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KDE Vs Gnome

kc1di

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The person that wrote the article doesn't get the Gnome workflow, the Gnome workflow is somewhere between that of desktop environment and a tiling window manager where you can choose to use it keyboard oriented or mouse oriented. You can use extensions to give it a more classic desktop workflow but the extensions break every major update, I recently found a good comparison by Linux Youtuber, that the same happens with a major update with DWM that patches break and need to get fixed as well.


The writer also complains about Gnome taking up 2,5G of ram, sounds more like this person is a minimalist. We are living in 2024 where pre-built pc's for every day work have 16G ram and pre-built gaming pc's have 32G ram.

I'm writing this because I use Gnome and I have used KDE Plasma in recent years. I just think for someone writing an article comparing two desktop environments they should have written a more object view rather than just sharing their views.

P.S My view isn't objective either but at least I'm honest about it :)
 
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This is just two of the choices of a DE, we as Linux users are spoilt for choice. As with a distribution, it's a personal choice which you want to use. They all work. They are all stable, so no arguments as far as I am concerned.
 
I have no intention of starting a DE war here (I hate these wars anyway) but I will say my opinion as detailed as possible. It's up to the reader to decide for themselves. Remember that this is my personal opinion and it will never change, I'm not obligating anyone to agree with me.

My favorite desktop which I'm using 9th year in a row is Cinnamon (which is a fork of Gnome 2, I think) but I use separate apps from KDE and Gnome. Cuz from both DEs some apps are very good and cool (like kolourpaint, gedit, pluma, whereas these two whole desktops are simply not my thing. But ever since GTK4 came officially and Gnome started migrating everything to GTK4, I had to start downgrading and freezing those apps at GTK3 versions because GTK4 is horrible - nothing to do with GTK3, no dark themes either, thus they all appear white. Even the CSS files of GTK4 are too different from GTK3, so I can't even begin to understand which file(s) I should edit in order to have the GTK3 look in GTK4.
The Linux Mint team (the developers of Cinnamon) started gnomifying Cinnamon slowly but surely (that process began with removing support for metacity in Cinnamon 5.4.0, so no more flipping and V-Sync in native linux games (no flipping means V-Sync doesn't work and quite often you can see what appears to be an FPS drop, despite that mangohud may still show stable 60 FPS). I have reported that problem twice but they seem to be not inclined to fix it, so it's a matter of time before I say "Farewell, Cinnamon). And by removing metacity they also removed the option to choose a custom window decoration, so now (just like on Gnome) all of your windows have the same window decoration (or title bar, if you will) and you can't change it in any way.
I'll keep using Cinnamon 6.x for as long as I can. When the gnomification changes become too many, I'll most probably move to Plasma 6 because that's the only desktop as close as possible to Cinnamon and my needs, despite that it has thousands of options that I don't need and never will and some are even ridiculous.
The rest of the desktops are just way too cut off regarding functions and customization options. For instance, on MATE you can't make the panel to be 100% transparent or semi-transparent because when you do that, all the apps that were added to the panel disappear along with the panel's color and if you make it 100% transparent, the same thing happens with the apps icons added to the panel. :D
The last time I tried XFCE it was still using GTK2 which didn't support transparency, so my only chose for the panel and a few other things was a solid color because GTK2 supported only HEX code colors. Luxuries like RGBA format was just a dream in XFCE. IDK if they have migrated to GTK3 yet.
LXQt, LXDE are even worse than MATE & XFCE, I won't even start listing the problems with the other less popular desktops, so that leaves me with one choice only - migrating to Plasma 6 some day, hopefully not too soon.
 
I have reported that problem twice but they seem to be not inclined to fix it, so it's a matter of time before I say "Farewell, Cinnamon). And by removing metacity they also removed the option to choose a custom window decoration, so now (just like on Gnome) all of your windows have the same window decoration (or title bar, if you will) and you can't change it in any way.
I'll keep using Cinnamon 6.x for as long as I can. When the gnomification changes become too many, I'll most probably move to Plasma 6 because that's the only desktop as close as possible to Cinnamon and my needs, despite that it has thousands of options that I don't need and never will and some are even ridiculous.
You can always switch to MATE which is also a fork of Gnome2 as well :)
 
My favorite desktop which I'm using 9th year in a row is Cinnamon (which is a fork of Gnome 2, I think)
Actually it was a fork form gnome 3. But thank you for your thoughts Cinnamon is my 2nd favorite DE. Glad it works well for you.
 
