How can I dual boot Linux and Windows?

Zactlx

New Member
Just installed Linux Mint xmse
Very lightweigth but lacks many things
And Its very confusing to do activity that I usually do on windows because most things needs to be done by Command

So I wanted to dual boot windows 7/10 and Linux Mint but I don't know how.
In windows OS when I download windows 10 from Microsoft website it will give an Exe file but in Linux it gave me an Iso file

If I tried to download windows 7,when I submit my product key in the microsoft website an Error will show up and stated that my laptop is pre installed with windows 7
This is true but my Windows 7 was broken(blue screen hard disk corrupt) so I have to install Linux from a bootable usb and Now im trying to install windows 7 back but I don't know how
 


wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter

Zactlx

New Member
Ouch :eek:

I take it you do not have an original install disk for Win 7, nor a Recovery Disk made by you?

Not so good, but water under the bridge.

Have you tried to download the Windows 7 .iso from here

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows7

... and then use the product key?

Wizard
To download Windows 7
I need to enter my product key which will result in an error

Weirdly enough to download windows 10 I don't need a product key
But my Usb stick isn't large enough for windows 10 so I have to use a disk if I choose to go with windows 10 or
I could download some older windows version(xp/vista)and install it into my laptop then install a newer version into my laptop
But how can I do that?
 

Zactlx

New Member
Just discovered the USB image writer but apparently it doesn't work when ever I write the iso into my usb and booted the laptop using usb it will always goes into linux mint
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
My bad, I misread paragraphs 2 and 3 :oops:

Mate what is your personal data situation? Stuff you can't afford to lose.

I would not allow an internet connection on either of XP (support ended April 2014) nor Vista (support ended April 2017), but that is your choice.

You could put The Dozer 10 on and then dualboot with Linux, but it's that data part that is important to you.

Wiz

BTW I have to be out of here soon (Saturday evening in Oz), but there are others to help, and I'll look in when I can :)

Avagudweegend
 

Zactlx

New Member
My bad, I misread paragraphs 2 and 3 :oops:

Mate what is your personal data situation? Stuff you can't afford to lose.

I would not allow an internet connection on either of XP (support ended April 2014) nor Vista (support ended April 2017), but that is your choice.

You could put The Dozer 10 on and then dualboot with Linux, but it's that data part that is important to you.

Wiz

BTW I have to be out of here soon (Saturday evening in Oz), but there are others to help, and I'll look in when I can :)

Avagudweegend
No data to be loss
Can I install windows from Dozer 10?
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Bulldozer, Dozer, Windows 10 - same thing.

Gotta go

Wiz
 

Fishy

Active Member
I am at work right now using my phone to post this. Soon as I get home I'll get the link to a thing I found for writing to a USB to make it a bootable format.
The COOL thing about it like all other Linux stuff it is Open Source - I've been using it to write to USB all kinds of stuff.
Super Super easy to use for big monkey fingers like me with old bad eyes.
 

Fishy

Active Member
This is link to what I stumbled across while looking at this thing called Linux " USB Installer 1986 "

https://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/

I found it to be helpful with correcting how to write to USB or DVD to install any Linux Distro I wanted, but also Windows bootable install of ( Vista / 7 / 8 / 10 ) which I though was kind of cool.
I have been using it to write 1 Linux Distro after another to stick on my laptop and take it for a test drive - to see what the laptop could run, it likes and dislikes. It allowed me to crash the laptop get another version of Linux stick the ISO on the USB plug it in and run it to see what happened. The laptop is bone stock which I will be bring it back to Linux Mint Cinnamon 19.1 since that is what a couple of guys close are running.
I to am total new to all things Linux.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
I came down the hole and saw a Rabbit with an Odd Hat he came this way ..........
I wonder where he might have gone.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
just to give you a second source......

**How to install/try Linux Mint on your Windows PC**

First, you can -- __and should__ -- try Linux Mint before switching to it. Fortunately, unlike other operating systems, Linux distros like Mint make it easy to give them a test run before installing it.

First you'll need to download a copy of Linux Mint, which comes with three different desktops: MATE, Xfce, and its default desktop, Cinnamon. If you have a 2012-or-newer PC, I recommend you download the 64-bit version of Mint with Cinnamon and multi-media support.

If you don't have an __ISO burner program__, download one. I recommend freeware programs ImgBurn for optical drives and Yumi for Windows for USB sticks. Other good choices are LinuxLive USB Creator and UNetbootin. These are also free programs.

((( I use unetbootin. I download the iso file separately....I don't use unetbootin to download it for me. I then use the are at the bottom of the unetbootin window to locate the iso on my pc, select the USB stick to write it to....select 4gb of persistence (so that after a reboot most/all the changes i have made will still be there)....and away we go !)))


