Installing Linux Mint

barrycinti

New Member
Joined
May 5, 2024
Messages
12
Reaction score
5
Credits
154
I have tried installing Linux Mint via a USB stick. Towards the end of the install I get an error message there is insufficient disk space. If I shrink the C: partition to create an un allocated partition would this work? If so what is the rule thumb for allocating space for Linux Mint? I have a 250GB disk drive.

TIA
 


I will assume at this point that you are not dual booting. If you are, please tell me.

You are talking about a C: partition....is that just what you are calling it...or is this a dual boot arrangement

Whatever space you give to Linux, it needs to be formatted as ext4, ideally.


A Linux Mint operating system takes about 15GB and grows as you install additional software. If you can spare the size, give it 100GB. Keep most of your free space for the home partition. User data (downloads, videos, pictures) takes a lot more space.
 
You can boot into windows and use windows disk management utilities to shrink C:...leaving the space unallocated. You would then boot your install usb stick and select tghe "install alongside option"
The installer will fine the unallocated space and use it....it will also format that unallocated space appropriately.
 
I have tried installing Linux Mint via a USB stick. Towards the end of the install I get an error message there is insufficient disk space. If I shrink the C: partition to create an un allocated partition would this work? If so what is the rule thumb for allocating space for Linux Mint? I have a 250GB disk drive.

TIA
It sounds like you have windows. you also have a 250G drive. Never thought I'd say this years ago but a 250G drive is pretty small. Linux will have a field day with it if it has all of it. but windows after all the bloat will not leave you much of a drive to use.

I do some small installs and 120G will be very comfortable for linux which gives you room to store stuff. However leaving 130G for windows could be a problem. You may want to get a larger drive if you want both on there. But if you are not using a laptop and you have room for another drive, then use another drive in the computer to run linux. It is always best to put each operating system on its own drive whenever possible. There are also physical components you can install (not on a laptop) to make switching systems fast and easy and reliable. So tell me if you are on laptop or desktop and I will help. Reason for separate drives is windows does not play well with others and often damages the bootup for linux.
 
It sounds like you have windows. you also have a 250G drive. Never thought I'd say this years ago but a 250G drive is pretty small. Linux will have a field day with it if it has all of it. but windows after all the bloat will not leave you much of a drive to use.

I do some small installs and 120G will be very comfortable for linux which gives you room to store stuff. However leaving 130G for windows could be a problem. You may want to get a larger drive if you want both on there. But if you are not using a laptop and you have room for another drive, then use another drive in the computer to run linux. It is always best to put each operating system on its own drive whenever possible. There are also physical components you can install (not on a laptop) to make switching systems fast and easy and reliable. So tell me if you are on laptop or desktop and I will help. Reason for separate drives is windows does not play well with others and often damages the bootup for Linux.
Hello, thanks for the response. I have a laptop. I ordered a larger SSD(500GB). I have not installed it yet. I could replace the SSD I currently have and replace it with the 500GB one to get enough space. Would it possible instead to use the 500GB SSD by connecting it via USB lightning port? How would I get Linux to boot using the external SSD in a encloser setup? Thanks
 
Unless you plan to store 1000's of hours of music, 1000's of photos, or hundreds of hours of video then there is no need for much more than a 250 gb disk for just daily computing, Windows will need at least half that, Linux will need around 25 gb plus storage
 
For a Mint install you would need a minimum of about 30 GBs for the system and another 40 or so for storage. I have a 257 Gb ssd and use the whole thing for Linux no windows. As @Brickwizard has said it is sufficient for day to day computing. Good Luck.
 
we also used to think that a 40 meg hard drive was enough to last a lifetime. Now we would toss it out. Go big. The cost difference from 250 to 500 is negligible. For a laptop you will need to decide if you want windows at all. If not then hold the old drive and you have windows when you want. OTherwise split 250 for windows and 250 for linux and you will be happy and good for a while. And no you can not run an os off the lightning, and you do not have a lightning port on a windows computer. lightning port is strictly apple. I am assuming you do not know the terminology. Be careful about terminology, using the wrong terms will get you the wrong information.
Also you never want to run an OS over a USB port unless you have an emergency or are quite patient for everything to load and run.
 
I installed Ubuntu 24.04 LTS without any problems. I have achieved my goal of only using Windows for running some PC only apps I use. Thanks to all have responded to my post.
 


Latest posts

Top