Linux Popularity vs Windows

Eddie Paul Litz

Active Member
Credits
461
What is the current popularity of Linux compared to Windows?
 


Condobloke

Well-Known Member
Credits
15,156
Does it matter ?

Linux is not windows....and the reverse is therefore also true

So the topic is without merit.
 

Eddie Paul Litz

Active Member
Credits
461
I know Linux isn't Windows. I was just wanting to know the Linux popularity compared to Windows in %.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
Credits
15,156
do you use google or duckduckgo ?
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
Credits
15,156
You have been a member here since May, 2018

By now you will know how to go about conducting a search.

eg: popularity windows vs linux

Good luck.

Let us know the outcome.
 

dcbrown73

Well-Known Member
Credits
2,893
I've been using Linux for around 25 years. Over the years I've installed Linux on the desktop probably more times than most people (definitely not all) and I will be blunt here. For general everyday uses for my needs. Linux never surpassed Windows in usability across the board for me.

Around 2016, I finally gave up on trying to use Linux on the desktop. That isn't to say that I couldn't use Linux on the desktop. I most certainly can. It is usable, but there are areas of my everyday life that it takes "work making it work" or it completely fails to work at all in a few cases.

Actually, I quit installing Android early (beta) releases too because, today. I just don't have time to fight with broken software if it isn't absolutely necessary.

The biggest issue with Linux has always been the divided nature of "choice". It has created a massive amount of issues on the Linux sound system side, multiple different desktops, and several less than efficient ways to create a great stable desktop that is useful and as bug-free as possible for most usage requirements.

Please do not don't come at me to say, "Windows isn't bug-free either", I don't live in a box. I know this. The thing Windows has going for it is exactly what Linux on the desktop's problem is. It doesn't work universally across my daily life.

Linux on the server IMO cannot be beaten except in the world of Enterprise Domain management.. (maybe a few side cases) I built my almost 25 year Linux career on it and will continue to use it even after retirement because it is a solid and trusted tool for what I want to do.

I hope one day Linux on the desktop will solidify into a 100% usable all-the-time desktop for me, but that day has not yet arrived.

For those of you who do use Linux on the Desktop. I salute you. If it ever is to reach critical mass, it needs users to get there. Even more so, it needs you guys to push the developers to work together. Division and many options for basic requirements aren't helping. The developers need to focus on a common goal and plow all their efforts in achieving a single unified desktop system.

Dave
 

SpongebobFan1994

Active Member
Credits
4,045
I've been using Linux for around 25 years. Over the years I've installed Linux on the desktop probably more times than most people (definitely not all) and I will be blunt here. For general everyday uses for my needs. Linux never surpassed Windows in usability across the board for me.

Around 2016, I finally gave up on trying to use Linux on the desktop. That isn't to say that I couldn't use Linux on the desktop. I most certainly can. It is usable, but there are areas of my everyday life that it takes "work making it work" or it completely fails to work at all in a few cases.

Actually, I quit installing Android early (beta) releases too because, today. I just don't have time to fight with broken software if it isn't absolutely necessary.

The biggest issue with Linux has always been the divided nature of "choice". It has created a massive amount of issues on the Linux sound system side, multiple different desktops, and several less than efficient ways to create a great stable desktop that is useful and as bug-free as possible for most usage requirements.

Please do not don't come at me to say, "Windows isn't bug-free either", I don't live in a box. I know this. The thing Windows has going for it is exactly what Linux on the desktop's problem is. It doesn't work universally across my daily life.

Linux on the server IMO cannot be beaten except in the world of Enterprise Domain management.. (maybe a few side cases) I built my almost 25 year Linux career on it and will continue to use it even after retirement because it is a solid and trusted tool for what I want to do.

I hope one day Linux on the desktop will solidify into a 100% usable all-the-time desktop for me, but that day has not yet arrived.

For those of you who do use Linux on the Desktop. I salute you. If it ever is to reach critical mass, it needs users to get there. Even more so, it needs you guys to push the developers to work together. Division and many options for basic requirements aren't helping. The developers need to focus on a common goal and plow all their efforts in achieving a single unified desktop system.

Dave
I couldn't agree more!

There's too many chefs in the kitchen when it comes to Linux. While I'll give it credit in it being FOSS and privacy-oriented, and developing some kind of following with a number of companies and organizations, I've also ranted about it's problems multiple times and feel no need repeat myself.

