bootable, of course. The link below may help:

 

Condobloke

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I've just installed for the first time ubuntu 20.04 lts
How did you go about Installing Ubuntu initially?

Do exactly the same thing again.

Do you still have Ubuntu on a thumb drive?

If yes....plug the thumb drive in and then reboot. Then follow the instructions in the video above (https://linux-tips.us/how-do-i-boot-to-usb-or-cd-dvd-if-such-is-available/)

When you have the usb stick booted, install Ubuntu exactly as you did before.

Are you using a translator to read these post etc?

Google Translate

DeepL translate
 

Fanboi

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Thank you for the advice. My problem is that I cannot boot anything now. Neither from a pen drive neither from the boot menu. My system blocks in the black screen.
If you mean it won't boot the bootloader (GRUB/etc.) You probably altered the boot priority to a bootable, but broken device.

- Poweroff (cold)
- Insert USB flasdrive with Live OS image.
- Power on
- Enter BIOS
- Set USB flashdrive as primary boot device.
- Save & reboot
 
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