lvm2 pv



Condobloke

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Reading this should give you some idea of the inherent complications in using lvm etc

In general you will have a much easier time sticking to the usual default which would be ext4 or ext3

I have 5 hard drives and they are all ext4

Simple

What partition are you talking about here?....are you installing an OS......if so, which one?
 

f33dm3bits

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You use lvm2 pv if you are doing an lvm setup on your disk setup, if you are install Ubuntu during disk setup you have the option to select lvm as an advanced option and it will automatically do a basic lvm setup for you.
 
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Iacceptthelinuxchallenge

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You use lvm2 pv if you are doing an lvm setup on your disk setup, if you are install Ubuntu during disk setup you have the option to select lvm as an advanced option and it will automatically do a basic lvm setup for you.
Well, I used it by mistake 3-4 years ago when I had just started out on linux. I noticed it when I pulled up gparted.
Reading this should give you some idea of the inherent complications in using lvm etc

In general you will have a much easier time sticking to the usual default which would be ext4 or ext3

I have 5 hard drives and they are all ext4

Simple

What partition are you talking about here?....are you installing an OS......if so, which one?
Sorry, meant to say OS not partition.
Been having multiple issues and I wondered if it was as simple as using the lvm2 pv format when I posted my question.
 

f33dm3bits

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Well, I used it by mistake 3-4 years ago when I had just started out on linux. I noticed it when I pulled up gparted.
Then nothing to worry about they are just lables, can you share the output of the following.
Code:
sudo fdisk -l
 
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NorthWest

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Iacceptthelinuxchallenge wrote:
I used it by mistake 3-4 years ago when I had just started out on linux.
Some distributions will install LVM as the default. Last time I used fedora some time ago it did that. It provides the flexibility of altering partition sizes among other things. It's useful in systems that can be subject to unusual or unpredictable changes due to unexpected new needs with new application installations and unpredictably large files and multiple mounts. It can change partitions on the fly. For the less intensive user, it could be considered an unnecessary extra layer of software between the hardware and the user. Although in some installations it's overheads are quite small and unnoticeable, the more intensive users I'm familiar with now tend to use btrfs or zfs which are both filesystems rather than the extra virtual layer that LVM is.
 

f33dm3bits

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the more intensive users I'm familiar with now tend to use btrfs or zfs which are both filesystems rather than the extra virtual layer that LVM is.
I'm still using lvm, I won't be trying btrfs until it becomes the default filesystem on Rhel and I think it may be while because it's still in development. I think remember reading because of licensing zfs can't be shipped by default in the linux kernel so it's not really a good option to be using under Linux. Although not sure how well it would be for a desktop filesystem because from what I've seen from it's meant for raid configurations.
 
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