Laptop Hard Drive

Christina

Active Member
I finally got a new laptop! It is an HP 15.6 touchscreen. I would like to put a different hard drive in it to install Ubuntu rather than dual boot or wipe the one it came with (Windows 10). Can anyone give advice on what to get? Does not have to be huge lol. I just don't know enough about them to be confident in ordering one....
 


Bayou Bengal

Active Member
Need an exact model number to look up the specifications of your laptop.
 

LinHappyMan

Member
SSDs if you can afford them! Even a small Silicon Power one will cut the mustard then some!

If you rather buy your own brand be sure your opting for MLC OR SLC if you want it to "built to lasts". TLC drives should be avoided like the plague since they may dies out quite quickly and are not cheap enough to justifies the awful lifespan.
 

Christina

Active Member
SSDs if you can afford them! Even a small Silicon Power one will cut the mustard then some!

If you rather buy your own brand be sure your opting for MLC OR SLC if you want it to "built to lasts". TLC drives should be avoided like the plague since they may dies out quite quickly and are not cheap enough to justifies the awful lifespan.
LOL, I have no idea what all that means hahaha
 

LinHappyMan

Member
LOL, I have no idea what all that means hahaha
Firstly an SSD just means a "solid state drive" and as the name implies there are no moving parts. Whereas a traditional HDD (hard disk drive) have moving parts (the read and write heads and arm assembly).

What does that means for you when you switch to a SSD? That is means...

1. Lower power draw which obviously means your laptop's battery will lasts longer and it will be cooler. Than having a similar HDD in there.
2. HUGE performance boost. We are talking almost instantaneous booting (less than 30 seconds).
3. Stable, a new HDD may fails on you but in SSDs assuming you pay up for even a half decent one it will likely be more stable than a comparable HDD. More on that later...

Now SSDs just like anything else come in different formats and so on.

A SLC (Single Level Cell) drive is the best that money can buy. However there rarely any that are within the consumer reach. So generally these are reserved for enterprise usages. Where reliability and operations are at absolute premium for obvious reasons.

Down the price scale and the quality spectrum are MLC (Multi Level Cell) drives. These bad boys will still typically outrun a TLC (Triple Level Cell) drive by about 2 to 10 times depending on the exact brand purchased. Pricing and storage comprises are also worthwhile if your wanting your drive to lasts any significant amount of time.

Now if your looking for the "gas station sushi" drives than TLC drives are just that. They will "get you by" but don't expect them to lasts years on end.

Hope this clears things up!
 

Bayou Bengal

Active Member
15-bs020wm serial CND7274LG8 Is this what you need?
Here is your specs from HP. https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c05847637. It says you have a conventional 5400 rpm SATA drive. A typical 2.5 inch SSD should plug right in. Now the question is "How easy is it to access the current drive?" Do what Lin said and inspect the bottom of the computer. If it is accessible from the bottom, the change is simple. There should be some kind of symbol or a large obvious plate held down with some small screws. If not, take it to a repair shop as the keyboard will have to be removed to replace the drive.
 

botnet

New Member
Oh wait I confused myself . For a 2nd I thought you wanted to run two os's on two drives.

If you looking at buying hard drives remember if it sounds too good to be true it probably sucks .I would personally stay away from those Samsung and entry level Seagate drives .If you want something fast and not worried too much about the space you should get a solid state .If you want a "normal" drive with a good amount of space then get a hdd (hard disk) .

WD Blue and black range isn't bad at all .Samsung's evo is a Ssd and it's the worth the price (Google it)
...
You said its a new laptop so just FYI replacing the drive will void the warranty .I hope you know that .If there's screws on the case then you are not allowed to open them(take them out) .
 

Christina

Active Member
Here is your specs from HP. https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c05847637. It says you have a conventional 5400 rpm SATA drive. A typical 2.5 inch SSD should plug right in. Now the question is "How easy is it to access the current drive?" Do what Lin said and inspect the bottom of the computer. If it is accessible from the bottom, the change is simple. There should be some kind of symbol or a large obvious plate held down with some small screws. If not, take it to a repair shop as the keyboard will have to be removed to replace the drive.
I never even looked at the bottom till now lol. It is not going to be as easy as the ASUS I have. I change back and forth all the time in it. This has screws on bottom but looks like I will have to take it clear off instead of just a small spot. I will have to do some thinking now. And yes I know it voids the warranty.....
 

botnet

New Member
Even replacing the OS will, so it's given. Which is why I have a love and hate relationships with laptops.

Correct but with the os there are a few ways around it .You just need to have the windows os installed so you can always install it before you take it in to the store . However with the casing it's different, there are screws which contain Loctite so if at anytime you remove a screw the manufacturer will know.

Christina, if it was up to me I wouldn't touch the os or the hardware on the laptop .You must remember with technology something can always happen .So a new laptop can work perfectly now and something can happen tomorrow and when that happens you know from a fact that your warranty is intact so you won't have the added stress ..Give it some time .
 

LinHappyMan

Member
Correct but with the os there are a few ways around it .You just need to have the windows os installed so you can always install it before you take it in to the store .
What about dates and so on? I would think if they WANTED to they can indeed go into the installation to see if it was the original or the customer just tried reinstalling it or whatever.

However with the casing it's different, there are screws which contain Loctite so if at anytime you remove a screw the manufacturer will know.
The only reason they can do this is because no one will contest them (it's too much to take them to court over screws and stickers).

Because it's technically illegal for them to do such. Legally speaking as you are competent about repairing and replacing things you should be able to get warranty for the remainder (soldered CPU, mobo and so on).

So it's really idiotic that they take advantage of the complicated and costly legal system just to void out warranties that are illegally being voided (IE for replacing a drive you know how to do in the first place and the device offer such feature).
 

Bayou Bengal

Active Member
I never even looked at the bottom till now lol. It is not going to be as easy as the ASUS I have. I change back and forth all the time in it. This has screws on bottom but looks like I will have to take it clear off instead of just a small spot. I will have to do some thinking now. And yes I know it voids the warranty.....
After further research, I am pretty sure you'll have to remove your keyboard to replace the hdd.
 

botnet

New Member
Well, I can already tell I HATE Windows 10 lol. I like simple like my Ubuntu was.....

I can't really find anything regarding the warranty of hp machines for the last few years but I did find that .That's on the Hp site and it seems like the hardware is still covered . My understanding is this and I'm pretty sure I can be wrong , the operating systems installed on the laptops you purchase are OEM copies with bundled software .I know for a fact that there are corporate companies which will remove this because of bloat so I think you will be safe if you dualboot that system or remove it completely as long as you match the os when you need to use the warranty.

Just to be sure . Message HP with the serial and product number and tell them you need a Linux distribution for work purposes (Lie) and see if they will still cover the warranty if you dualboot .I doubt there will be any harm in that .
 

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Christina

Active Member
Sometimes we are forced to use Windows 10 ..Sniff sniff ..Tears fall to the ground ..
Yea, I might be forced to for awhile but hopefully not for long.... There is just too much crap to deal with on Windows.... all the pop ups and such that I don't need lol.... I am not real computer savvy so not sure I want to try dual boot but I may..... or I may create a copy of Windows 10 for a back up on dvd and just install linux
 

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