Linux vs solar weather

Star Rider

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Hi !
I am both a Linux and astrophysics enthusiast. Thus I asked myself a question.

Do you know what a solar storm is? It's an emission of very fast particles (protons, neutrons, electrons and ions) and energetic waves (UV, maybe even X-rays) from the Sun. Minor eruptions occurs every cycle (11.2 years) and both the Earth's magnetic field and atmospheric ozone are enough to protect us. But sometimes, a peak of solar activity occurs, resulting in a very powerful eruption (see the events of July 1859 and February 2012. Luckily we got protected from this last one, but there is a probability a much more powerful one could occur). These eruption can result in telecommunications failures, electric problems and in the worst situation, harm unprotected electronic devices, altering both their components and their storage.
I know there are ways to protect electronic devices from such events, but I don't know if it's the case of the servers on which the Linux source code.

Knowing all that, I got curious and here is the question: is Linux source code safe from these events?
 


brickwizard

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Interesting question and well beyond our brief
I think if you need an answer to that question you would de better asking the development team

 

kc1di

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Since source codes for most linux Distros are stored on many servers not just one. It would seem very unlikely that all of them would be so affected at once. There are multiple backup systems for most data bases also. I'm quite sure that the source would be redundant enough to survive even a major solar flare. If it was that bad I think we would be worried about much more than Linux. Like the electric grid and other essential communications. Been a Ham radio op for many years and have been through several hugh flares in the past and seen HF radio comms down for hours or days. But they always come back. So I don't worry too much about the Flares.
Any way find the speculation interesting.
This article discussed Solar Cycle 25 which is just beginning Solar minimum was estimated to be in December of 2019 so we are about 9 years away from solar maximum.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

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February 2012. Luckily we got protected from this last one
It also was a very minor one as it didn't even come up to the scale of the Carrington event 1859. but by all accounts we missed a doozie of a solar storm a few ago that would have been worse than that 1859. What people over look is that we have thousands of kilometres of metal cable strung up to carry power all over the joint plus thousands of various transformers both on the supply side and consumer side of the supply, and just going by the Carrington event there is one big heck of magnetism to induce buckoos of current in them. The telegraphers did not have to use their batteries for several hours due to the storm; that being said it will effect the hardware more directly though the software is dependent on the hardware. So you can draw your own conclusions
But as @brickwizard stated it is beyond our brief on this site.
 

Star Rider

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It would seem very unlikely that all of them would be so affected at once.
You are right, after further research (and reflection) this kind of scenario appears to be unrealistic.

Any way find the speculation interesting.
we have thousands of kilometres of metal cable strung up to carry power all over the joint plus thousands of various transformers both on the supply side and consumer side
This speculation was based on what I know about electromagnetic waves and high-speed and high-energy particles (But this proves I still have to learn, I am still a student). I missed some informations I found in the links you shared, in your answers and further researches.
 

kc1di

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Glad to be of help :)
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

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I am still a student
We all are students no matter the subject even what we are well endowed with knowledge of a subject there is still more that we are ignorant of on the subject; that includes me!
What I wrote came from my understanding of Faraday's law of induction that I learnt when studying to become an electrician which basically is "Where you have conductor and a magnetic field passes through the conductor a current and voltage is induced in the conductor." The value of the current induced is dependent on the strength of the magnetic field cutting through the conductor, thus higher the magnetic field strength the higher the current density in the conductor and vice versa. But there are other factors to consider as well; such as the length of the conductor. The longer the conductor the greater the current induced.
Here are two Wikipedia entries that will help you understand a little clearer.
the first is Electromagnetic induction
the next is on Magnetic Inductance which helps to explain the workings of electrical transformers.

Hope you find these useful on your quest of knowledge.
As Socrates said I cannot teach you anything all I can do is teach you to think.
 
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