Mint 21.3 beta is available for download

kc1di

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Condobloke

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Downloaded and added to ventoy......booted.....slowish process, but eventually got there

dual monitors and panels easy to set up....that is a plus!

It is definitely a beta....but for early days more than reasonable.

The advertised additions...right click in nemo to send by email etc etc...various others, all work.

Has already received 10 or so updates

Logged out and back in on Wayland. Quite snappy

Will test more as time goes by
 
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kc1di

kc1di

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I will agree with @Condobloke that the boot time is very long on live. But everything once booted seems to be working well so far. Have not tested it extensively but what I tried worked. Will look forward to the final release later in the Month.
 

The Duck

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Never been concerned about boot times figure it will get there when it does and not before.
I've always went and got a cup of coffee and toast and returned to a ready to use desktop.
 

lesdelc

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My apologies for posting this message here, it does address the slow boot time.
After being away from LinuxMint for 2 years, I returned. I am using 21.2. The boot time is s l o w. I suspect 21.3 beta is slow or slower. Any solution to the slow boot time on 21.2? I tried LMDE 6 on a virtual box and the boot is great.
 
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kc1di

kc1di

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@lesdelc,
the first place to start is to go to a terminal and issue this command
Code:
systemd-analyze blame
This will give you a list of which boot items take the longest to boot and you can tell if something can be done away with that may not be needed. This can speed up boot time considerably On my Mint 21.2 system I found that it was trying to load a non existent database when I removed that from the boot schedule it was much faster.
 

KGIII

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I have a fairly modern refurb with the newest Mint on it and it takes about 35 seconds for the entire thing to boot. I'm going to dump an NVMe SSD into it when I get motivated.

Code:
$  systemd-analyze
Startup finished in 16.835s (firmware) + 5.859s (loader) + 4.065s (kernel) + 8.561s (userspace) = 35.321s
graphical.target reached after 8.554s in userspace
 

lesdelc

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@lesdelc,
the first place to start is to go to a terminal and issue this command
Code:
systemd-analyze blame
This will give you a list of which boot items take the longest to boot and you can tell if something can be done away with that may not be needed. This can speed up boot time considerably On my Mint 21.2 system I found that it was trying to load a non existent database when I removed that from the boot schedule it was much faster.
@lesdelc,
the first place to start is to go to a terminal and issue this command
Code:
systemd-analyze blame
This will give you a list of which boot items take the longest to boot and you can tell if something can be done away with that may not be needed. This can speed up boot time considerably On my Mint 21.2 system I found that it was trying to load a non existent database when I removed that from the boot schedule it was much faster.
 

lesdelc

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Thanks for systemd-analyze blame command. Using the command you provided, I found the problem and removed snapd.service. The boot up time improved immensely.
 
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kc1di

kc1di

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Glad it worked for you. Enjoy!
 

bob466

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I never touch beta and never upgrade either.
m1213.gif
 

Condobloke

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I suspect 21.3 beta is slow or slower.
Please keep in mind you are talking about a BETA os....just released.

It is not meant to be fast.

It is released as a beta for testing purposes
Please read th release notes here : https://9to5linux.com/linux-mint-21-3-beta-is-now-available-for-download-with-cinnamon-6-0

if you note any problems/bugs worthy of reporting to the development team, that can be done HERE
They welcome all feedback
Please stick to their formula for reporting....be concise.

Read their requirements


Reporting bugs

 

lesdelc

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I have a fairly modern refurb with the newest Mint on it and it takes about 35 seconds for the entire thing to boot. I'm going to dump an NVMe SSD into it when I get motivated.

Code:
$  systemd-analyze
Startup finished in 16.835s (firmware) + 5.859s (loader) + 4.065s (kernel) + 8.561s (userspace) = 35.321s
graphical.target reached after 8.554s in userspace
Hi KGllI, I had an old desktop with Win7. I removed two older hard drives and replaced them with one NVMe SSD and Siduction Linux and was blown away by the fast boot time and responsiveness of the entire system. Wow, what a difference!
 
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KGIII

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Wow, what a difference!

Yup. I've got a couple of devices with NVMe SSDs and they're mind blowing. I'll get around to converting this one. I'm just not all that motivated right now.

I don't normally buy older devices but I decided to experiment and see what I could get for $100. It was amazing what I could get. The motherboard supports NVMe natively, but I'm not surer if it's over the SATA bus or using a PCIe lane. So, I'll probably just get a PCIe riser card and an NVMe for that. That way I know it's PCIe and I only have to open the case once.
 


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