**Giving Mint a try**

Once you've installed the burner program and have the latest Linux Mint ISO file in hand, use the burner to put the ISO image to your disc or USB stick. If you're using a DVD -- __Mint is too big to fit on a CD__ -- check your newly burned disc for errors. Over the years, I've had more __problems with running Linux and installing Linux from DVDs__ from bad discs than all other causes combined.

You can set it up a USB stick with persistent storage. With this, you can store your programs and files on the stick. This way you can carry Linux and use it as a walk-around operating system for hotel, conference, and library PCs. I've found this to be very handy and there's always at least one Linux stick in my laptop bag.

**Next, you place your disc or USB stick into your PC and reboot**. During the reboot, stop the boot-up process and get to your PC's UEFI or BIOS settings. How you do this varies according to the system.

Look for a message as the machine starts up that tells which key or keys you'll need to press in order to get to the BIOS or UEFI. Likely candidates are a function key or the "esc" or "delete" keys. __If you don't spot it the first time, don't worry about it. Just reboot and try again.__


Once you get to the BIOS or UEFI, look for a menu choice labeled "Boot," "Boot Options," or "Boot Order." If you don't see anything with the word "boot" in it, check other menu options such as "Advanced Options," "Advanced BIOS Features," or "Other Options." Once you find it, set the boot order so that instead of booting from the hard drive first, you boot from either the CD/DVD drive or from a USB drive.

Once your PC is set to try to boot first from the alternative drive, insert your DVD or USB stick and reboot. __Then, select "Start Linux Mint" from the first menu. And, from there, you'll be running Linux Mint.__

Some Nvidia graphics cards don't work well with Mint's open-source driver. If Linux Mint freezes during boot, use the "nomodeset" boot option. You set this to the Start Linux Mint option and press __'e'__ to modify the boot options. Then, replace "quiet splash" with "nomodeset" and press F10 to boot. On older PCs using BIOS, press 'tab' instead of 'e.'

__MINT WILL RUN SLOWER THIS WAY, BUT IT WILL BOOT AND RUN__. If you decide to install Mint, you can permanently fix the problem with the following steps:

Run the Driver Manager
Choose the NVIDIA drivers and wait for them to be installed
Reboot the computer

SO **FAR YOU HAVEN'T INSTALLED ANYTHING ON YOUR PC, BUT YOU WILL BE RUNNING LINUX MINT. USE THIS OPPORTUNITY TO PLAY WITH IT TO SEE IF YOU LIKE IT..**

Using a DVD drive Mint will run slowly, but it will run quickly enough to give you an idea of what it's like to use Mint. With a USB stick, it runs fast enough to give you a good notion of what working with Mint is like.

P__LEASE...play with it...explore everywhere....you CANNOT break it...remember it is on a thumb drive....if it goes up in smoke, just reboot and away you go again. No harm done.__

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 

9daemon

New Member
Just forget windows if you're not going to lose any data. Linux is the future of computing anyway. If you're comfortable using the command line on something like OSX you could just use the dd utility. You don't strike me as being comfortable with the command line so I'll give you an easier option. Go download and install etcher https://www.balena.io/etcher/. Then just select the image and the drive you want to write to.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Etcher is a good call :) for a one-time burn, and they are talking about incorporating Persistence into it in the future.

We first noticed it here around middle 2018 and a number of us have used it with good results. Its surge in popularity is such that Manjaro have now incorporated it into their Repositories.

Etcher, like Unetbootin mentioned in Brian's Spoiler, is cross-platform, so you can use it from Windows or from Linux.

Wizard
 

Fishy

Active Member
I gave up on it after I got a second blue screen trying to get the Win 10 install to play well with the Linux install.
I just wipe both of my systems of windows installed Mint Cinnamon on Laptop - seems to like it, runs very well for a simple laptop.
Desktop PC - I just said to heck with trying to get the dual boot set-up to work after many attempts with Win 10 / works fine with multiple installs of different Linux distros. I went back to a single fresh install of Kubuntu at the moment on the desktop PC. The Desktop PC runs very quick with Linux actually better then it ever did with Microsoft on it. As a new Linux user as in I have less then a month under my belt as of this posting on Linux. I have found the use of Kubuntu for newbie to get it set up and running to be easier at least for me to see and understand what is suppose to happen versus some of the other Linux Distros.

I am using the Linux Kubuntu KDE which came pre-setup with Plasma 5 on my Desktop PC / Ex-win 7 then updated to Win 10 ran very slow, very laggy and glitchy.
The only deciding factor for me was I wanted to try out the Plasma , I tried twice running Plasma on Mint Cinnamon it would lock up on the Mint install.
 

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