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Operating System Maintenance, What is necessary?

Sherri is a Cat

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I'm still a pretty new convert to Linux Mint 21.3 from Windows...

I've always been obsessive about keeping the system clean because all the left over junk slows things down and interferes with functionality. I ran CCleaner at least once a day.

Being new to Linux, I was wondering if this sort of thing is something I should keep doing.


For the record...

Things I already do.
  • When I close my browser, all cookies and browsing history is deleted. I use the standard settings for browser privacy.
  • I use Duck Duck Go as my search engine.
  • uBlock Origin
  • Despite all of these things, I routinely found around 500+ cookies on my PC plus other junk after a single browsing session.

What I learned
  • I read this It's Foss article Best CCleaner Like System Cleaning Utilities for Ubuntu Linux
  • Linux doesn't have registry errors.
  • But it does have cached files, site trackers, cookies, etc.
  • I can enter commands in the terminal or I can use an app.
    • Being a new user, I opted for an app
  • I opted for Bleach Bit
    • Downloaded from the repository
  • There are a lot of things I'm unsure of or don't understand
    • One being the option to
  • To be on the safe side, I ran auto-clean.
    • Anything called 'Auto' usually means there are a lot other things that don't get cleaned
There are a lot of other things that can be checked. This a lot of research and I'm pressed for time lately!

Looking for some input here!

Also, is defragging the hard drive necessary? If so, input on that is welcome too!

Thank you.
 


I just clear browser history and then clear out thumbnail cache.

clear out thumbnail cache

Code:
rm -v -f ~/.cache/thumbnails/*/*.png ~/.thumbnails/*/*.png

Code:
rm -v -f ~/.cache/thumbnails/*/*/*.png ~/.thumbnails/*/*/*.png

Then I

Code:
sudo apt clean

Code:
sudo apt autoclean

There are cleaners although before using them and applying the cleaning features make certain to understand each cleaning feature.
 
.... before using them and applying the cleaning features make certain to understand each cleaning feature.

Yup! That's exactly why I started this thread! For now I'll just use the terminal. That's actually easier.

Thanks!
 
Hi, @Sherri is a Cat

Cleaning cache and cookies every time you close your browser can indeed slow down your experience, because your browser will have to download everything every time, all the time. Cached files (images, static text,...) will actually improve the performance of your computer. I'd rather not do it unless you run short in disk space. I personally never run any "cleanup" software on any of my computers.

I'd also get ClamAV (anti-malware) and ClamTK (user interface for the first) to scan any package or document that supports active content (PDF, Word Documents) you download. The malware may not affect you while on Linux, but if you send or forward an infected document infected to someone on Windows or Mac, the consequences can be bad. You will find both of them in the distribution you use.

The trackers are a different thing, and you will find enormous difference. Those are not cached, but javascript code that gets loaded on your browser by the websites you use, and they use your memory, CPU, and network connection to make a few extra bucks for the Microsofts, the Googles, the Amazons and the Facebooks and the like.

uBlock origin is already making a big win for you.

The next step would be to block trackers before they reach your computer, by using a service like NextDNS or installing a pi-hole on your network. Obviously the first one is easier because someone else is doing the filtering for you, but there's a (low) yearly cost ($30) that you can avoid if you install a PiHole in a Raspberry Pi that you already have and go through the hassle of fincking on it. It's fun, though, but it takes a bit of time to get around it. I have moved my hose from having a PiHole to have configured NextDNS on my router and everything goes faster, not just the computers, but also the TV, media streaming boxes,... everything that has a processor and connects to the internet will benefit from it.
 
  • I opted for Bleach Bit
I use BleachBit as well just be careful as to what you check it could mean some serious issues when cleaning the wrong thing

As with uBlock I also use Privacy Badger since it blocks different stuff - Privacy Badger and uBlock Origin target different kinds of ads and tracking. Privacy badger is privacy focused, while uBlock Origin targets all kinds of ads, not just the ones most associated with privacy risks.
 
this browser https://librewolf.net/ doesnt store anything. You close it, you open it -> fresh browser. I've also never seen any ads using it.

Other than that, desktop linux OS maintenance - literally nothing imho. Just use it. I would even go as far as to say you can run distro version upgrades reasonably stable and don't need to re-install for the next higher stable release of your distro.

Linux just runs (on workstations). Its not windows.
 
Hi Sherri

Also, is defragging the hard drive necessary?

Nope.

Linux has its own alternative to Windows Registry and other protocols, so that the development of non-contiguous blocks is minimal.

I like all of the above inputs, other than that I don't use any AV (eg Clam).

IMO it is a good idea to have an alternative browser for the occasional time when Firefox might be unavailable.
 
1. You are using the Asus. HDD or SSD ?

2. Leave Bleachbit the hell alone.....it will clean it. Bigtime. !!
If a setting is not quite right......do you fancy the prospect of a reinstall?.....maybe Timeshift will rescue you....it should....but bleachbit can be a disaster. Wait until you have 12 months or more under your belt....then revisit it, and decide then if you need it.

