Linux/W10 dual boot

Casimir

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Hello, i would like to have 2 differetns SSD on my laptop with one on W10 and the other on Linux. Moreover i'd like that when i start i can choose between both and execute only one of them. How can i do that ?
(ps : sorry for my english)
Thanks a lot :)
 


Vrai

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Does the laptop have two SSD drives installed in it?
If yes, then it should be relatively easy and straight forward to do.

Can you post more information about the laptop and hardware?
 

Vrai

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Hello, i would like to have 2 differetns SSD on my laptop with one on W10 and the other on Linux. Moreover i'd like that when i start i can choose between both and execute only one of them. How can i do that ?
(ps : sorry for my english)
Thanks a lot :)
How I would do it.
1. Download Linux of choice. Make a bootable image of Linux on USB.
2. Take out SSD with Win 10 on it.
3. Insert USB (in USB port) with Linux on it and boot machine from it.
4. Wait for Linux to completely load. Select option to "Install Linux".
5. Follow installer directions.
6. Reboot computer to check everything works.
7. Shut down computer.
8. Replace SSD with Win 10 on it into computer.
9. Restart using Boot Menu selector to choose which drive/OS to boot.

Helpful hint: The more complete information you can provide to those offering to help - the more complete helpful assistance you may receive. :)
 

MadOldDog

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Vrai - all good from my memory (old Guy eh). To elaborate a bit:

  1. One must install the GRUB boot menu on that SSD whilst installing Linux. Not all automatic from my experience.
  2. On the restart with the Windows 10 SSD reinstalled, you want to set the BIOS to boot the Linux SSD. (It mostly does not in my world.)
  3. Once logged into Linux, you want to update the GRUB boot menu which will at this point will not include the Windows 10 OS.
  4. In the command prompt run "sudo update-grub" to have GRUB scan the available boot partitions / drives.
  5. If the Force is with you, on your next restart the GRUB boot menu will show you both OS choices plus a Memory Test option. You may want to change the default choice which is another topic I think.
 

Vrai

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Vrai - all good from my memory (old Guy eh). To elaborate a bit:

  1. One must install the GRUB boot menu on that SSD whilst installing Linux. Not all automatic from my experience.
  2. On the restart with the Windows 10 SSD reinstalled, you want to set the BIOS to boot the Linux SSD. (It mostly does not in my world.)
  3. Once logged into Linux, you want to update the GRUB boot menu which will at this point will not include the Windows 10 OS.
  4. In the command prompt run "sudo update-grub" to have GRUB scan the available boot partitions / drives.
  5. If the Force is with you, on your next restart the GRUB boot menu will show you both OS choices plus a Memory Test option. You may want to change the default choice which is another topic I think.
All very true! Which is one reason I asked for more information. Whereas a dearth of information was forthcoming I decided to elucidate one way of doing it.

Employing the method I described above will leave the Windows boot loader untouched. The user will need to use the laptops Boot Menu to choose which to boot. It is possible to boot into Linux and from there run update-grub and so have the Grub Menu entry for Windows.

One must install the GRUB boot menu on that SSD whilst installing Linux. Not all automatic from my experience.
Very true. But again, without more information such as which distro may be involved I assumed the most likely scenario. Most of the "big" more popular distros either have the installation of Grub already checked off as the default or pointedly ask if and where one would like to install it. Recently I installed Pop!OS on a multi-boot system and it did not ask or even show any "install Grub" option. It just plowed right over my existing Grub which I found quite annoying :|

I realize I could have been more explicit when asking for "more information" but I sometimes think it is more helpful to encourage a user to "help themselves". (Either that or I am just a cranky old Geek! :) ) ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 

MadOldDog

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All very true! Which is one reason I asked for more information. Whereas a dearth of information was forthcoming I decided to elucidate one way of doing it.

Employing the method I described above will leave the Windows boot loader untouched. The user will need to use the laptops Boot Menu to choose which to boot. It is possible to boot into Linux and from there run update-grub and so have the Grub Menu entry for Windows.


Very true. But again, without more information such as which distro may be involved I assumed the most likely scenario. Most of the "big" more popular distros either have the installation of Grub already checked off as the default or pointedly ask if and where one would like to install it. Recently I installed Pop!OS on a multi-boot system and it did not ask or even show any "install Grub" option. It just plowed right over my existing Grub which I found quite annoying :|

I realize I could have been more explicit when asking for "more information" but I sometimes think it is more helpful to encourage a user to "help themselves". (Either that or I am just a cranky old Geek! :) ) ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
I don't find you a "cranky old geek". You may find me to be a boring old Technical Writer . But I intend to learn from you and anybody else who will put up with me, and Bless You.
 


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