I don't want to dual boot

I have a few games that for the love of God won't run on Linux. Neither with Wine or Proton. But I don't want to dual boot. What do I do now?
 


kenJackson

Member
You could do what I do.

I installed Windows10 in a QEMU/KVM virtual machine, using virt-install, with it's own LVM2 logical volume for a disk. Best of all, I view it with virt-viewer in it's own virtual console, with no window manager on Linux, so it looks and acts like it's running native.
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
I have a few games that for the love of God won't run on Linux. Neither with Wine or Proton. But I don't want to dual boot. What do I do now?
If you are using a desktop computer and have 2 separate hard drives you can dual boot without problems.

Windows
on one hard drive and Linux on one hard drive and you choose which OS to boot into if you set it up right.

I don't like dual booting on a single drive as each OS should be installed on its own hard drive imo.

Just something to think about.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
What are the names of the games, GardenData? We can take a look.

Seriously, you have nineteen (19) Threads in a little over 6 months, which share one common theme, that you cannot make up your mind.

I understand that, but if these Threads continue, I may have to take them all and combine them under one Thread called perhaps "Linux Beginner - hopelessly confused".

Cheers

Wizard
 

Vrai

Active Member
What are the names of the games, GardenData? We can take a look.

Seriously, you have nineteen (19) Threads in a little over 6 months, which share one common theme, that you cannot make up your mind.

I understand that, but if these Threads continue, I may have to take them all and combine them under one Thread called perhaps "Linux Beginner - hopelessly confused".

Cheers

Wizard
You still didn't say which Linux I should install ! ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Perhaps I should just do like the 'Wiz' and install 'em all :)
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
::pPerhaps I should just do like the 'Wiz' and install 'em all :)

that'll do it !!!
 
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poorguy

Well-Known Member
Hey GardenData61371,


FWIW.

Pick a Linux Distro and use it Linux is Linux the mainstream Linux distros work well and offer great software and support. :)


I'm not a gamer although I do Fight Simulators and for Flight Simulators Windows works the best for me. :)

If you are a gamer than Windows OS is going to be the best choice when it comes to gaming.

I know zero serious real gamers running Linux to game on it just ain't designed for that purpose. o_O

Yes Steam is available for Linux but it ain't the same from what the serious real gamers I know tell me.

Linux is the best for what it is designed for but when it comes down to serious real gaming Windows OS is the best.

Reason being is that games and graphics hardware is designed for Windows OSs and not Linux. :mad:


my coppers worth. :)
 
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rado84

Active Member
I have a few games that for the love of God won't run on Linux. Neither with Wine or Proton. But I don't want to dual boot. What do I do now?
Which are these games, if you don't mind my asking?
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Asked at #6
 

TechnoJunky

Well-Known Member
Most of the games that I've tried on VMWare don't run. Some do, but many don't. Does QEMU/KVM do something different that resolves this?
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member

TechnoJunky

Well-Known Member
Fallout 4 won't run in a VM. Yesterday I tried running Fallout 3 in a VM, it kept looping thru hardware detection. Not sure if that's VM related or something else. I haven't tried running many games that way because I hadn't had good luck with it in the past. But I figured before I could ask that question yesterday, I'd better at least try to run something.
 

Vrai

Active Member
Most of the games that I've tried on VMWare don't run. Some do, but many don't. Does QEMU/KVM do something different that resolves this?
Perhaps different virtual machines operate differently and offer different features - but it seems to me that any virtual machine is adding an 'abstraction' layer between the actual hardware and the software. Usually at a 'cost' of some sort.

Steam and games on Steam in Linux work quite well from what I have been able to gather.

That being said - there may come a time when a user has to make a choice - which is more important - 'that game' or an honest operating system which respects the user?

We all makes choices. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 

TechnoJunky

Well-Known Member
That's true Vrai. I chose Linux quite a while ago, forgoing playing certain games. I'm able to play many more now than I could even a year ago using Steam/Proton. Peer suggested a VM, KenJackson suggested QEMU/KVM. I was just wondering if QEMU/KVM solved some issues that I had seen in the past with running games in a VM.
 

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