My question for the community is this: What is so wrong with setting up a cooperative LLC where there's choices when it comes to operating systems?
 

f33dm3bits

Gold Member
Gold Supporter
Credits
24,764
Around 2016, I finally gave up on trying to use Linux on the desktop. That isn't to say that I couldn't use Linux on the desktop. I most certainly can. It is usable, but there are areas of my everyday life that it takes "work making it work" or it completely fails to work at all in a few cases.

For those of you who do use Linux on the Desktop. I salute you. If it ever is to reach critical mass, it needs users to get there. Even more so, it needs you guys to push the developers to work together. Division and many options for basic requirements aren't helping. The developers need to focus on a common goal and plow all their efforts in achieving a single unified desktop system.
Can you give a few examples of how GNU/Linux doesn't work for all your personal use cases as a desktop just out of interest to see how it differs from me?

I've been using GNU/Linux for about 11-12 years and when, I dual-booted shortly and shortly after I wiped my Windows partition only ran GNU/Linux as my daily driver for my desktop while I was still learning and it also helped me learn. Eventually I understood how everything work and I even ran the few games I played on GNU/Linux back than using Wine/Crossover and Steam, I enjoyed myself and I made it work and just love working with GNU/Linux. It will be interesting to see what happens to GNU/Linux gaming once the Steam Deck arrives.

I'm subscribed to the linux_gaming subreddit and I daily see threads where people are switching to GNU/Linux for gaming and ask for advice about gaming on GNU/Linux so I have I hopes. On the other hand I could care less about mass adoption of GNU/Linux because I think people should use what they prefer as long as long as they know there are more options available. If someone shows true interest and are is willing to learn I'll help where I can and if not that's okay as well. I recently had a friend who had some laptop issues with Windows, I spend quite a few hours trying to help him fix the problems he was having. It made me want to throw his laptop out the Window so I'm glad I don't have to deal with that on a daily basis and it makes me appreciate GNU/Linux even more for having control choice, freedom and choice.

As for so much choice it had it's advantages and disadvantages, Redhat pulled(half-way) the plug on CentOS and more more 3 RHEL clones were created. I see that as an advantage, as for too much choice I can see how that is a disadvantage for mass adoption because it confuses newcomers. I'm currently running a distribution someone recommended to me two years ago and I really love the distribution. If that distribution were to disappear over night I could easily switch over to any other distribution the next day.

The problem I see a lot is that newcomers to GNU/Linux approach GNU/Linux as Windows and expect it to work like Windows and are not open to learning a new OS/distribution with the hundreds of different distributions that can be scary coming from a system where mostly everything is dictated for you to have more choice than you know what to do with. So maybe he GNU/Linux community and anyone interested in GNU/Linux should meet each other halfway?

The GNU/Linux community should work more on a way for people to more easily learn how GNU/Linux works and focus more on helping people understand the GNU/Linux system instead of focusing on learning "a distribution" Then new people who want to start using GNU/Linux should be more open to accept that GNU/Linux != Windows and they should be more open to putting some effort into wanting to learn instead of just expecting to be able to just switch from one to the other and expecting not to run into learning bumps and frustrations that come with that.

My question for the community is this: What is so wrong with setting up a cooperative LLC where there's choices when it comes to operating systems?
What's a cooperative LLC?
 

KGIII

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
26,474
This is a complex question.

In the server realm? Linux use dwarfs Windows use.
In the mobile realm? There's no Windows to speak of, but lots of 'technically Linux' devices - *billions of them*.
In the desktop realm? Windows use dominates Linux use.
 

kc1di

Active Member
Credits
1,875
Windows is slowly moving away from the Desktop to a Desktop as a service cloud format. So in a sense this question will become mute in the that we would be talking apples and oranges.
This article puts it well.
DAAS

There have been many over the last 25 years calling for linux to produce one Linux distro that competes with Windows. But I for one don't want to see that I like the choices and opportunities provided by the differing ways some DE's and OS's work. There is great variety and it's fun to learn and use. By the way have used Windows here in 20 years and haven't missed a thing.
 

captain-sensible

Well-Known Member
Credits
14,415
Linux is worst of all 3, and most-likely for a number of reasons
I would say useage of Windows has dropped the most relative to its useage at the start . Android was nothing , then exponential increase then leveling out. Linux useage not as great as Windows; it hasn't flat-lined only leveled out . Where's a statistician when you need one -Rrrr just remembered @KGIII what does the graph say to you ?
 
$100 Digital Ocean Credit
Get a free VM to test out Linux!

Members online


Latest posts

Top