kdevelop installation

So, I decided I want work on my programming homework. I just installed kdevelop. It wont compile or build, so I'm missing something like a package that goes along with it. I was told it depends on your distribution too.
 


atanere

Well-Known Member
What won't compile or build? KDevelop? Or your homework? What errors do you get? If KDevelop is the problem, don't build it from source. Follow their instructions to install with Appimage or install from your distro.

I was told it depends on your distribution too.
Link? SInce KDevelop is made by KDE, it may be better suited to a KDE system. But that is the Desktop, not the distro.

Cheers
 

JasKinasis

Well-Known Member
Which Linux distro/version are you using?
And what error messages/visual feedback are you getting from the kdevelop IDE when you try to build a project?

The more specific detail you can include about the problem and it's symptoms - the easier it will be to help you.
 
I will look up the Linux distro and report back. As far as the kdevelop, the build button is grayed out. So I can build, debug, or do anything except type code in. Thanks for everyone's help btw.
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
Do you think I should remove what I installed and use that link @atanere
No, not really. Just showing that this program should be available to you in your software repositories. If you compiled it from source without errors (about dependencies) then you should be okay... but the Appimage was definitely the first suggested method to install it, software repositories second, and building from source was the last suggestion.

If you can't build, debug, or compile.... what code have you typed in there???

If kdevelop is not working properly with good code to run on, then yes, maybe reinstalling it from a more preferred method would be a good idea.
 

JasKinasis

Well-Known Member
If the build button was greyed out -it means you're probably missing gcc and/or some of kdevelops other external dependencies.

Kdevelop is available in the Ubuntu repositories - installing it from the repos should automatically pull in all of its dependencies. So if you used some other method - try installing the version in the repo.

If you installed from the repos and the problem persists - it could be that you haven't configured/set up your project properly. I haven't used kdevelop in a good few years. The last time I used it - its interface had changed quite significantly and the workflow was a little different.
 
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If the build button was greyed out -it means you're probably missing gcc and/or some of kdevelops other external dependencies.

Kdevelop is available in the Ubuntu repositories - installing it from the repos should automatically pull in all of its dependencies. So if you used some other method - try installing the version in the repo.

If you installed from the repos and the problem persists - it could be that you haven't configured/set up your project properly. I haven't used kdevelop in a good few years. The last time I used it - its interface had changed quite significantly and the workflow was a little different.
@JasKinasis,
I fairly new to linux, how would I go about making sure its installed from the respositories?
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
If you have Synaptic Package Manager installed open it and enter kdevelop in the search box and if it was installed from the repos it will show it.
 

JasKinasis

Well-Known Member
The quickest way is to open a terminal and use the command apt search kdevelop --names-only

If that says installed after the name of the package - then you've installed the version from the repos.

Or you could use synaptic as per poorguys answer

And if it isn't installed - either install it using synaptic, or use apt in the terminal: sudo apt install kdevelop
 
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JasKinasis

Well-Known Member
BTW - If you installed the appimage, then all of the dependencies should be built into the appimage. So your problem might not be related to missing dependencies.

I'm beginning to think that this might be down to your usage of the IDE. It's not the sort of thing you just start writing code in and then hit compile. You have to set up a new project for each program that you create.

Here's a slightly old, but hopefully still relevant "hello world" tutorial for kdevelop:
 
The quickest way is to open a terminal and use the command apt search kdevelop --names-only

If that says installed after the name of the package - then you've installed the version from the repos.

Or you could use synaptic as per poorguys answer

And if it isn't installed - either install it using synaptic, or use apt in the terminal: sudo apt install kdevelop
4223
 
BTW - If you installed the appimage, then all of the dependencies should be built into the appimage. So your problem might not be related to missing dependencies.

I'm beginning to think that this might be down to your usage of the IDE. It's not the sort of thing you just start writing code in and then hit compile. You have to set up a new project for each program that you create.

Here's a slightly old, but hopefully still relevant "hello world" tutorial for kdevelop:
Perhaps, you're right. I can't even figure out the visual studio 2019 on windows 10. lol. I use code blocks. I can't figure out that on linux either. I have tired. The main.cpp file won't pull up.
 

JasKinasis

Well-Known Member
Perhaps, you're right. I can't even figure out the visual studio 2019 on windows 10. lol. I use code blocks. I can't figure out that on linux either. I have tired. The main.cpp file won't pull up.
Well, it sounds like we've probably found the root cause of your problem.

An IDE is great tool - but as with any tool - you still need to know how to use it before you can become productive with it. I've already posted a link to a hello-world video tutorial for kdevelop. You should be able to find similar tutorials online for pretty much every other IDE available.

Generally speaking, when starting to write a new program/application in any IDE - you need to go to file->new->project and then go through the IDE's project-wizard to set up some initial options for it - depending on the type of application you want to build.

Then the IDE will generate the skeleton of an application for you and set up the linker/compiler options used to build the application - based on the settings you chose in the project-wizard.

Once the project wizard has done its thing, you can edit the generated files to create your program/application and then build, run and debug it.

You can also start with an blank/empty project - but this means that you would have to manually set up your project and the compiler/linker options and add files yourself. But you don't really want to be doing that until you have a better idea of what you are doing. I imagine you'll be starting out with simple terminal based programs. So your chosen IDE's terminal application template will probably serve you best at first.

I hope this helps a little.
 
Well, it sounds like we've probably found the root cause of your problem.

An IDE is great tool - but as with any tool - you still need to know how to use it before you can become productive with it. I've already posted a link to a hello-world video tutorial for kdevelop. You should be able to find similar tutorials online for pretty much every other IDE available.

Generally speaking, when starting to write a new program/application in any IDE - you need to go to file->new->project and then go through the IDE's project-wizard to set up some initial options for it - depending on the type of application you want to build.

Then the IDE will generate the skeleton of an application for you and set up the linker/compiler options used to build the application - based on the settings you chose in the project-wizard.

Once the project wizard has done its thing, you can edit the generated files to create your program/application and then build, run and debug it.

You can also start with an blank/empty project - but this means that you would have to manually set up your project and the compiler/linker options and add files yourself. But you don't really want to be doing that until you have a better idea of what you are doing. I imagine you'll be starting out with simple terminal based programs. So your chosen IDE's terminal application template will probably serve you best at first.

I hope this helps a little.
Yeah, I'm about to go check it out. I'm slammed with homework, so I will get on it. I love this linux forum. Everyone is so helpful.
 

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