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Is ExpertBook B2502C with Linux good for DevOps?

HumbleFinch

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Hi! It's me again. Going to order ExpertBook B2502C and install Linux (Ubuntu, Mint or Debian) on them. The model is ASUS ExpertBook B2502CVA-KJ0622 Laptop 15.6", Intel Core i7-1360P, RAM 32 GB, SSD 512 GB, Intel Iris Xe Graphics, No OS, (90NX06F1-M00V60), Black.
How is it working with Linux? I couldn't find relevant probes on www.linux-hardware.org so I don't exactly know. What about DevOps and programming at whole? Are CPU and cooling system powerful enough?
 


What about DevOps and programming at whole?
What kind of software will you program and how big your project will be? which programming language?

If it's about compiling as opposed to scripting it's a huge difference, also developing regular software vs game dev is also huge difference to tell what kind of computer you need.

Maybe somebody can give you better suggestions but as I already told you, a laptop without discrete GPU is off the table if you ask me.
 
ExpertBook B2502CVA-KJ0622 Laptop 15.6", Intel Core i7-1360P,
I would be inclined to start with MX-Linux AHS as it contains more newer drivers than the normal offerings and run it from a live pen-drive to test everything works
 
What kind of software will you program and how big your project will be? which programming language?

If it's about compiling as opposed to scripting it's a huge difference, also developing regular software vs game dev is also huge difference to tell what kind of computer you need.

Maybe somebody can give you better suggestions but as I already told you, a laptop without discrete GPU is off the table if you ask me.
I suppose that I wouldn't compile my code, IDEs (VSCode or IntelliJ) and web browser would consume resources. Programming languages are probably Python, Go or Java/Kotlin.
 
I suppose that I wouldn't compile my code, IDEs (VSCode or IntelliJ) and web browser would consume resources. Programming languages are probably Python, Go or Java/Kotlin.
For this you don't need super machine.
If I'm buying a laptop this are the minimum specs I would look for:

Intel i5
16GB RAM (DDR5)
Discrete GPU 4GB (GDDR5)
512 GB SSD

Everything else is less important.
In any case I would avoid HP and Dell brands.

My favorite brand is Toshiba because was using it before however Toshiba's are slightly more expensive.
 
What about hardware? Is it sufficient
in many ways more than sufficient, the problem with the latest cutting edge kit is, it can take up to 9 months for the boys and girls to back engineer and test drivers before they are released
 
That laptop I've shown has no discrete GPU, integrated only. Is it bad?
Like @Brickwizard said, it depends on what you'll be doing.

To play games you want discrete GPU with 4GB of GDDR memory at least.
I would personally not buy a laptop with integrated GPU, you already had one and have returned it, why doing same mistake again.
 
In any case I would avoid HP and Dell brands.
Um....why??

I've had 4 or 5 Dells over the years, and they've never been anything less than super-friendly where Linux is concerned. I've been able to get everything up-and-running - piece of cake! - where other brands have been, shall we say, finicky.....and quite "fussy". My current 2008 Latitude D630 is a case in point; T7250 Core2Duo, 4 GB DDR2, 128GB SATA SSD and an Nvidia mobile Quadro NVS-135m. Runs a pair of Puppies very sweetly indeed.

And OK; HP have had some bad press from the Linux community in recent years, but by and large their gear is also Linux-friendly. My desktop rig - an HP Pavilion mid-tower; Pentium Gold G5400, 32GB DDR4, 5+ TB of internal storage and a "cooking" Nvidia GT 710 GPU (2 GB DDR5) is a brilliant Puppy "kennels" (currently a dozen of the little darlings.....and counting!).

I have to assume you've had "issues" with both these brands in the past?
confused-small.gif



Mike. o_O
 
I have to assume you've had "issues" with both these brands in the past?
Yes I did, that's exactly why I've put a cross on them.

