iso file

Resakra

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Hi Folk!

I made an iso file of ubuntu at a usb to use it for "try ubuntu" mode or to install on VM, just in case. Now after a week this iso image splited to many file and subfolder, not a unique iso file anymore, so I m not able to use it for my Virtualbox . This happens everytime I download ubuntu and save it as an iso image (using disks to make an image file in ubuntu20). What could be the problem? Thanks in advance
 


wizardfromoz

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G'day @Resakra :)

Are you able to open your File Manager, and show us what you describe above and post a screenshot here? When you are attaching the file, choose Fullsize over Thumbnail, then we can view it more easily. If posting multiple images, just place a line or two between each.

If you are looking to install in a VM, you just need the .iso file, not an image.

Cheers

Wiz
 

Vrai

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This happens everytime I download ubuntu and save it as an iso image (using disks to make an image file in ubuntu20). What could be the problem?
The .iso needs to be treated as one large file. After downloading it do not 'extract' it.
Use an application to make a bootable USB or DVD with the file.
Linux and Windows have applications available for doing just this.
I do not remember exactly what platform you are using (Windows, Linux, Mac, BSD, Unix, Sparc, etc. :)) but if you post it here I am sure someone will recommend a good application.
There are also many good tutorials on various web sites describing the making of a 'bootable' USB.
 

Resakra

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I have used "startups disks" at ubuntu . Isn't it recommended?
Thereafter I connect the usb to the computer and it will be two different folders to show up on the panel : writable and (in this case) Linux mint, as the attached file.

Rufus is the one I have been using to get an iso file in windows/linux

scrshot.jpg
 

Condobloke

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The idea of an iso file....is toi use rufus (or similar) to make a BOOTABLE usb.
THEN....shut the pc down....insert the usb, press esc or F11 or whatever it is on your pc to get to the boot menu.......and change the boot order, so the pc boots to the usb.....NOT to the hard drive.
 
Last edited:

Vrai

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I have used "startups disks" at ubuntu . Isn't it recommended?
Thereafter I connect the usb to the computer and it will be two different folders to show up on the panel : writable and (in this case) Linux mint, as the attached file.

Rufus is the one I have been using to get an iso file in windows/linux

View attachment 7331
That screenshot looks like you are looking at the files on the disk with the 'file explorer'.
If you have 'burned' (copied) the .iso to a disk with an application such as "Rufus" then in order to 'run' the software you would boot the pc from the disk you burned the .iso to.

Insert the USB or DVD into the computer and then restart the machine. You may need to select the Boot device or adjust your BIOS to boot from either USB or DVD.
 

jglen490

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An .iso file is an archive that contains everything needed to make the bootable medium. Like this:
1601000960947.png

After the .iso is burned to some device (like a thumb drive) the files are listed separately. Like this:
1601001126299.png

The same thing, but different form. So what you have is normal. Insert the device into a USB connector, reboot such that the USB device boots first, and the installer will take over and start the Live session with options including being able to install the distro using the files.
 

Resakra

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Sorry for late reply. The account has been locked due to wrong password attempts.
Then that was a typo to suppose that it should be still a one an only one file after rufus/start up disks done the job. I have actually been booting from usb, hundred times without noticing that there are still hundreds files there.
Thanks!
 

jglen490

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O.K.

The USB device with files burned to it is for the express purpose of installation. Yes, you can run the installer as a "Live" test, but in reality the "live" version is a bit different than the installed version. A "live" image with persistence can be used for a variety of things as if it were an actual installation, but if a user is looking for something more permanent, then that user really should install it.
 


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