Low disk space on “Filesystem root”

Daniel_S.19

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Hello,

I'm a new user of linux, i´ve using Ubuntu 18.04 for a month, and everything has been working properly, until now.

Currently, i'm trying to run a program using docker, and i have not been able to build it because everytime i try to run the command sudo docker build -t virmine . i get an error message that says: Low disk space on "Filesystem root" 0 bytes disk remaining.

I have already used the commands apt-get autoremove and apt-get autoclean, but the error message kepps popping up.

I don´t know why this is happening, since the root partition has 11Gb available, as the GParted screenshot shows.

4850


When i do df -h i get this:

4851


I would really appreciate any help. Thank you.
 


wizardfromoz

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Daniel welcome to linux.org.

I note you have the same question currently at Ubuntu.

https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2432914&goto=newpost

Please decide whether you wish to allow them to give you an answer or to see if our people have one, and close the other.

Otherwise you waste valuable human resources both here and there, and we cannot read minds as to what assistance or advice you are being given.

Thanks

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

Tolkem

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@Daniel_S.19 welcome to the forum. What's the output of this command
Code:
df -hi /
this will show the ionodes availables in / run that command and post the output please.
 

Daniel_S.19

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Daniel welcome to linux.org.

I note you have the same question currently at Ubuntu.

https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2432914&goto=newpost

Please decide whether you wish to allow them to give you an answer or to see if our people have one, and close the other.

Otherwise you waste valuable human resources both here and there, and we cannot read minds as to what assistance or advice you are being given.

Thanks

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
I'm sorry about that. I marked the thread at ubuntu as solved and reported it so it can be closed.

Regarding to my problem, since it looks like it might be related to docker, i uninstalled the docker i had as a snap and i reinstalled it from the official docker repository, version 19.03.5, so now when i do df -h i don't have the /dev/loop18 line, but i keep having the same error code showing up everytime i try to build the program.

Screenshot from 2019-12-11 13-06-31.png
I also tried with sudo docker system prune to free space, but it didn't work.

Thanks for your replies.
 

dos2unix

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I have seen this a few times... when I delete a file that a process is using.
(Usually a log file). Even though the file doesn't really exist on the drive, the OS
thinks it does because the process is holding the file handle open.

Have you restarted this computer and tried again?
Also it seems that /dev/sda5 (which is / in your picture above) also has 11GB available.
 

wizardfromoz

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I'm sorry about that. I marked the thread at ubuntu as solved and reported it so it can be closed.
That's fine, Daniel, and thanks - I am glad you understand :)

Docker is beyond my paygrade currently, but I am quite good at space saving and space recovery, as I run 40 - 50 Linux at a time on one rig, and use GParted almost daily.

I did read in some of my brief travels around the Net regarding Docker, that some containers set a default of 10 GB minimum - I do not know with verMine if that is so, but it may be that it regards your 11 GB free as too small for its requiremennts.

The most effective space recovery, in my opinion, would involve a simple process with GParted, but it involves a few steps.

I produced a small video here - https://linux.org/threads/adding-more-space-and-moving-partition.26173/post-80301

for another Member recently, but the OP (Original Poster) ultimately chose another course to follow,so I did not proceed with further vids.

If you follow it in principle, then what you would do is as follows. It involves /dev/sda5, /dev/sda6 and /dev/sda7. Those partitions are currently mounted (small key icon) and you would need to unmount them first, using either of GParted Live on a stick, or a Live Ubuntu such as you used for installing (Try Ubuntu, not Install)

1. Choose a figure to reduce /dev/sda7 /home by. This is only using 11 GB, so you could reduce it by 50 to 100 GiB easily. Adjust the figures in the 3 fields that show space so that there is 0 GiB at end, and the free space at the top, and commit to the changes.

2. Swap is a case of Swapoff (by right-clicking) and then doing likewise *

If you follow this properly, you can commit all changes, and then have that all appear as Unallocated Space between /dev/sda5 and /dev/sda6.

You can then take /dev/sda5, your / root partition, and expand it to entirely fill with the redeemed space.

Reboot the computer, and you are in business.

* Swap - How much RAM do you have? If unsure

Code:
free -h
Ubuntu installs its own swap alternative, called Zswap. You can see it with

Code:
dmesg | grep -i swap*
HTH (Hope This Helps) and don't forget to answer Tolkem's question at #3 :)

Cheers

Wizard
 



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