My first laptop was HP, and it didn't last long, GPU burned out relatively quickly.
And Dell, I didn't have it but was trying to install Linux on it for someone else, BIOS interface was so horrible to navigate and a ton of settings not present that I needed.

This was long time ago and might no longer be the case but I'm a kind of costumer who never returns back if things don't work as I want them.

There are hardware and laptop brands which I value and there are those which I don't.
 
In any case I would avoid HP and Dell brands.
just the two brands I run,
my laptop is a dell, never any problems installing any distribution [apart from the usual BCM driver needed installing]
My desktop is an HP Prodesk SFF again no major problems with Linux, except No way could i get the onboard sound to work, [wind 10 which was installed also didn't work]so I used a USB stereo adaptor until i swapped to LMDE and everything now works,

I have been installing Linux on machines for over 20 years, so. IMO the best and worse
top

1]Dell
2]Lenovo
3 HP,
4]Toshiba

bottom

Asus
Media star [MSE]
Acer
all of these 3 have given me hair pulling episodes

I try and avoid at all cost
all Chromebooks
Any android device.
 
Last edited:
I try and avoid at all cost
all Chromebooks
Any android device.

I agree with you on the Chromebooks.
But other than that, I am not a brand name guy.

I've never had any trouble with installing Linux on anything.
My two main daily drivers are both "home-built" newegg specials.
I'm typing this on one of those right now.

.. android devices. Well, it's definitely not for beginners or the timid.
But it can be fun if you have the right temperament for it.
 
Um....why??

I've had 4 or 5 Dells over the years, and they've never been anything less than super-friendly where Linux is concerned. I've been able to get everything up-and-running - piece of cake! - where other brands have been, shall we say, finicky.....and quite "fussy". My current 2008 Latitude D630 is a case in point; T7250 Core2Duo, 4 GB DDR2, 128GB SATA SSD and an Nvidia mobile Quadro NVS-135m. Runs a pair of Puppies very sweetly indeed.

And OK; HP have had some bad press from the Linux community in recent years, but by and large their gear is also Linux-friendly. My desktop rig - an HP Pavilion mid-tower; Pentium Gold G5400, 32GB DDR4, 5+ TB of internal storage and a "cooking" Nvidia GT 710 GPU (2 GB DDR5) is a brilliant Puppy "kennels" (currently a dozen of the little darlings.....and counting!).

I have to assume you've had "issues" with both these brands in the past?
confused-small.gif



Mike. o_O

My two cents, and that may be all it's worth:

I seem to recall a time when Dell had a reputation (deserved or otherwise) for poor quality in both hardware and service for their "consumer grade" products while remaining golden for their "business grade" products.

I worked in IT for a small company where the owner insisted upon Dell systems (of the "business grade", of course) and I experienced that end of things and can vouch for the quality and service from that standpoint. The only time I ever bought Dell products for my own personal use, what I actually bought were some low-end servers on closeout. Because I bought a pair of servers, Dell classified me as a "business" customer and I reaped the benefits of that immediately. One of those servers was defective on arrival so I called their support line late in the evening of the day they arrived. After the usual trouble shooting steps they offered to dispatch a repair guy that very night to straighten it out by 1:00 AM. I was impressed, but asked them to wait until 1:00 PM, which they did. The repair guy came prepared to replace basically everything but the case. I'm still using those two servers - and that was in 2008! (I'm actually getting ready to retire at least one of them, primarily because newer/faster systems (ones that have more than 4 GB of RAM!) have come along.)

No end of people complaining about Dell's consumer laptops... and their service from around that time.

I've had a goodly few hand-me-down Dell laptops but usually by the time I got them they were in pretty bad condition so I can't much vouch for the quality of those but one thing I will note, for linux use, is that they seemed always to have some wifi device that nobody ever heard of so good luck finding a driver. Again this was a while back so the information may be a bit "stale".

Lately, almost all of my laptops have been hand-me-down HPs, invariably with some version of MS Windows in an unsalvageable wreck, but the hardware has taken linux and run without problems (including the wifi devices).
 

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