You can always switch to MATE which is also a fork of Gnome2 as well :)
Didn't you read what I wrote about MATE and why it's not an option?

on MATE you can't make the panel to be 100% transparent or semi-transparent because when you do that, all the apps that were added to the panel disappear along with the panel's color and if you make it 100% transparent, the same thing happens with the apps icons added to the panel.
 
Didn't you read what I wrote about MATE and why it's not an option?
Yes I did, but missed that part. I see it now though. Sorry to say but your huge amount of texts are hard to read with no spacing between the paragraphs making it look like one huge chunk of text making it unbearable to read through without losing concentration and missing something. But yes then KDE Plasma would be the next best option for you.
 
no spacing between the paragraphs
I hate spacing between paragraphs. That's a feature typical for IPB and the stupid JS which puts spacing even between different lines.
Plus, nobody has ever (in the past 30 years) complained about me avoiding spacing between paragraphs, you're the first. :p
 
I hate spacing between paragraphs. That's a feature typical for IPB and the stupid JS which puts spacing even between different lines.
I dislike spacing between lines, I only like spacing between paragraphs to make it more readable and it's easier to keep track of where you were if you lose concentration for a second and then need to find where you left of.

Plus, nobody has ever (in the past 30 years) complained about me avoiding spacing between paragraphs, you're the first. :p
And more people dislike this.


@kc1di Sorry for going off topic, but I just needed to say this, going to give an example.
 
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I dislike spacing between lines, I only like spacing between paragraphs to make it more readable and it's easier to keep track of where you were if you lose concentration for a second and then need to find where you left of.
Let me give you an example. This is how you would do it:

The history of the Linux kernel is a tale of innovation, collaboration, and the power of open-source development. It begins in 1991 when Linus Torvalds, a 21-year-old computer science student at the University of Helsinki, started a project that would revolutionize the computing world. Frustrated with the limitations of MINIX, a small UNIX-like system, Torvalds decided to create his own operating system kernel. He announced his project in a now-famous post on the comp.os.minix newsgroup, seeking feedback and contributions from other programmers.
Torvalds released the first version of the Linux kernel, version 0.01, in September 1991. It was a simple, monolithic kernel written in C, designed to be compatible with the Intel 80386 microprocessor. The early versions of the Linux kernel were basic, with limited functionality and hardware support, but they laid the groundwork for what would become a robust and flexible operating system. The Linux kernel quickly gained traction among hobbyists and developers, who began contributing code, improving its features, and expanding its hardware compatibility.
The development of the Linux kernel was fueled by the principles of open-source software. Under the GNU General Public License (GPL), the kernel's source code was freely available for anyone to use, modify, and distribute. This openness attracted a global community of developers, who collaborated through mailing lists, forums, and version control systems. Key contributions came from various individuals and organizations, including Richard Stallman and the Free Software Foundation, which provided essential tools and libraries through the GNU Project.
Throughout the 1990s and 2000s, the Linux kernel matured rapidly. Major companies like IBM, Intel, and Red Hat began to see the potential of Linux, contributing resources and code to the project. This corporate involvement helped accelerate the development of the kernel, leading to significant improvements in performance, scalability, and security. Linux became the kernel of choice for many different operating systems, known as distributions, each tailored for specific use cases, from desktop computing to embedded systems and supercomputers.
The Linux kernel's adaptability and continuous evolution have made it the backbone of modern computing. It powers the vast majority of web servers, cloud infrastructure, mobile devices (through Android), and even embedded systems in cars and appliances. Linus Torvalds continues to oversee the development of the kernel, guiding its progress with the help of a decentralized network of maintainers and contributors. The Linux kernel's success is a testament to the strength of collaborative, open-source development, proving that a community-driven approach can produce software that rivals and often surpasses proprietary alternatives.
In summary, the history of the Linux kernel is a remarkable journey from a modest personal project to a global phenomenon. It exemplifies how collective effort, shared knowledge, and a commitment to openness can create a transformative technology, changing the landscape of computing and empowering users and developers worldwide.

That's just garbage and a mess to read, this how it's easier to read.

The history of the Linux kernel is a tale of innovation, collaboration, and the power of open-source development. It begins in 1991 when Linus Torvalds, a 21-year-old computer science student at the University of Helsinki, started a project that would revolutionize the computing world. Frustrated with the limitations of MINIX, a small UNIX-like system, Torvalds decided to create his own operating system kernel. He announced his project in a now-famous post on the comp.os.minix newsgroup, seeking feedback and contributions from other programmers.

