Linux & Fragments, Linux & Corrupted Files & Errors?

Eddie Paul Litz

Active Member
Does Linux files ever get fragmented & get corrupted files & errors?
Also, does Linux get cluttered w/ useless files?
 
Last edited:


wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
G'day Eddie Paul

General answer is no, mostly. At least in comparison to certain other Operating Systems.

If you want a more specific answer, you will have to provide more specific information.

Do you have a problem?

Cheers

Wizard
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
Also, does Linux get cluttered w/ useless files?
As Wizard said, Linux does not suffer much from these problems. "Clutter" and "useless" are a bit subjective, and a lot depends on how you use your system. You might read the man page for the apt command and examine the difference between sudo apt remove [package] versus sudo apt purge [package]. You might want to look into the fsck command too.

Useless files that clutter your system are often called cruft or lint. There is a tool called fslint that can help clean up your system. Like any tool of this nature, you should backup your important files first... Linux tools can be very unforgiving if you don't use them properly. Here is an article that describes fslint a bit.

Cheers
 

Eddie Paul Litz

Active Member
I'm using Windows currently, I'm thinking about switching back to Linux if things don't go good for me w/ Windows. I'm just asking in case I want to switch back.
 
issues can arise in Linux on files for a number of reasons: log files and /tmp can sometimes build up to a size, orphan files etc ; also from my experience in 3rd world where electricy can go off at a bad time can mess things up. So far on Slackware there has never been an occasion so far where I couldn't rescue my system. Tools include "built in" fsck. I've done this two ways boot up Slackware , issue comes up on files & i take over with fsck. Also i've booted knoppix on a USb and used it to fix corrupted files on PC hard drive. For cleaning up i use bleachbit as normal user. Also for Slackware when you install it gives option of creating a usb rescue boot.
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
I follow these ways of cleaning and have zero complaints or problems.


 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
For cleaning up i use bleachbit as normal user.
If you decide to use BleachBit make certain that you understand each feature and exactly what each feature cleans / removes before enabling it.

BleachBit installs with no default safe settings and if used haphazardly it is almost certain to remove more than is needed and will break a Linux Distro beyond repair.

BleachBit is not for the novice user so use with caution and at your own risk.

Just my 00.02 cents.
 
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Condobloke

Well-Known Member
That means, capitain-sensible, that you are not a novice user, and use it with a suitable degree of caution.

I agree with poorguy.....used without that suitable degree of caution, it can wipe a distro out in smart time !!

This is a good time/place to recommend the use of Timeshift.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
well i've used it several times no problem
I don't doubt it, and more power to you :)

Not sure of your Linux history, and I don't do condescending/patronising as you will learn if you have not already.

Brian and Tom and I have been around Linux Forums helping (at least two sites in each of our cases) for maybe 20 years or more combined, and have seen dozens of cases where Bleachbit proved to be problematic.

That being said, I have just downloaded a new Distro which ships with Bleachbit installed and I intend to take it for a spin. However, I have my Timeshift to fall back on should anything head south for the winter.

Cheers

Wizard
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
well i've used it several times no problem
My post # 7 was not directed at you captain-sensible it was for the benefit of the OP Eddie Paul Litz.

My mistake for failing to mention Eddie Paul Litz as the beneficiary.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
and speaking of the OP....we are not seeing/hearing a great deal from you.... @Eddie Paul Litz
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
For the uninitiated ......
e2fsck' is essentially a shortcut saying it's an ext2 filesystem. They all behave the same way and check the filesystem for errors. You're correct that they can be dangerous - never run fsck on any mounted filesystem (root partition or otherwise), as it can lead to data loss
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
....and....this is probably a good time to wonder.....where's Eddie ?? (the OP)
 
@salamta i think e2fsck will only work if file system is ext2, mine (slackware is ext4 ) so unmounting is good but maybe do a few other checks :
# df -T
# mount | grep "^/dev"
//then once partition is found
/dev/sda2 on / type ext4 (rw)
use fsck something like
fsck.ext4 /dev/sda2 -v -y
 

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