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CrazedNerd

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i'm currently using "The Linux Command Line" by william shotts, second paperback edition, and i have to say it's a great and current book. I only found one thing so far (i'm on page 40), that doesn't work: he says "cp -r dir1 dir2" will copy contents from the first directory to the second, but it doesn't. You have to do it like this: "cp dir1/* dir2".
 


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1- Guides already on Linode.com on DigitalOcean.com
2- Official documentation
3- Set up a command line virtual machine or any command line tool as a basic lab
4- Will to experience and test and build.
5- online free videos.
So many guys on youtube.
I like videos bc the way things on linux are done can be done in different ways with different tools.
I like those videos that explaining everthing, and I don't like those which just tell you about some lazy scripts from gits. Most of those lazy scripts don't work. And I stay away from Indian youtubers. Very bad English, very bad explaining, very bad content, very poor explanations. I just can't forget those brown hands soldering cellphone camera module to a USB cable and snap to PC and work. They are all the same.
I just remember "HackerSploit" since he has an accent and I like the way he speaks English. Very easy to understand. And his channel is very old and updated frequently. He's worth donation. However his old YT vids, the font size of commandline is small. I always change command line to bigger size for demonstrations.
There are many youtube linux wizards out there. I find "ChrisTitusTech" has great content for the "linux experience" itself as he mentions it. The list will be updated.

I would stay away from Nullbyte. The linux security guide had a config mod to prevent rubber ducky attack, which locked my keyboard out. and then had me lose an installation. Stay away from them since they have lots of bells and whistles, but they don't deliver it.
 

CrazedNerd

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One of my favorites has been the VimAdventures game/tutorial: https://vim-adventures.com/
i don't really like it, because it doesn't actually help you use vim to your advantage...the main thing it does it teach you how to use hjkl which you can't do in insert mode anyways. I've recently been using vim exclusively because nano doesn't really have a whole lot of navigation options, i think the trick with vim is overall is learning how to hack it to your advantage. For example, you can use some of sed's best features from inside the program:

Code:
:51,60d

That will erase all text from 51 to 60 and put the cursor at 51, doing that in nano is a lot more annoying and cumbersome with the "mark" feature.

You can also execute linux commands from vim's command mode, but that is a whole other can of worms...
 

MattWinter

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i don't really like it, because it doesn't actually help you use vim to your advantage...the main thing it does it teach you how to use hjkl which you can't do in insert mode anyways.
Yeah, that's the main point of level 1. If you go beyond that, it's a really thorough introduction to the rest of vim. It doesn't get in to splitting the screen, plugins, or customizing vim with colors or remapping keys, but it does get you pretty competent pretty quickly. Later levels absolutely do get in to deletion, insertion, buffers, search...all kinds of stuff.
 

starsconty

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I am still learning about Fedora Workstation and the install went well, the updates just takes long to install. Reminds me of Windows.
 

CrazedNerd

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I just recently started on this book again, I'm going to go ahead and start learning C because I really want to better understand the lower level stuff as well, but this book here has a really huge amount of information about how to make practical shell scripts, I'm very excited:


that link allows you to order the ebook and the pdf at once, which is ideal. You don't want to end up paying to much for ebooks alone, it's kinda a ripoff.

That's a book for advanced shell scripting though, it's not meant for beginners.
 
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KGIII

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I believe you'll find the kernel is moving to Rust.

While I fondly remember C, I'm not sure what C's future looks like. Will it end up like FORTRAN or COBOL? I do not know and I don't dare speculate.

By the way, if you can code in either of those (or MUMPS) well enough to maintain legacy code, you can pretty much write your own paycheck.
 

CrazedNerd

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I believe you'll find the kernel is moving to Rust.

While I fondly remember C, I'm not sure what C's future looks like. Will it end up like FORTRAN or COBOL? I do not know and I don't dare speculate.

By the way, if you can code in either of those (or MUMPS) well enough to maintain legacy code, you can pretty much write your own paycheck.
Writing your own paycheck...hmmm!

I mostly want to learn c as a way of better understanding c++, rust, and/or assembly language. The guy who wrote the c for dummies book in 2021 expressed that he thinks c isn't going anywhere (as in, programmers will continue to use it), im not too concerned. What i want to do is write system applications and games, and maybe some prank not-malicous viruses. I think writing android games would be fun, non-contractual way to make a little extra income. Im more of a hobbiest orientation personally, i just think making programs is fun.
 
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sphen

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If you are writing C code, than I highly recommend:
C: A Reference Manual, 5th edition by Harbison and Steele

It is a very helpful C language reference to have on hand as you write code.
 
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