Torvalds released the first version of the Linux kernel, version 0.01, in September 1991. It was a simple, monolithic kernel written in C, designed to be compatible with the Intel 80386 microprocessor. The early versions of the Linux kernel were basic, with limited functionality and hardware support, but they laid the groundwork for what would become a robust and flexible operating system. The Linux kernel quickly gained traction among hobbyists and developers, who began contributing code, improving its features, and expanding its hardware compatibility.

The development of the Linux kernel was fueled by the principles of open-source software. Under the GNU General Public License (GPL), the kernel's source code was freely available for anyone to use, modify, and distribute. This openness attracted a global community of developers, who collaborated through mailing lists, forums, and version control systems. Key contributions came from various individuals and organizations, including Richard Stallman and the Free Software Foundation, which provided essential tools and libraries through the GNU Project.

Throughout the 1990s and 2000s, the Linux kernel matured rapidly. Major companies like IBM, Intel, and Red Hat began to see the potential of Linux, contributing resources and code to the project. This corporate involvement helped accelerate the development of the kernel, leading to significant improvements in performance, scalability, and security. Linux became the kernel of choice for many different operating systems, known as distributions, each tailored for specific use cases, from desktop computing to embedded systems and supercomputers.

The Linux kernel's adaptability and continuous evolution have made it the backbone of modern computing. It powers the vast majority of web servers, cloud infrastructure, mobile devices (through Android), and even embedded systems in cars and appliances. Linus Torvalds continues to oversee the development of the kernel, guiding its progress with the help of a decentralized network of maintainers and contributors. The Linux kernel's success is a testament to the strength of collaborative, open-source development, proving that a community-driven approach can produce software that rivals and often surpasses proprietary alternatives.

In summary, the history of the Linux kernel is a remarkable journey from a modest personal project to a global phenomenon. It exemplifies how collective effort, shared knowledge, and a commitment to openness can create a transformative technology, changing the landscape of computing and empowering users and developers worldwide.

It's easier to read that way, I never liked English class but I remember that is how they teach you to write in English class, even my own language so I can't imagine it would be any different for other languages. I'm sure there are more here on the forum who would agree with me on this.
 
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Gnome-Flashback is always an option if you prefer the win9x-w2k-Gnome 2 way of doing things uses the newer gtk stuff. MATE still needs to catch up a bit in that regard I understand. Lighter than KDE as well as default GNOME.

As pointed out earlier we as Linux users are just spoilt for choice.....
 
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I also do not wish to start, or get involved in any flame wars. I honestly don’t care what desktop environment other people use. We’re all different. Use whatever you like.

However, at the risk of sounding like a broken record, I’m going to add my personal perspective:
Since getting hooked on using tiling WMs many years ago, the traditional desktop just feels so unnecessarily heavyweight, clunky and awkward to me. I personally dislike using Gnome, KDE and all of the other typical point and click desktops/WMs.

Out of all of the tiling WM’s, I prefer the bare bones minimalism of dwm.
It’s supremely lightweight. Controlled purely by keyboard shortcuts. Can be modified/extended quite easily (with a little knowledge of C). I build and install mine from source via github. I have my own git repository which contains my personal customisations (mostly additional keybinds for quickly launching my most used applications, a personalised colour scheme and a few minor functional tweaks).

Dwm simply manages the application windows for whatever programs I start and it stays the hell out of my way, so I can be productive. No unnecessary GUI menus or launchers. No clumsily faffing around with the mouse, dragging and resizing application windows around the screen. No menu-bars/status bars getting in the way.
No unnecessary services or applets running on startup, wasting CPU time and RAM.
It just makes for a leaner, more efficient system.

Also, "tags" are dwm’s truly killer feature. They’re kinda like a simpler, more lightweight alternative to virtual desktops.
You have 9 tags numbered 1-9.
You can assign different applications to one or more different tags. You can simultaneously view one or more tags at a time.
There’s also a 10th tag numbered 0 which shows all applications in all tags.
If you have multiple monitors, you’ll have 10 independent tags in each monitor.
So 2 monitors will give you 20 tags.

And again, it’s all controlled by the keyboard, so you can switch to any monitor, view any of its tags and can start different applications and assign them to different tags in that monitor.
Tags allow you to set up your workspace however you want.

Dwm might not be flashy or modern looking and might not be everybody’s cup of tea. But it’s fast, lightweight and makes me extremely happy!

The only thing that concerns me is that dwm only runs on X11, which is gradually being phased out, in favor of Wayland.
There are a few dwm-like WMs available for Wayland. But I don’t want to switch away from DWM/X11 until I have absolutely no other choice!
 
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