The quick and effective clean up is :

sudo apt update && apt upgrade
sudo apt autoremove

(They are run separately.))

or....you can combine the whole lot:

3. sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade -y && sudo apt autoremove -y && sudo apt clean -y

run this after the long one above: sudo dpkg --configure -a


download Flatsweep from the repository....it will clean any detritus left behind form flatpacks


and once a month or so:

4. sudo du -sh /var/cache/apt .......(this checks cache size)

sudo apt-get clean .......(.this cleans it completely) (Yes, it does)

My favourite: Copy and paste the WHOLE thing and hit enter

#!/bin/bash
sudo apt-get update
#sudo apt-get -y upgrade
sudo apt-get -y dist-upgrade
sudo apt-get -y autoremove

(Thanks for the above, Chris)

The organised way....is to make a document on your desktop...somewhere......copy and paste what you going to use into it.
When you remember to...open it...copy and paste...stick it in a terminal...hit enter....and then go back to more productive stuff

On the priority list....1 being super urgent....and 10 being one day when I get around to it....

.....this type of cleanup could be once a week or once a fortnight....maybe even once a month

Linux does not suffer from the same chaos as windows.

Relax, you are using Linux.
 
  • I can enter commands in the terminal or I can use an app.
    • Being a new user, I opted for an app
Which app ?
 
Give this a look.
 
My favourite: Copy and paste the WHOLE thing and hit enter

#!/bin/bash
sudo apt-get update
#sudo apt-get -y upgrade
sudo apt-get -y dist-upgrade
sudo apt-get -y autoremove

(Thanks for the above, Chris)

That's actually a script you have to compile, name and have in your Path and make it executable, ask me if you want to use it and I'll help.

I call mine

upd

Geez, Brian, I didn't know you liked it so much.
 
The only cleanup I regularly do is for my web browser (I use firefox). I have a tray button runs a script to do the following:
  1. checks if fire fox is running - if so, it warns me and waits for me to close it
  2. whacks the entire ~/.mozilla/ directory
  3. restores ~/.mozilla/ from a stored clean copy
  4. checks to see if there is a saved bookmarks file (a .json file) that is newer than the saved ~/.mozilla/ file (a .tgz file) - if so, it reminds me to load the bookmarks file and waits for me to open firefox before the script exits.
I run this before and after any online banking session, before and after using facebook and fairly often during typical browsing activity. Mind you, I don't use persistent online sessions like googledrive/onedrive, any googledocs, gmail or any of that baloney - I have no idea how that might be affected by my methods.

Regular OS cleanup happens every time I reboot so I don't worry about that, though it's been a couple of months now on this box.
 
I'm still a pretty new convert to Linux Mint 21.3 from Windows...

I've always been obsessive about keeping the system clean because all the left over junk slows things down and interferes with functionality. I ran CCleaner at least once a day.

Being new to Linux, I was wondering if this sort of thing is something I should keep doing.

You should stop thinking windoze...Linux doesn't fill up with crap and slow down. Don't use bleachbit or AV...you don't need to clean the registry because Linux doesn't have one.

Every 6 mths or so you can run a few safe commands in the Terminal...you don't need anything else.
1718687805897.gif

https://www.linux.org/threads/do-you-really-need-to-clean-mint.43752/
 
I am the same as most long term users, above, I only run clam AV occasionally [not for my protection but the windows using family members]
 
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I have used MS-DOS, Windows from 2.0 till 11, MacOS since Snow Leopard I think, and Linux in different variants for a few years. Oh and iPadOS, Android and iOS. And never found it useful to do restarts, clean installs at random moments, or use cleaning software, other than chkdsk on MS-DOS and early Windows. I don't close apps on my phone or tablet. I tested for noticeable differences of course, since so many hobbyists claim that operating systems need help in doing their job, but the only result was either slowing things down (clearing a cache, stopping programs from living in memory, and such), nothing at all, or disaster.
 
Been using Linux for several years. Never used any cleaners. Never had any problems.
Linux is not Windows, it is so much better in almost every way. It will take a while but you will soon see why.
Enjoy the journey into computer freedom.
OG
TC
 
Cleaners? Pah. Complete WASTE OF TIME as far as Linux is concerned...

As for defragging? Um.....nope. Why not? Well, here's a very good article on why you shouldn't defrag drives/partitions in Linux. Especially SSDs.....


The Windows "mind-set" - while necessary for your safety & peace of mind on that platform - is just counter-productive under Linux. Linux was always intended to be used, not endlessly tinkered with.....although "tinkering" is something many of us enjoy. Just not that KIND of "tinkering"..!

@Condobloke :-

Why bother with copy/pasting all that stuff from a document to the terminal, Brian? Simply turn the thing into an executable script; when you want to run it, just click on it. That's what I'd do.

SO much simpler. (If you want, you can set the script to run in the terminal when you run it. That way, you still get to see all of the output...)

It's easy enough to do. While I like to script all my own stuff, I still like to set them up to do the one thing Windoze is good at. Click on it, annnd.....it just runs..!


Mike. ;)
 
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Since I become Linux user (see date of "Joined" under my avatar) I forgot about cleaning my system or disk.
The only thing I clean is remove unnecessary packages with purge option.

System works as fast as on the first day it was installed.
 
As mentioned by @MikeWalsh BleachBit, all sorts of cleaners are waste. In fact these tools are taken from Windows world and have no real value in Linux world.
No need for anti-virus in pure Linux world either unless shari g data with Windows.
If you don't want cookies in FF just force RAM use and disable disk access. I never have seen any FF slowdown with this setup.

What you need to do is:
1. keep system up to date
2. clean unused leftovers
3. properly configure your browser: will give better privacy too. Forget about browser cleaning. This is not how it should be done.
4. remove not used applications

Forget about Windows state of mind
 

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