Installing Packages on a Dual Drive System

kay-dee

Member
Credits
8
My new, dual drive system on the Clevo (Zorin/Gnome), seems to have been successful and I am very pleased. But being this is all new to me, I wonder about installing Packages.

Most of what I need is in the Repository. I figure the computer is smart enough to know where to install something like VCL Media Player or a different browser. I assume all this goes to the SSD drive.

But what about something like Extreme Download Manager which is NOT in the Repository. When I download the .tar file, I am used to switching to Downloads (cd Downloads) in the terminal and entering the command from the XDM Read Me file. Will this same procedure put XDM onto the SSD drive? Or, is that where it is supposed to go?

What do I need to do to install the package on the SSD? Or does it matter?

As always, thank you…

Katie
 


Vrai

Well-Known Member
Credits
2,482
My new, dual drive system on the Clevo (Zorin/Gnome), seems to have been successful and I am very pleased. But being this is all new to me, I wonder about installing Packages.

Most of what I need is in the Repository. I figure the computer is smart enough to know where to install something like VCL Media Player or a different browser. I assume all this goes to the SSD drive.

But what about something like Extreme Download Manager which is NOT in the Repository. When I download the .tar file, I am used to switching to Downloads (cd Downloads) in the terminal and entering the command from the XDM Read Me file. Will this same procedure put XDM onto the SSD drive? Or, is that where it is supposed to go?

What do I need to do to install the package on the SSD? Or does it matter?

As always, thank you…

Katie
I'm not familiar with that 'Extreme Download Manager " package and I guess I missed a few of your posts about how you have that machine set up (I read most of them!) - but - if my memory serves, generally you would create a directory in your "Home" directory for the package and un-tar and un-zip it there and run the installer. If installing from the terminal open the terminal in the same directory as the package (or cd to it) and run the commands from there. I 'think' the install script will search for and find the proper directories to place all the bits and pieces (provided they are mounted).
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
4,926
Hi all, I've just got back on the internet after 10 days' outage.

I'll play catch up over the next couple of days and get back here asap.

Cheers

Wiz
 

kay-dee

Member
Credits
8
Thanks @Vrai , that sounds simple enough. I'm probably making this more difficult than it is but right now, I'm taking baby steps.
Katie
 

kay-dee

Member
Credits
8
Wiz... ten days without power? I thought that only happened in the DR. Nice thing about living on the boat; I make my own! Doesn't help with wifi, though.
Good to have you back,
Katie
 

JasKinasis

Well-Known Member
Credits
2,502
My new, dual drive system on the Clevo (Zorin/Gnome), seems to have been successful and I am very pleased. But being this is all new to me, I wonder about installing Packages.

Most of what I need is in the Repository. I figure the computer is smart enough to know where to install something like VCL Media Player or a different browser. I assume all this goes to the SSD drive.

But what about something like Extreme Download Manager which is NOT in the Repository. When I download the .tar file, I am used to switching to Downloads (cd Downloads) in the terminal and entering the command from the XDM Read Me file. Will this same procedure put XDM onto the SSD drive? Or, is that where it is supposed to go?

What do I need to do to install the package on the SSD? Or does it matter?

As always, thank you…

Katie
Installing XDM from the tar file using the instructions that come with it should put it somewhere appropriate for your system. You shouldn’t need to worry about it too much!
 
Last edited:

JasKinasis

Well-Known Member
Credits
2,502
Hi all, I've just got back on the internet after 10 days' outage.

I'll play catch up over the next couple of days and get back here asap.

Cheers

Wiz
Switching service providers?
Or was your connection taken out by the bush-fires that are currently ravaging parts of Oz?

I have an uncle and cousins living in NSW who are living fairly close to one of the big fires.

I hope everything is OK!
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
4,926
Hey thanks, Jas, appreciated :) - we were evacuated 6th September with the fires, for 18 hours, but came home to the house in one piece - phew!

The fires have caused much problems ever since. I feel for your family. The biggest one, north of Sydney is ... larger than Sydney, and too big to control. They just have to wait for hopefully January and February rains.

Ditching ISP as soon as my surfing reveals a better one.

Back on business to this Thread after a coffee or two with my girl. :D

Wiz
 

kay-dee

Member
Credits
8
Thanks, @JasKinasis. That's really good to know. I'm still pussyfooting around with this dual drive system but so far, I love it and in a big leap of faith, I've started transferring files. Suppose it'll take a few weeks for me to be totally comfortable, but I've come to expect that.
Best,
Katie
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
4,926
2020 here in Oz, and it's good to be back online and sharing Linux with you all :D

Just internet outage Katie, not the power. Phew.

With your XDM tar, which you may have downloaded through SourceForge, you can quite often view the contents of a tar at the website before even downloading. I am in Zorin now.

Most every Linux distro has an archive manager - in some cases Engrampa, in others, Fie Roller.

In Debian-based distros (includes Zorin) apt-cache policy can tell the story.



SCREENSHOT 1 - ZORIN USES FILE ROLLER

So it's File Roller for Zorin, but I could also install Engrampa from the Repos.

Note the hyphen with file-roller, which you might not be expected to know or guess.

