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how to use gparted

Discussion in 'General Linux' started by Chris Rachal, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. Chris Rachal

    Chris Rachal Member

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    Hello everyone,


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    I have been doing a lot of research but I'm not crazy experienced with linux mint yet. I installed gparted, but i realized you can resize a mounted partition unless its a live gpart. Could I get dummy instructions from somone on that please? Thanks in advance. Everyone is most helpful here.
     
  2. wizardfromoz

    wizardfromoz Super Moderator
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    We try, I say to my wife "we aim to please, but sometimes we miss the target" :D

    G'day Chris, you lucky dog, you got me again. :rolleyes:

    Basically, you are right. It's a safety feature of GParted, one of my all-time fave tools.

    Partitions are mounted in order for Linux to use them, and they could be:
    • The partition your OS is on, aka / or root
    • The partition, in a UEFI-based PC, is the EFI System Partition (ESP)
    • Your system has a command in place somewhere, that mounts (removable or not) drives automatically
    • Other (means I cannot think of anything)
    If you are looking to work on your root partition, your system is running on it, and so you cannot unmount it, therefore GParted functions such as resize, remove, label, name &c will not work.

    3 ways of getting around this - order is arbitrary -
    1. Have another Linux as well, on your PC, you can use the GParted of one to manipulate partitions on the other and vice-versa (which is what I typically do)
    2. Have a GParted Live USB stick or DVD
    3. Have your original install USB stick, or indeed just about any Linux Distro's install stick that can accommodate GParted (usually already on there, outside of the installer itself), on hand.
    On 1. - You might have Windows x (7, 8 or 10), Linux Mint, and Ubuntu (or try Manjaro for a change of scenery)

    On 2. - GParted Live will fit in a space of less than 500MB (I have it on my first ever USB stick, 512MB and just update it periodically), and so it will also fit on a blank CD if you have one kicking around.

    On 3. - Boot up your Live USB installer stick, and don't start the installer. If you are going to be doing a few operations, you might want to disable in Settings the screensavers and power savers so the screen is on all the time. In the start menu, start to type in

    gparted

    and you'll find it.

    GParted Live is here

    https://gparted.org/livecd.php

    Ask any questions.

    Also see my vid here

    https://www.linux.org/threads/gparted-partitioning-for-linux-read-this-if-you-need-help.22028/

    Any questions, ask here or there, and tell us what you want to do.

    Cheers

    Chris
     
    CptCharis and Rob like this.
  3. Chris Rachal

    Chris Rachal Member

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    So I can have 3 OS systems on my laptop?
     
  4. wizardfromoz

    wizardfromoz Super Moderator
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    Take a look at the pic below, which will answer your question ... and then pick your jaw back up off the ground :)


    [​IMG]

    SCREENSHOT 1 - WIZARD'S TYPICAL LAPTOP SETUP

    I have a couple of chores to run, and I will be back with more detail.

    Cheers

    Wiz
     
    CptCharis likes this.
  5. Chris Rachal

    Chris Rachal Member

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    I bow down to you now lol. I just installed ubontu. Its way different than mint. I have to figure out where the update manager is due to the same issue with mint where i just needed to do a new kernal for my wifi to work. I love the many options. I will have to get back on tomorrow. Cheers.
     
    wizardfromoz likes this.
  6. wizardfromoz

    wizardfromoz Super Moderator
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    No worries, sing out if you need help :D

    Wizard
     
  7. Chris Rachal

    Chris Rachal Member

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    So, I tried to upgrade the kernal using the uku. I installed it and went to install the lastest kernal they have. It then tells me to reboot which i did, but I can't boot ubuntu, it says the kernal needs to load first. I went to the advanced options and I clicked on the latest kernal there and got the same message. Oh boy.
     
  8. wizardfromoz

    wizardfromoz Super Moderator
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    This would almost beg the question

    WHY???

    ...except that I am acquainted with your history, and so can understand a bit of your (quite reasonable) thought processes.

    A short analogy on Kiwis (New Zealanders) and Aussies:

    An American might think that we sound the same. We do, but we don't. An Aussie can always tell a Kiwi from the moment the mouth is opened, and likewise them with us.

    Similar but different.

    In Linux terms, "they", the so-called pundits, and some well-meaning people, may tell you that "This works on Ubuntu, and Mint is based on Ubuntu, so it should work with Mint".

    Not always the case, and quite frequently, the contrary.

    In Mint, you can type and enter, in Terminal

    Code:
    blkid
    and get output straight away. In Ubuntu, you must preface it with

    Code:
    sudo
    .

    Having been a Mint user yourself, you are likely aware that with Updates, some come from Mint itself, and some from the Ubuntu Repositories.

    So the kernels issue, with or without the use of Ukuu (from Tony George's stable of utilities) may not be as straightforward as it seems, to provide a remedy for wifi issues for you.

    DO BE AWARE, though, Chris, that we are straying somewhat off-topic with this material, in a Thread that is titled about GParted.

    You could

    1. Start a new Thread
    2. Append/update your previous WiFi Thread
    3. Other (which means I can't think of other)
    That way, we help The Viewers as well as yourself, and Helpers can provide input better.

    Think about it, and if you need help moving stuff from Point A to Point B I or another Mod will assist.

    Cheers

    Chris
     

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