Path After Linux Mint

NooGauie

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Hello all,

I'm new to the Linux community! I'm a beginner getting my feet wet dabbling in Linux Mint 20. However, I want a strong foundation in Linux to then branch into other areas, but not sure which path(s) to take that would be well-suited for me. Any suggestions are most welcomed and thank you very much for you guidance!
 


khedger

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Need more specific info to be of any help. I'm not sure what "I want a strong foundation in Linux to then branch into other areas" means. Do you want to do program development, DevOps, System Administration, all of the above? What is it exactly that you're trying to achieve?

keith
 

NooGauie

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Hi Keith. I'm not sure which path to take. I'm tech savvy so I think I'd be pretty good in some areas, but is there some kind of assessment one can take?

I do love Kali Linux, but it's too advance for me right now.
 

khedger

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Hmmm.....I'm still a bit confused about what it is you are trying to do. Kali linux is just another linux distro optimized for network 'hacking'. So, from a linux standpoint it's no more advanced than Mint or any other distro. Learning to use the networking tools that it's optimized for and the underlying network based protocols and such could be more advanced. The thing to understand is that there's nothing you can do with Kali linux that you can't do with Mint, though you would have to install some additional tools to the basic Mint distro that Kali already comes bundled with.But again, the question is, what would you want to use these tools and protocols to DO? If you want to be a linux networking expert then, yes you can install Kali, or you can add some packages to Mint, but what you really will need to do is to start learning TCP/IP internals, how to program for networks, etc etc etc See where I'm coming from? Your path will be deterimined by your goal.

keith
 

NooGauie

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I guess the short answer is I'm not entirely sure. I do know learning Linux is a good start, but where to take that goal afterwards is still a question mark for me. That's why I mentioned about an assessment to take that will help narrow that path. What about Linux certification? Which Linux cert is considered a must-have for any beginner Linux user? Also, would you happen to know of a good Linux Command Lines sheet to use? I found some online, but there all different. Your feedback is greatly appreciated!
 

khedger

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Are you a previous Windows or Mac user? Consider how you would approach answering your own question if you were just starting to work with one of those OS'. The question is the same for any OS, not just Linux. If you wanted to achieve the same goal in Windows, what would you do?

keith
 

NooGauie

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Are you a previous Windows or Mac user? Consider how you would approach answering your own question if you were just starting to work with one of those OS'. The question is the same for any OS, not just Linux. If you wanted to achieve the same goal in Windows, what would you do?

keith
@khedger Yes, I was a Windows user. Thanks for your direction in helping out this newbie!
 

NooGauie

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If you *really* want to understand Linux, try something called Linux From Scratch... You will learn many things.


It's a book. It is not easy. You will learn a great deal. It is not easy, but it is very educational.
@KGIII I love how structured the instructions are and examples - easy to follow. There's a ton of info so I see what you mean.

I'm still a noob and all I keep thinking about is, knowing your Command Lines. Thanks for the book! P.S. Like your quote. Seen it "42" times. HAHA!
 
Last edited:

KGIII

Well-Known Member
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There's a ton of info so I see what you mean.
If you follow the instructions - follow them completely and precisely. Do not go to other sites and follow those instructions. Follow those instructions and only those instructions, at least until you get the hang of it and know why you're doing what you're doing. If you do not follow them precisely, and from their site, you will almost certainly fail and lose interest. It's a pain in the bottom, but worth the effort. Use a virtual machine and it makes it easier. You can not only wipe it and start over, you can use snapshots in case you mess up.

I also recommend Wiley's Linux Bible. I have the 8th and 10th edition. You could probably find a used copy of the 8th or 9th edition and it'd still be just as valid today. The current edition is not expensive. The last time I shared it on a site, someone chimed in that it was easily pirated. I don't necessarily condone that, but they were correct. I much prefer a physical book to a PDF.

I've been using Linux for a long time. I'd used Unix even before that. I still consider myself a beginner. I spent far too many years learning to use a distro or a desktop environment and not enough years actually learning about Linux. That's okay. I'm not really in a huge rush! I don't consider that time wasted - but it could probably have been spent in a more productive manner.
 

NooGauie

New Member
Credits
58
If you follow the instructions - follow them completely and precisely. Do not go to other sites and follow those instructions. Follow those instructions and only those instructions, at least until you get the hang of it and know why you're doing what you're doing. If you do not follow them precisely, and from their site, you will almost certainly fail and lose interest. It's a pain in the bottom, but worth the effort. Use a virtual machine and it makes it easier. You can not only wipe it and start over, you can use snapshots in case you mess up.

I also recommend Wiley's Linux Bible. I have the 8th and 10th edition. You could probably find a used copy of the 8th or 9th edition and it'd still be just as valid today.
I have Linux Mint on my USB. Is that okay as opposed to downloading it on a VM?
 


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