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Netgear A6200 Wireless USB Stick

Discussion in 'Linux Networking' started by Gomad, Feb 2, 2018.

  1. Gomad

    Gomad Active Member

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    Hey all, I'm very new to Linux, and have just set up Linux Mint 18.3 MATE 64 bit, and I would like to know if I can get my Netgear A6200 Wireless USB stick to work. Both my router and the USB stick have WPS authentication capabilities, but Linux doesn't recognize the stick when I plug it in. I've done a search but couldn't find anything about using this stick with Mint 18.3. Any help will be appreciated. TIA



    Steve
     
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  2. wizardfromoz

    wizardfromoz Well-Known Member

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    Hi Steve

    You could go the ndiswrapper/WINE route as suggested elsewhere by Stan, or you might try seeing if there is a Linux driver already in place for you.

    Some sources indicate that a driver for the A6210 also works for the A6200 - that would not surprise me because I find that sometimes with printers.

    When you get a chance, give us the output from

    Code:
    sudo lshw -C network; lsb_release -a; lsusb
    That is 3 commands separated by semicolons.

    Mine looks like the spoiler content, but I don't use a dongle

    [email protected] ~ $ sudo lshw -C network; lsb_release -a; lsusb
    [sudo] password for chris:
    *-network
    description: Wireless interface
    product: QCA9565 / AR9565 Wireless Network Adapter
    vendor: Qualcomm Atheros
    physical id: 0
    bus info: [email protected]:0d:00.0
    logical name: wlp13s0
    version: 01
    serial: a4:db:30:2c:2d:75
    width: 64 bits
    clock: 33MHz
    capabilities: pm msi pciexpress bus_master cap_list rom ethernet physical wireless
    configuration: broadcast=yes driver=ath9k driverversion=4.13.0-32-generic firmware=N/A ip=192.168.1.102 latency=0 link=yes multicast=yes wireless=IEEE 802.11
    resources: irq:18 memory:d3500000-d357ffff memory:d3580000-d358ffff
    *-network
    description: Ethernet interface
    product: AR8161 Gigabit Ethernet
    vendor: Qualcomm Atheros
    physical id: 0
    bus info: [email protected]:0e:00.0
    logical name: enp14s0
    version: 10
    serial: 08:9e:01:e7:f7:0a
    capacity: 1Gbit/s
    width: 64 bits
    clock: 33MHz
    capabilities: pm pciexpress msi msix bus_master cap_list ethernet physical tp 10bt 10bt-fd 100bt 100bt-fd 1000bt-fd autonegotiation
    configuration: autonegotiation=on broadcast=yes driver=alx latency=0 link=no multicast=yes port=twisted pair
    resources: irq:19 memory:d3400000-d343ffff ioport:3000(size=128)
    No LSB modules are available.
    Distributor ID: LinuxMint
    Description: Linux Mint 18.3 Sylvia
    Release: 18.3
    Codename: sylvia
    Bus 002 Device 002: ID 8087:8000 Intel Corp.
    Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
    Bus 001 Device 002: ID 8087:8008 Intel Corp.
    Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
    Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0003 Linux Foundation 3.0 root hub
    Bus 003 Device 005: ID 04f2:b3b1 Chicony Electronics Co., Ltd
    Bus 003 Device 006: ID 0930:0220 Toshiba Corp.
    Bus 003 Device 003: ID 04ca:0058 Lite-On Technology Corp.
    Bus 003 Device 002: ID 0457:1036 Silicon Integrated Systems Corp.
    Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
    [email protected] ~ $

    Also, these two articles look to be of interest

    https://forum.peppermintos.com/index.php?topic=1238.0 and

    https://zoringroup.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=11434

    With Peppermint - I'd certainly give that a shot, albeit it is a 2014 article. Mark Greaves, aka PCNetSpec, is the head of Peppermint OS, and also used to use that userid at the forum where half a dozen of us were before coming here. He is usually right on the money.

    I can give you some more article references if needed, I have bookmarked them.

    Cheers

    Chris Turner
    wizardfromoz

    BTW - be sure you have a current incremental snapshot (Timeshift) before monkeying with this stuff, in case things head south for the winter. And if they do, I was nowhere near the place, Your Honour.

    Edited - added BTW
     
    #2 wizardfromoz, Feb 2, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2018
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  3. Gomad

    Gomad Active Member

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    I will probably have to give this a try, because one of the two solutions in the links you posted didn't work for me (couldn't unzip a file) and the other didn't make any difference.

    Here's the output you asked for:

    Screenshot at 2018-02-04 10-24-36.png

    It would appear from this readout that my A6200 Stick is visible to Linux, but this was after attempting both of the fixes in the links you posted. (first link can't open the zip file and the second link didn't seem to have any effect.

    I can try this command (above) from the other Linux install (without these fixes) to see if Linux sees the stick on its own.

    In Windows there is a Netgear Genie app that queues the stick to listen for a handshake from the router, (blinking led on the stick that changes color when I push the WPS button on the stick) and then I must also push the WPS button on the router, within a minute or so, and in a few seconds in Windows, they have always established a comm link and I was on line. But I don't see the blinking led on the stick, and pushing the buttons on the stick and the router have no effect. Wi fi is listed as one of my connections in "Network Connections" but it has never connected.

