Lubuntu 21.04 is available for download!

KGIII

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This one is kinda special to me. It's not that it's very different, it's that I devoted hundreds of hours to testing it. The release notes aren't even done yet, but you can download it from the official Lubuntu site.


There are still a few bugs, but nothing show-stopping. The bugs are trivial and worked on, so it's good to go.

It's not an LTS, so you'll need to do that whole release-upgrade thing in about 9 months. I stick with the LTS on my main systems, but that's a personal decision. I tested every daily release along the way, so I hope you like it.
 


Linuxembourg

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Sorry for the noob question, but when will my current version (20.10) update to this?

Also, why does the Ubuntu/Lubuntu version go from x.04 to x.10 to y.04 and so on.
 

KGIII

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In a few days it will offer you the chance to upgrade - assuming you have that setting enabled under 'release upgrade'.

You can also force it. You can probably force it right now, but you'd be hammering on the servers when a bunch of other people are probably doing the same thing.

After the prep work, it's:

Code:
sudo do-release-upgrade
 

Linuxembourg

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I wont have changed the default so it'll presumably update in a few days then. Is this the version with picom? It might be the time to look into / install timeshift!

It better not break my beautiful custom look! It's all i've got!
 

KGIII

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Yes, it will have picom - but compton is still in the menu as picom depends on compton for now.

It should leave files in your user directory alone.

Code:
lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Ubuntu
Description:    Ubuntu 21.04
Release:        21.04
Codename:       hirsute
 

Linuxembourg

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I think rightly or wrongly my custom button icons are all in my home folder (where I don't need root access). And I'm hoping/assuming that my plank app works better or at least as good with picom as compton. I start compton on delay so it works with plank, so I might need to play with that again.

I suppose I'll back up my pulse config files as I've edited the daemon.conf quite heavily to get sound working properly.
 

f33dm3bits

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Sorry for the noob question, but when will my current version (20.10) update to this?

Also, why does the Ubuntu/Lubuntu version go from x.04 to x.10 to y.04 and so on.
The Ubuntu versions are logically versioned based on the year and month a version is released but they also have codenames for each release.
 

KGIII

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Oops! Good catch @f33dm3bits. I completely missed their question.

I'm actually pretty occupied today, so I have a good excuse. Things are down to a dull roar at the moment, but the Lubuntu meeting will be in just another hour.

The release notes are finally published:


(I'm way, way down at the bottom.)
 

f33dm3bits

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This one is kinda special to me. It's not that it's very different, it's that I devoted hundreds of hours to testing it.
Can you explain what kind of testing you did to catch bugs to help out for this release?
 

KGIII

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Every time a new release dropped, I'd download it, check the manifest, and then test it - sometimes both in a VM and on bare metal.

I'd open every application, change settings, change keyboard layout, change resolution, check translation, check power management, make sure every application functioned - checking some extra stuff daily to see if the deeper application settings worked, checked updates, etc...

It takes about an hour to fully test. I test all the applications, even going in and changing the settings on some (not all of them, not every day - usually when they changed in the manifest I'd check those apps even more).

I'd sometimes do installation tests - but those are pretty easy. You just install with various configurations and then reboot to make sure it works with your keyboard layout, language settings, screen resolution, and stuff like that.

It's tedious work. If you find a bug, that's when you can plan on spending another couple of hours researching the bug and filing but reports properly. There's a ton of internal communication that needs to be given attention and added to as needed.

It's rather boring. I only committed to testing this one release, the full release cycle. I'll do the next one. We'll see what kind of time I have left as the pandemic winds down. I've already committed to testing 21.10.

I learned a sh*tload doing this. I learned so much. It was great and that's why I'll do the next one. I have never learned that much about Linux, in that amount of time, as I learned while doing this. (I did a whole lot of extracurricular work and reading.)
 

f33dm3bits

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Another question, do projects like Ubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu, Kubuntu work together at all since in core they are actually quite similar except for using a different DE?
 

wizardfromoz

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wizardfromoz

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I'll try not to derail David's thread but just quickly

It might be the time to look into / install timeshift!
Swing over to my Thread here if you like

https://www.linux.org/threads/timeshift-similar-solutions-safeguard-recover-your-linux.15241/

and we can put in place a strategy for you.

G'day @Linuxembourg :)
Sorry for the noob question, but when will my current version (20.10) update to this?
Never be sorry for such questions, the silly ones are those that go unasked :)

Answer - it won't (update), and this also relates to your #7 post.

It will go kaput - it won't stop working, but you won't get security updates and bug fixes - support for it ends end of July. That happens with 3 out of 4 of the Ubuntu releases (and some of their community flavours), the one with the long-life/support is the LTS (long term support) version released in April, even-numbered years, eg 18.04, 20.04 - next one 22.04.

If you need help working out a strategy to "port" (carry across) your setting, maybe some applications you have installed, &c - start a Thread and people will swing by to help. Don't leave it to close to July or you will be rushing. :)

Wiz

Thanks, David
 

KGIII

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That's handy, does not apply with a lot of Distros
I'm pretty sure it hasn't always been like that, as I recall playing with a beta a few years back and it did not update to the released version.
 

KGIII

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Another question, do projects like Ubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu, Kubuntu work together at all since in core they are actually quite similar except for using a different DE?
There is some overlap where you'll have some of them helping multiple distros. For example, Lubuntu Dev chat room will have people from the other official flavors in it, even if they seldom say anything. They may help if they know something, or even participate in the meetings.
 

f33dm3bits

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I just read this article.
Better integration with Microsoft’s Active Directory.
I did find the official release notes give more detail but I'm not sure what to make of it exactly, do you have any idea?
 
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