How many times?

Swerved

New Member
How many times did you hop from distro to distro in order to find out what was the best for you. I can't seem to resist the urge of finding one that's just a little better for me than what I'm using (Mint 19.2 - Cinnamon).. The more I learn the more I want to bounce around. I've been sticking mainly with Debian based for right now, particularly with my Surface Pro.. Been trying to stick with lightweight distros, though it runs Mint just fine.

On my desktop I have a little more flexibility.

So, just curious how long did that urge to jump around stick with you, or are you still looking for the next best thing?
 


poorguy

Well-Known Member
How many times did you hop from distro to distro in order to find out what was the best for you. I can't seem to resist the urge of finding one that's just a little better for me than what I'm using (Mint 19.2 - Cinnamon).. The more I learn the more I want to bounce around.
This is quite normal imo.
If one never searches than one never finds and one never knows imo.
I've been sticking mainly with Debian based for right now, particularly with my Surface Pro.. Been trying to stick with lightweight distros, though it runs Mint just fine.

On my desktop I have a little more flexibility.
If you like the Debian based / built Linux Distros than have a look at these.





So, just curious how long did that urge to jump around stick with you, or are you still looking for the next best thing?
I've used quite a few different Linux Distros and they all work well on my old desktops.

From the system resource hungry mainstream flagships to the small footprint lightweight Linux Distros.

The only differences I found were resource usage and user interface and one Linux Distro wasn't any better than another Linux Distro.

I can find something wrong with every Linux Distro I've tried or I've used or I'm using now.

Certain Linux Distros work better with certain computers and their hardware and the trick is to match the Linux Distro to the computer and hardware it is going to be installed on and used on.

I install and use OOTB and add very little extras and very rarely have any problems.


Linux Distros I use installed on separate desktops.

Ubuntu / Debian based / built.
Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver
Peppermint 9.
Peppermint 10.

Debian based / built.
LMDE 3 Cindy.
Antix 17.4.1 Helen Keller.
 

Swerved

New Member
This is quite normal imo.
If one never searches than one never finds and one never knows imo.

If you like the Debian based / built Linux Distros than have a look at these.






I've used quite a few different Linux Distros and they all work well on my old desktops.

From the system resource hungry mainstream flagships to the small footprint lightweight Linux Distros.

The only differences I found were resource usage and user interface and one Linux Distro wasn't any better than another Linux Distro.

I can find something wrong with every Linux Distro I've tried or I've used or I'm using now.

Certain Linux Distros work better with certain computers and their hardware and the trick is to match the Linux Distro to the computer and hardware it is going to be installed on and used on.

I install and use OOTB and add very little extras and very rarely have any problems.


Linux Distros I use installed on separate desktops.

Ubuntu / Debian based / built.
Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver
Peppermint 9.
Peppermint 10.

Debian based / built.
LMDE 3 Cindy.
Antix 17.4.1 Helen Keller.
Great answer.. I have toyed around with MX Linux on my desktop computer and I am intrigued by it. May take a closer look. I haven't tried Anti-X yet. I also looked at PopOS for my surface, but it feels too much like Android (not that there's anything wrong with it). Xubuntu seems to work really well.
 

Vrai

Active Member
I would guess literally hundreds of times. But it was not always to find a "best" distro, often it was just for fun! I am curious and just wanted to see what the various distros were like and what they had to offer. Sometimes it was for a learning experience - like installing Gentoo or a Debian Net install or a BSD install. After about 6 or 7 years I settled down but I still like to install a new version of various distros.
Yep, hundreds :cool:
 

Alexzee

Active Member
Tried a lot of distributions over the last 8 years.
Finally stopped distro hopping after a year and stuck with Slackware as my main distro.

Sticking with Debian, Slackware and MX Linux.
Of the 3 MX Linux is the easiest to run.

If you are still distro hopping give Virtual Box a spin. It's easier than performing fresh installs.
 

Swerved

New Member
I got MX installed on my Surface Pro. I had to make a few adjustments for the high dpi screen but I think that will be what I use on that device from now on. My desktop machines are still on Mint 19.2 and I probably won't change that for a while, at least not until I have a little more time under my belt with linux.

Either way Windows is a thing of the past. I booted into it today to make the MX USB stick I used for the install (for some reason it wouldn't work when I made it through linux) and I just sat there.. waiting for it to do "stuff" before it was even usable. I found myself wondering how anyone can even stand to use Windows anymore.. I feel free and enlightened. :)
 

blackneos940

Active Member
I got MX installed on my Surface Pro. I had to make a few adjustments for the high dpi screen but I think that will be what I use on that device from now on. My desktop machines are still on Mint 19.2 and I probably won't change that for a while, at least not until I have a little more time under my belt with linux.

Either way Windows is a thing of the past. I booted into it today to make the MX USB stick I used for the install (for some reason it wouldn't work when I made it through linux) and I just sat there.. waiting for it to do "stuff" before it was even usable. I found myself wondering how anyone can even stand to use Windows anymore.. I feel free and enlightened. :)
I still use Windows for certain things... :) I installed an SSD and have Windows, Ubuntu and FreeBSD on it, and Windows runs fine. But, it's kind of sad to have an OS so badly optimized that you need to run it on an SSD to have good performance. :\
 

Swerved

New Member
I still use Windows for certain things... :) I installed an SSD and have Windows, Ubuntu and FreeBSD on it, and Windows runs fine. But, it's kind of sad to have an OS so badly optimized that you need to run it on an SSD to have good performance. :\
Yeah I keep a drive with it installed for those "just in case" situations I may not have anticipated. I've just been so spoiled since the change over to this side.
 