    So if somone can figure out why I can't unzip the file to do the install (see screenshot below, and I tried twice) then I'll have to reluctantly try the ndiswrapper/WINE route.

    Screenshot at 2018-02-04 10-21-33.png


    Lastly, here's a screenshot of the attempt to try the second fix. I got an error at the end of the macro:

    Screenshot at 2018-02-04 09-28-23.png
     
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  4. Gomad

    Gomad Active Member

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    It appears as though Linux sees my A6200 Wireless stick. The following is a screenshot from my "working good" Linux install on HDD1. Maybe I just need to figure out how to enable it?

    Screenshot at 2018-02-04 11-14-29.png
     
  5. atanere

    atanere Moderator
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    Working those blasted midnight shifts again, so I'm only barely able to keep up with things.

    But maybe try this: from your file manager window (not the terminal)... try double clicking on the zipfile icon, and choose "Extract here". It might work, or it might not if the file is damaged or corrupted.

    Cheers
     
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  6. Gomad

    Gomad Active Member

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    Thanks Stan. Sorry you're burning the midnight oil. I've had to change shifts a couple times in my career and it was always a pain.

    I've tried deleting and downloading the .zip file again but I keep getting the same results. I've tried extracting other .zip files with no problem so either this file has issues or it's that "family curse" thing my father told me about when I was a boy. LoL As you've probably noticed by now, Steve's law is usually in effect. Steve's law states that Murphy was an optimist. ha!

    I probably should mention that I use the USB wireless stick because I don't have a wireless card installed.

    I've installed every wireless driver I can find, with no results. In /Menu/search/ I typed "wireless tools" and a list showed up. I installed "wireless tools" and everything to do with "broadcom" and "dkms," to no avail.

    I'm baffled by a couple of things: Mostly that when I click the "connections" icon on the bottom right of my desktop, near the date, it only lists "wired" connections (which I'm attached to). Yet there is certainly a wireless connection available.

    I ran

    Code:
    sudo lshw -C network; lsb_release -a; lsusb
    as Wiz suggested, and my wireless stick certainly is listed. So Linux is seeing it, but I can't understand why a wireless network is not available. Do I have to turn something on somewhere in Mint? Perhaps that is the problem?

    Also, where are you guys getting all these commands? Is there a list somewhere? I'm feeling left out. :confused:

    I've researched, and found a wireless USB device that is supposed to work with Linux here: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Alfa-AWUS0...ost-dual-band-Wi-Fi-USB-Adapter-/111698207758 Thinking about getting one if I can't get my Netgear USB stick working.
     
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  7. atanere

    atanere Moderator
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    Hi Steve,

    Nearly drunk now... you'll have to suffer through this! LOL. You might start to Google info on "Broadcom 43526 Linux" and see what comes up. Your screenshot shows that it is the chip inside your Netgear device. And if you can't tell, we're trying to nudge you into finding solutions on your own. That doesn't mean we're abandoning you... we're just trying to help you to learn. I think we all realize that when you find the solution yourself, it sticks with you better. :D

    I think its quite likely that you can find a solution for the Netgear, but that's no guarantee. If you decide to try to buy another product, I can tell you that I've had troubles with a number of WiFi devices, even those that may be designated as Linux friendly. My trouble is that even if I can get some devices to be recognized and connect... they drop the connections so badly as to be unusable (like to watch a music video, for example). I have not found the solutions to some of those devices myself, but I have not yet totally given up either. Anyway, if you decide to shop around, a product that I would recommend is a TP-Link TL-WN722N. Amazon.com sells them here for a modest price. It is a bit clunky, but the range is far superior with the added antenna than some of the low-profile models you might see.

    OK, gotta run again. Up all night, plowed me and the neighbor's this morning, and now chasing scotch with beer.... it's time for bed. I may have to plow again tomorrow. Ugh. But I finish up the night shifts on Wednesday, so the end is in sight.

    Cheers
    Stan
     
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  8. nuna

    nuna Member

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    The download is corrupt. You can try downloading the file through a web browser.
     
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  9. atanere

    atanere Moderator
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    I'm glad you asked! :D Some of this is from years of experience. But as my previous post suggested, much can be gleaned from using Google to the best of your ability (or better!). You are still only at the beginning of your journey, but you are learning quickly. Remember that Mint is based on Ubuntu, and Ubuntu is based on Debian.... so many problems and solutions you might find with Google for those systems may also apply to your own. You can Google for "Linux command line cheat sheets" and you'll find a number of PDF's that have some of the most common and popular command shown, and those are a great introduction or summary.... but there are also entire books written about using the command line, so don't expect to learn everything.

    I think you are recognizing how powerful the command line is for Linux users. Some folks don't really pursue its capabilities and prefer GUI apps instead, but the CLI (command line interface) is really hard to beat. Many Linux servers run "headless" (no Desktop Environment at all) and the command line is the only interaction available. It's fast, it's efficient... but it can also be unforgiving if you make a mistake. Unlike Windows, Linux will not always ask you, "Are your sure?"

