Linux System - clone, archive of the whole

Goss

New Member
Code:
Device     Boot     Start        End    Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sda1            2048     206847     204800  100M  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda2          206848  342042623  341835776  163G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda3       342042624  404957183   62914560   30G 83 Linux
/dev/sda4       404959230 3907028991 3502069762  1.6T  5 Extended
/dev/sda5       404959232  446902271   41943040   20G 83 Linux
/dev/sda6  *    463683584  526597646   62914063   30G 83 Linux
/dev/sda7       526600192  568543231   41943040   20G 83 Linux
/dev/sda8       585324544 3907028991 3321704448  1.6T  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda9       568545280  585312255   16766976    8G 82 Linux swap / Solaris
this is sudo fdisk -l from my main hard drive,
as you see well, it is quite a mess,

I would like to rearrange partitions,
but i would like to learn something new from you as well - system backup

My current system is Debian Like

Help me start thinking properly:
about system backup - cloning what i have, and use it to start from empty hard drive,
how to properly do it?

but there will be later topics like:
*proper arrangement of partitions
[now i would do 30 GB for linux, 100 GB for home, 3 GB for Swap, and rest for files - what the best practices are suggesting?]
*file systems - ext4 or Btrfs?
*is there something i should know, but i may not?
*at the end there is grub waiting as well (ups!) - while you install linux it is setuping automagicaly, but if you install from clone? no idea
 
Last edited:


rado84

Active Member
Help me start thinking properly:
about system backup - cloning what i have, and use it to start from empty hard drive,
how to properly do it?
Use Clonezilla. You don't need instructions for it, it's pretty self-explanatory, if you carefully read the instructions on every screen. When I used it for the first time in my life, I had never seen it before and yet I did it with Clonezilla - a complete system backup, down to the last byte.
Go to Clonezilla's site, download the ISO and put it on a USB stick, then run it outside of the OS. You can put it on a CD or DVD as well but then you'll have to wait for it to start for a few minutes whereas from a USB stick it runs 10 times faster than it does from a DVD.
 

Vrai

Active Member
Use Clonezilla. You don't need instructions for it, it's pretty self-explanatory, if you carefully read the instructions on every screen. When I used it for the first time in my life, I had never seen it before and yet I did it with Clonezilla - a complete system backup, down to the last byte.
@rado84
That was exactly my experience the first time I used Clonezilla. I had very little clue as to what I was doing but I read every screen and followed the directions. Worked like a charm :) I have been using Clonezilla ever since.
 

rado84

Active Member
@rado84
That was exactly my experience the first time I used Clonezilla. I had very little clue as to what I was doing but I read every screen and followed the directions. Worked like a charm :) I have been using Clonezilla ever since.
:)
I've used it so many times in the past 2 years that now when I have to backup or restore, I do it all by a reflex, without even looking at the screen cuz I know almost by heart what and where to type and what to select. :D
 

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