BUT (Wizard's but is never far behind him) we can type in part of the command and press Tab and it will autocomplete or show choices to type further.

Code:
[email protected]:~$ apt-cache policy file
file              filepp            filetea           filezilla-common
file-kanji        file-roller       filetraq         
filelight         fileschanged      filezilla         
[email protected]:~$ apt-cache policy file
At the SourceForge website page I can click the tar to download, and File Roller will open with choices to open the file with File Roller to view, or to download (by default, this will be to

/home/user/Downloads

... along the lines Vrai suggested).

Again, following on from what Jas said -

File Roller reveals the content as a script install.sh, and a text file readme.txt.

The latter is what I am interested in so it reveals

Installation instruction

1. Open terminal
2. Switch to the directory where you have extracted tar compressed file, there should be a file named install.sh
3. Execute the file as root.
a. In Ubuntu/Mint/Elementary OS or other Debian based Linux, use: sudo ./install.sh
b. In Fedora,Arch,Gentoo,Mageia or where sudo is not configured, use: su -c ./install.sh
4. If installation is successfull, you can start xdm from Start Menu or by typing xdman interminal as non root user
5. To uninstall run /opt/xdman/uninstall.sh as root
So I've downloaded the tar, it's in Downloads, but I prefer to place "introduced" apps in /opt so I follow the rest of the process as seen in the Spoiler below (click to open, click to close).

Here I am using instructions from

https://tecadmin.net/extract-archive-file-linux/

which I find a good spot to bookmark as it covers the main formats for tars.

[email protected]:~$ sudo mv ~/Downloads/xdm-2018-x64.tar.xz /opt
[sudo] password for chris:
[email protected]:~$ cd /opt
[email protected]:/opt$ ls
xdm-2018-x64.tar.xz
[email protected]:/opt$ sudo tar -xJf xdm-2018-x64.tar.xz
[email protected]:/opt$ ls
install.sh readme.txt xdm-2018-x64.tar.xz
[email protected]:/opt$ cat readme.txt
Installation instruction

1. Open terminal
2. Switch to the directory where you have extracted tar compressed file, there should be a file named install.sh
3. Execute the file as root.
a. In Ubuntu/Mint/Elementary OS or other Debian based Linux, use: sudo ./install.sh
b. In Fedora,Arch,Gentoo,Mageia or where sudo is not configured, use: su -c ./install.sh
4. If installation is successfull, you can start xdm from Start Menu or by typing xdman interminal as non root user
5. To uninstall run /opt/xdman/uninstall.sh as root
[email protected]:/opt$ sudo ./install.sh
Initializing setup...
Extracting files...
Unpacking /opt/xdman/jre/lib/charsets.pack...
Unpacking /opt/xdman/jre/lib/ext/cldrdata.pack...
Unpacking /opt/xdman/jre/lib/ext/nashorn.pack...
Unpacking /opt/xdman/jre/lib/rt.pack...
Finishing installation...
Xtreme Download Manager installed successfully
You can start XDM from start menu, or type xdman in terminal as non root user

As it says, you can run XDM from Terminal with

Code:
xdman
If you do, when you exit the app, there will still be a Terminal window open with output from the process "hanging" and you will need to use ^C (Ctrl-c) to close out of it.

Easier is to use the Menu, type in "xtreme" and launch from there, or right-click the menu entry and "Add to Favourites" to add it to your Panel.

See how you go, and I'll have a play with mine when I get time.

Cheers

Wiz

BTW note in the Readme file there are also uninstall instructions should you wish to remove. :)
 

kay-dee

Member
Credits
8
Thanx, Wiz...
New Years Day and the bars are all closed. I'm sitting on the sidewalk!
Have copied your post and will have a closer look later, on the boat. With the sun on the screen, I can't make out much.
Talk with you tomorrow,
Katie
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
4,926

kay-dee

Member
Credits
8
I like your BUT, Wiz. Oh-h, that doesn’t sound right! Anyway, a neat trick when using the Terminal.

And thanks for all your work. If memory serves, I think this is much the same procedure I used to install XDM in Mint on my single drive ThinkPad. I do remember having trouble downloading directly from SourceForge but pressing the big button on the XDM official site linked me back to SourceForge and this time things worked just fine. Don’t know why the difference.

In Mint, I extracted the tar file in Downloads then opened the Terminal and entered cd Downloads. Once in Downloads I just entered the command from the Read Me file. I integrated XDM with the browser I was using at the time and things worked perfectly after re-booting. Use Chrome for Chrome-based browsers. Firefox for the others.

So with the dual drive system, this puts XDM on the SSD? Is that where the Package (or any added Package), is supposed to run from? Is there a way to ensure the install goes to the correct drive?

I like XDM for the simplicity. You play a video and a big button appears in the lower right of your screen. Press it and select the video from the list. A window opens and you start the download. So easy. And it’s quick, too.

But if you are using a better Download Manager, well I’m always open to experimentation.

