HOLY....BLEEP!

mrcrossroads

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Just speced out a System 76 Oryx Pro with all upgrades included. It comes to $4,574 before tax! Holy freaking flip!


oryx.png



Just can't wait to see what the Kuda comes out to.
 


You've got a lot deeper pockets than most! :)
 
o_O I don't believe I've paid that much for all the desktops I've owned.
 
I don't think our first company mainframe cost that, and it filled a 12x10 ft air-conditioned room [about 1967]
 
What can it do that my PC can't ?
 
The specs look great, but I can't stand a numeric keypad on a laptop --it makes me work slanted.

It's one of those things that I see as a no-no, all wrong
 
Nice hardware but if you buy your hardware from a regular vendor it will probably cost you a lot less for the same setup because everything is more expensive when you order it from System76. What are you planning to do with your system, running it as a vm host, Plex server, another server function or compiling Linux kernels from source. If not for one of those tasks or something similar that is way overkill for a desktop system. If you are able to spend $50,000 on a new laptop and a new desktop, I'm sure you can afford a "Gold Supporter" membership for linux.org
 
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Gold Supporter....good point !
 
lol!

My "best" computer cost £30 (Approx. $40).

I noticed USB3 connectors and Windows 10 Professional Licence.

Got it home. Clean as a whistle inside. Discovered 250Gb SSD and 1Tb HDD.

Asked for 3x8Gb RAM for Christmas. Now runs 32Gb of RAM.
 
I've been looking for a laptop that can reliably run ubuntu, my requirements are simple:

A sturdy build with a solid keyboard.

Easily replaceable battery and the ability to run with the battery disconnected if necessary.

A 15" or bigger matte screen with reasonable brightness.

No need for a dedicated GPU.

Yet that doesn't seem to exist. Every laptop out there in that category seems made to be tossed in the bin after ~3 years or so of use.

Then you see a $46,000 computer with "1 year limited parts and labor warranty" and you understand that the entire industry is broken.
 
I've been looking for a laptop that can reliably run ubuntu, my requirements are simple:

A sturdy build with a solid keyboard.

Easily replaceable battery and the ability to run with the battery disconnected if necessary.

A 15" or bigger matte screen with reasonable brightness.

No need for a dedicated GPU.

Yet that doesn't seem to exist. Every laptop out there in that category seems made to be tossed in the bin after ~3 years or so of use.

Then you see a $46,000 computer with "1 year limited parts and labor warranty" and you understand that the entire industry is broken.
If you can settle for a 14" screen I would look for a refurbished Lenovo Thinkpad I have the T450 runs Ubuntu and deritives just fine and only cost about $300.00 US. They have a good keyboard and are rugged. newegg
 
If you can settle for a 14" screen I would look for a refurbished Lenovo Thinkpad I have the T450 runs Ubuntu and deritives just fine and only cost about $300.00 US. They have a good keyboard and are rugged. newegg
I'm in Europe, where the market for refurbished/second-hand laptops is perhaps not as developed. I've seen those listed on amazon.de for about 500€ and they probably come with a QWERTZ keyboard (no way to check). In any case it's an indication of our sad state of affairs that we're looking at 5-6 year old machines and saying "dang, I wish they still made those!"

Edit: one reviewer on amazon commented that he received a unit with a US ANSI keyboard, so those are probably US imports, hence the higher price than what you'd pay at newegg.
 
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sad state of affairs that we're looking at 5-6 year old machines and saying "dang
For daily computing [not gaming] these machines make Ideal Linux boxes, they are new enough to be moderately quick but old enough that with few exceptions all the necessary Linux drivers are available
[I am currently looking at one of these, https://www.laptopsdirect.co.uk/ref...b-15.6-inch-windows-10-l-tr-32468/version.asp
but I will not pay that price, I will re-furb it myself when I find one at the right price]
 
For daily computing [not gaming] these machines make Ideal Linux boxes, they are new enough to be moderately quick but old enough that with few exceptions all the necessary Linux drivers are available
[I am currently looking at one of these, https://www.laptopsdirect.co.uk/ref...b-15.6-inch-windows-10-l-tr-32468/version.asp
but I will not pay that price, I will re-furb it myself when I find one at the right price]

I've heard that elsewhere as well. If you install Linux on bleeding edge hardware you'll probably going to have a hard time getting all the drivers you need.

I also had a relative who a couple years back made the mistake of buying one of those HP laptops brand new. Then she was complaining that it was dog slow, as it came with a old-school HDD. I opened the thing to replace it with an SSD, and I can tell you that HP doesn't want anyone inside those machines. You have to unglue rubber feet to get to the opening screws and then detach some very fiddly plastic clips with an old credit card to access the internals. I guess if you pay peanuts for an old one you can be at ease to do whatever, but at full retail price the intervention was a little tense.
 
I opened the thing to replace it with an SSD, and I can tell you that HP doesn't want anyone inside those machines.
not just HP
when my daughter gave me her acer ZG5 that would not boot her words were, her stepson [in his 20s] could not fix it, so I had no chance, it came with puppy,
when I got home [took about half hour] and plugged it in, i imitately spotted it was a password problem, so with a quick sudo -sudo-su, I had the password changed and working, so in less than an hour I had phoned her and said … what's the problem it works fine, so she said keep it,
I still use it for travelling, but I had to upgrade It, never having worked on one I set up the dining room table with plates saucers all with labels of where the bits came from, I discovered it was missing about 8 screws [lucky i had spares the right size] but when it was spread out on the table I had 3 parts for the case and 128 individual parts cables and screws to go back. Since that I decided Laptops were easy and started repairing them as well as boxes.
 
I should count my blessings and be thankful I kept my old Windows XP desktop and Windows Vista desktop and Windows 7 desktop.

I pulled them out of the closet when trying out Linux and each one worked flawless without any driver problems.

They are old but they run Linux very well.
 
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