Linux, ARGB Lighting and custom watercooling!

BigBadBeef

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I've been out of the loop in regards to pc building since RGB and watercooloing was in diapers, that is 6 years right about now (That's what happens when you build quality lol). I am doing research to build a stonking new high-end pc that will bring me peace and happiness for the next 6-8 years, like this one has, where I haven't had as much as a fan fail on me since I assembled it.

So my next victi#AHEM# system of choice will be a custom watercooled Azza pyramid build with lighting themed on colors orange and yellow, maybe some red thrown into it. I'm talking about a theme which screams "what ancient egypt would look like if it survived until the year 2500" build. And it will run Linux... mostly... as much as possible... at least untill it fully supports VR (wtf is taking so long, dangit).

I already know a few facts about it

- I know that argb is controlled either through custom headers on the motherboard or through argb hubs that can be controlled by remote (I don't want that).
- I also know that some watercooling manufacturers supply you with a custom header that you stick into a fan port that lets you control the speed of the pump.

What I am not sure about is how much of this can be controlled in the BIOS menu, because we all know that Linux control of aforementioned aspects is at present spotty at best. I suppose you need questions to answer:

1) What would I need to watch out for in order to have complete control over all hardware lighting on a BIOS level? (I say I didn't want custom argb hubs, but I would accept them if there's no other way)

2) Is there a way to map the aforementioned pump output to either CPU or GPU temperature on a BIOS level?
 


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BigBadBeef

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Maybe this has some functionality that you are looking for?
You should know that the aforementioned pump output goes into the fan headers. One or two pins aren't even present, I think the one(ones) that were supposed to supply power to a would-be fan. The BIOS menu detects it as a chassis fan. So basically I would just need to map it to the component most likely to emit the most heat.
 
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