Glad to hear you only lost your internet. Power goes out here every time it rains. Sometimes we don’t get it back for days. But like I said, I make my own :)

Katie
 

kay-dee

Member
Credits
8
One other point regarding Extreme Download Manager. On the Lenovo ThinkPad/Zorin, when I use XDM, I keep getting a message in Home that Java has performed a Core Dump. I don’t believe Java is installed on Zorin, so maybe for XDM it should be installed. Not sure how that works! XDM works just fine the way it is, for me, and I just delete the Core Dump messages.

There are a couple of versions of Java available for install but people complain one of them is buggy. I hear so much negative stuff about Java, anyway, I really don’t want it on my machine.

Haven’t attempted an install of XDM on the Clevo yet so it remains to be seen if the Core Dump issue is machine related.

Katie
 

Vrai

Well-Known Member
Credits
2,482
One other point regarding Extreme Download Manager. On the Lenovo ThinkPad/Zorin, when I use XDM, I keep getting a message in Home that Java has performed a Core Dump. I don’t believe Java is installed on Zorin, so maybe for XDM it should be installed. Not sure how that works! XDM works just fine the way it is, for me, and I just delete the Core Dump messages.

There are a couple of versions of Java available for install but people complain one of them is buggy. I hear so much negative stuff about Java, anyway, I really don’t want it on my machine.

Haven’t attempted an install of XDM on the Clevo yet so it remains to be seen if the Core Dump issue is machine related.

Katie
I also think Java is a valid cause for concern. I I think it can be "O.K." if you employ "best security practices" and lock down you machine as best as you can.
 

kay-dee

Member
Credits
8
Thanx Vrai... still not sure I actually need Java. Like I said, XDM seems to run fine but I keep getting the Java Core Dump messages when I use it. So something isn't quite right. And the odd thing, I don't think Zorin includes Java as part of its install. So why am I getting the Core Dump messages at all?
Katie
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
4,926
Valid points and good responses from my friends, as I would expect :)

It's 5 past midday Sunday here in Oz, so it's beer o'clock, and I'll be back with a coldie and some relevant input in a few minutes.

Cheers

Wiz

I like your BUT, Wiz.
Works for me :p
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
4,926
Would have been back sooner but found a tiny scorpion headed for our laundry basket, so took him down the paddock to make friends elsewhere :)

You asked

So with the dual drive system, this puts XDM on the SSD? Is that where the Package (or any added Package), is supposed to run from? Is there a way to ensure the install goes to the correct drive?
So let's take a wee wander and find out.

I am running two (2) Zorin 15, one on my SSD, and one on my 4 TB external HDD (Western Digital). Running tests on a shared Home for another Thread.

So you'll recall I moved my downloaded tar to /opt and then extracted and installed?

That was the one on the external, /dev/sdc6 , and it has Home as /home/chris - a folder.

Here, I am writing from the SSD, and I have Zorin on /dev/sdb1 , and a separate Home partition on /dev/sda8 on my Hard drive.

Let's take a look at that through the File Manager, Nautilus, aka Files.

By default, Home will only show 8 folders, similar to those in Windows.

Ctrl-h can be used, or set to show hidden files and folders in Preferences - this reveals a different story, as shown.



SCREENSHOT 2 - ZORIN HOME, WIZARD'S HARD DRIVE

The formerly hidden files and folders are prefaced by a . - a dot.

Note there is a dot-java folder .java - but we can look at that later or elsewhere.

You view of things will be similar, not necessarily identical.

Beside my cursor is a folder .xdman for Extreme Download Manager.

I should say here, that, in this Zorin, I installed XDM the same way as you , that is not moving the tar to /opt manually.

When I initially installed XDM, the folder .xdman was not there.

With many apps, the first time they insert a presence in Home is when they are first launched or used. I launched XDM, hence the folder.

Same applies with .mozilla (Firefox), .thunderbird if you use Thunderbird, and so on.

If they do not get their own folder, they will likely be nested under .config - such is the case with Chromium Browser, and likely Chrome.

So all roads lead to, not Rome, but Home.

The rest of your question is answered as follows.

In Nautilus, travel down the left-hand pane and you will see

+ Other Locations

Click, then in the right pane, click Computer.

You will find there, the system folders for your root / partition, that is, your Linux install of Zorin.

Top of the window has a little magnifying glass for Search.

Click and type in xdman, it will start searching as you type.



WIZARD'S ROOT - SEARCH ON XDMAN - RESULTS

The above is a partial result on the search, as I have different presences for XDM on different Linux Distros, so I have confined the above to the current / partition.

Note the following:
  • Some or all system files are in /opt , which is where I set up the other XDM
  • There is xdman.jar 1.5 MB - .jar, and .cab you may know from Windows as being self-extracting files for an app.
  • There is also a presence in /usr/share/applications
What you may or may not recall with your download from sourceforge is that the tar, compressed, download was 33 MB in size, whereas the largest file shown above is 1.5 MB.

So there are other files elsewhere.

Overall, this is a long but extensive answer to your question.

The files are being stored and used where they need to be, with the system files being on your Zorin root partition (and thus the SSD drive) and the settings and configuration is being stored in your Home partition (and thus the HDD drive).

THat made me thirsty, I am off for a beer.

Cheers

Wiz
 


Members online


Top