ReginaBob

New Member
How many times did you hop from distro to distro in order to find out what was the best for you. I can't seem to resist the urge of finding one that's just a little better for me than what I'm using (Mint 19.2 - Cinnamon).. The more I learn the more I want to bounce around. I've been sticking mainly with Debian based for right now, particularly with my Surface Pro.. Been trying to stick with lightweight distros, though it runs Mint just fine.

On my desktop I have a little more flexibility.

So, just curious how long did that urge to jump around stick with you, or are you still looking for the next best thing?
Well,I tried Zorin first,because it looks just like Windows 7;then I tried Peppermint,Mint,maybe one or two others,before I found out that they were all based on Ubuntu.So I tried Ubuntu.Discovered that all my dual monitor woes went away.Now I mostly leave Ubuntu (18.04LTS) on the tower,and when the hopping urge hits me,I get out the old laptop and play.Trouble is my old brain gets confused easily,so lately I've been running Ubuntu on the laptop too.It's just new enough that I don't really need to run a "light" distro on it(with the help of an SSD and 4GB RAM).Hmmm.Getting bored today.Wonder what's new on Distrowatch........
 

Swerved

New Member
Yeah the laptop is now the hopping machine for me as well.. However, I think the urge has subsided for a while once I got MX set up on it. I'm going to stay with this one for a while.. at least until tomorrow or so... lol
 

mudz

Gold Member
Gold Supporter
I have some more learning to do first.
This universal quote has postponed so many of my projects for indefinite time, which I should have started earlier. :confused:

I've changed my mindset now, if I want to learn something I'll immediately make a goal project and start working on it. I've stopped following a book first to gather all the knowledge I can and then moving forward for a project. I remember once I took a project thesis which requires a program to be made to detect gold in a mine. I knew python would be a great choice for that project but I only knew few basics things about it, but I took the project anyways knowing I'll learn python by doing it. Believe me it only took me 2 days and I was able to do my task perfectly all by myself. I learnt so many new things in the process.

Thing is, just make a final goal & start working on it. Divide your project in several parts, make outlines of each part. these several parts will be small goals, work on them.

Don't be afraid to start working on it immediately, if you fail on one task you will learn a lot of things, it will be helpful in debugging too because you'll know now which error corresponds to what, also you will be able to teach others when they got the same error.

If you succeed rewards are high because once you thought "I can never do that without all the knowledge on this thing"

" Errors Maketh Developer "
 

Swerved

New Member
This universal quote has postponed so many of my projects for indefinite time, which I should have started earlier. :confused:

I've changed my mindset now, if I want to learn something I'll immediately make a goal project and start working on it. I've stopped following a book first to gather all the knowledge I can and then moving forward for a project. I remember once I took a project thesis which requires a program to be made to detect gold in a mine. I knew python would be a great choice for that project but I only knew few basics things about it, but I took the project anyways knowing I'll learn python by doing it. Believe me it only took me 2 days and I was able to do my task perfectly all by myself. I learnt so many new things in the process.

Thing is, just make a final goal & start working on it. Divide your project in several parts, make outlines of each part. these several parts will be small goals, work on them.

Don't be afraid to start working on it immediately, if you fail on one task you will learn a lot of things, it will be helpful in debugging too because you'll know now which error corresponds to what, also you will be able to teach others when they got the same error.

If you succeed rewards are high because once you thought "I can never do that without all the knowledge on this thing"

" Errors Maketh Developer "
Generally this is my mindset as well. Most of the skills I have picked up over the years have been from a somewhat spark of spontaneous interest, or out of necessity (work).. As for Linux, I have been taking it slow. So many different things to learn on so many levels. I've only been using it a month or two so far and already I feel pretty comfortable, or at least to the point of not using that suffocating slow motion train wreck of an OS that I dare not even call by name.

I did have someone ask me how I learned to use Linux.. My answer was, "By breaking it a bunch of times".
 

Swerved

New Member
Well,I tried Zorin first,because it looks just like Windows 7;then I tried Peppermint,Mint,maybe one or two others,before I found out that they were all based on Ubuntu.So I tried Ubuntu.Discovered that all my dual monitor woes went away.Now I mostly leave Ubuntu (18.04LTS) on the tower,and when the hopping urge hits me,I get out the old laptop and play.Trouble is my old brain gets confused easily,so lately I've been running Ubuntu on the laptop too.It's just new enough that I don't really need to run a "light" distro on it(with the help of an SSD and 4GB RAM).Hmmm.Getting bored today.Wonder what's new on Distrowatch........
Same here.. My laptop is actually a Surface Pro 5th generation.. 4 gigs of ram, 128Gb SSD, and a little 4-core Intel processor.. Was barely enough for it's native OS, but when I put MX Linux on it, it came alive... I use it way more than my desktop machines (they run Mint)...
 

mudz

Gold Member
Gold Supporter
Generally this is my mindset as well. Most of the skills I have picked up over the years have been from a somewhat spark of spontaneous interest, or out of necessity (work).. As for Linux, I have been taking it slow. So many different things to learn on so many levels. I've only been using it a month or two so far and already I feel pretty comfortable, or at least to the point of not using that suffocating slow motion train wreck of an OS that I dare not even call by name.

I did have someone ask me how I learned to use Linux.. My answer was, "By breaking it a bunch of times".
This will help you http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/ !!

Good Luck
 

Members online


Top