    Take, for example, the Timeshift app you are starting to learn.... Wizard explained that it is based on rsync. The rsync tool is a very powerful backup app, and it is capable of incremental backups on local drives, or across a network. I've been using rsync myself for quite awhile now, so when I run into a disaster I will usually just re-install Linux and then restore my needed files from a backup. For me, this is easier, and I do not restore programs that I may no longer use or want. This works for me, but Timeshift is definitely an awesome app... and I still may explore it more fully later.

    I think that Wizard also warned you: Linux has many options! There are almost always at least two ways of doing anything, and maybe more than two. So he and I may offer differing opinions/options... but we will still be trying to get you to the same place. That's the way that Linux is. And we love it.... as I'm sure you are also beginning to love it as well. I have a sum total of ONE program that keeps me using Windows (7), and when I finally step away from that (a volunteer job that I do)... then I will very likely erase Windows forever.

    Sorry, I told you earlier that I was drunk. Scotch and beer go very well together! :confused::confused::D:D

    Cheers
    Stan
     
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  10. wizardfromoz

    wizardfromoz Well-Known Member

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    Gotta love that @nuna , walks/talks softly and carries a big stick, full of information :D

    Regrets on delay, will be like this until after Wednesday 14th sale of old house, then my time availability will get progressively better (he hopes :rolleyes:)

    Steve, if you are going to make a purchase decision for a new stick/dongle, all well and good. As Linux kernels keep getting updated, there are chances that drivers for or support for the A6200 will just fall through the cracks.

    On the other hand, if you wish to see if you can get it running, then I have the following:

    On your LM 18.3 MATE, you will have the package "git" already installed. ndisgtk is a graphical front-end for ndiswrapper and might need installing it will be in your Repos, so either Synaptic it or apt-get install from Terminal.

    Note, too, that the latter, github, reference has been updated as recently as 10 months ago, and also says

    ... but that is for the A6210, my guess it would also apply with the A6200.

    If you are feeling left out on Linux command, try for yourself the outputs of

    Code:
    ifconfig
    
    and
    
    iwconfig
    and perhaps save the output to a handy text file, can come in useful. You might have to ask a question about whether displaying the output compromises your security, but you may also work that out.

    Cheers and good luck, got other fish to fry ... some bloke is asking about Timeshift, and that (unlike wifi) is something I am familiar with :p

    Wizard
     
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  11. atanere

    atanere Moderator
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    Whew... I believe I think more clearly when I leave the scotch alone! But it did serve its "medicinal purposes" to relieve some muscle pain. And it moved it all to my head! :eek::D

    The commands were basically to determine that your computer did, in fact, see your Netgear adapter. And it's not working because it does not have a driver loaded in the Linux kernel. Many drivers are built-in to the kernel, but not all. This is a common problem... its one of the reasons it is often better to buy some devices that are a little older instead of latest-greatest state-of-the-art (printers, specialty gaming keyboards/mice, etc).

    At least drivers do usually become available for Linux, but it can take some time. Wizard is steering you to another source for drivers above, along with some sources of instructions. I haven't had time to follow up and read them, but I'd guess that if you follow up you will find the solution to make your Netgear work. Once you get it, you might want to write down the steps and save the driver file(s) so you can come back again later, if needed.

    You can probably forget about that "WPS" method of connecting wireless devices with Linux. When your driver is loaded and your device is working, Linux will show you the available networks near you. The real test will be to make sure that the device is stable and doesn't drop connections. It would be nice if the manufacturers provided drivers for Linux... a lot of the troubles that we deal with would disappear if the products were better supported. With these things in mind, if you need to buy a new printer... I'd put HP at the top of my shopping list. :D

    Cheers
     
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  12. wizardfromoz

    wizardfromoz Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I may have a definitive answer to getting the A6200 up and working, but if you subscribe to Murphy being an optimist, then … maybe not? :)

    If you have bought another dongle in the meantime, and are in business, well and good, but if you still have the Netgear, this may be useful.

    https://wikidevi.com/wiki/Netgear_A6200_v2

    … appears to confirm that the A6200 is catered to by Realtek RTL8812AU driver.

    Then there is this page from Diederik De Haas

    https://github.com/diederikdehaas/rtl8812AU

    … which tells how to install using dkms (Dynamic Kernel Module Support framework) - dkms should be already installed on your Linux, it is on my Sylvia MATE. If not, apt-get install it.

    Diederik also has a page here

    https://github.com/diederikdehaas/rtl8814AU

    … which on first sight appears to be the same, but is not.

    The difference between them is one is 2 years old, the other one year old.

    Both appear to relate to the same driver, but the first has support for kernels >= 4.7, the newer one 4.8.

    You and I are using newer kernels, but that is not to say this will not work.

    When you follow the install instructions, use

    sudo su

    to become Root, then copy and paste the commands less the hash which stands for Root.

    When you finish, Exit to leave Root, then Exit to close Terminal.

    Good luck and let us know how you go.

    Wizard
     
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