Hello Linux Nerds

Hello world...

this is the third forum I have joined. The first one was about a car and the second ons about a computer game.

I am Rainer, 57, German, having learned some UNIX in a course and used it a bit (6 months) at work as a normal user. I have a university degree in computer-science and was working as an IT-specialist for more than 30 years.

Privately, I've used only Windows-PCs and Mac. I really believe that with using mainstream stuff you don't do anything wrong and consequently I tried to stay away from the Linux world.

Currently, I need to buy new hardware and I am considering to get a new desktop with Linux (probably Ubuntu because I don't hear too many complaints... again, my mainstream thinking) installed. If I would choose to do so, I will probably become a pretty active member of this forum and I am looking forward to get in contact with other nerds to exchange ideas.
Welcome Rainer greetings from Germany :) .
 


iu
 
Welcome to Linux.org-:)

Like Brickwizard said, why limit yourself.

The beauty of trying Linux is you can use a virtual machine and try all the Linux distro's you'd like to help you decide which one you want to install. OR> run Linux Live on a thumb drive.


 
G'day @rAIner-linux from DownUnder (Australia) and welcome to linux.org :)



Fortunately the makers and operators of the world's top 500 supercomputers don't agree, and run Linux, as do most of the Web Servers of most of the largest websites in the world, but perhaps you already know that.

When I was your age, I made the decision to stop using Windows (7) in favour of Linux, which I had been using intermittently for 4 years prior, and I have never looked back.

Although I have had computers such as HP, Compaq, Asus and other, I keep coming back to Dell, because it is so Linux-friendly and reliable.

In any event, we look forward to engaging with you in your journey.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 
Hi, in the meantime I became a Linux user, i.e I am using Linux Mint Cinnamon as an alternate boot option on my old Windows notebook. My HW bottleneck currently is non-volatile memory... so SSD, or HDD. I only have about 50 GB of SSD space left, but I am going to connect an external USB 16TB HDD.I am a programmer... so, I want to control computers. I am planning to use this external 16TB HDD for all of my devices (Mac, Android, Windows...) or in other words a private cloud.

(this is my first forum post under my own Linux Mint installation... yes, as of now I am one of yours)

As a mainstream lover I was using mainly the Internet Explorer and later Edge to browse the internet, It seems that Mint included Firefox or at least is suggesting it. So I should get used to it and consequently install firefox as my default browser in all of my devices. Do you agree?
 
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Hi, in the meantime I became a Linux user, i.e I am using Linux Mint Cinnamon as an alternate boot option on my old Windows notebook. My HW bottleneck currently is non-volatile memory... so SSD, or HDD. I only have about 50 GB of SSD space left, but I am going to connect an external USB 16TB HDD.I am a programmer... so, I want to control computers. I am planning to use this external 16TB HDD for all of my devices (Mac, Android, Windows...) or in other words a private cloud.

(this is my first forum post under my own Linux Mint installation... yes, as of now I am one of yours)

As a mainstream lover I was using mainly the Internet Explorer and later Edge to browse the internet, It seems that Mint included Firefox or at least is suggesting it. So I should get used to it and consequently install firefox as my default browser in all of my devices. Do you agree?
As far as browsers go it's your choice. Firefox is a good open source one. I tend to use vivaldi most of the time because it is based on Chrome. And works the way I like. But as you mentioned which ever one you choose learn it well and be consistent across all of your OS's That would be my advise. And above all enjoy the journey!
 
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Actually, it is affordability. I am planning to build a fileserver for my home network. And it seems that a Linux solution would be the most cost effective and on top of that, I will have better control over the system.
I have somewhat recently played with NFS in Debian Linux. It is what you'll need for your file server. Please let me know if you need some tips.

Signed,

Matthew Campbell
 
If it's controlling multiple systems that you're after, never underestimate ssh. If that's local control you might look into a KVM switch.

Signed,

Matthew Campbell
 
As a mainstream lover I was using mainly the Internet Explorer and later Edge to browse the internet, It seems that Mint included Firefox or at least is suggesting it. So I should get used to it and consequently install firefox as my default browser in all of my devices. Do you agree?
The choice of browser is something of a personal one, though Linux is well-served in this respect. We're kinda spoilt for choice.

The drawback with browsers, for most folks, is that for each distro you have to install the browser from scratch again. In years gone by this meant maintaining bookmarks and stuff like that, since you would end up with stuff in one browser install that wasn't in the others. Then "sync" arrived, which made keeping everything identical much, much easier!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~​

I'm not keen on "sync". Google's syncing is too nosey, and Mozilla's seems a bit haphazard for my liking. So instead, for Puppy we developed our own version of the Windoze 'portable' apps (which also keeps all config stuff within the app directory, too)......initially, browsers and stuff like Thunderbird, then soon followed by portable versions of no end of other applications.

In this sense, 'portable' means you can run each item from outside the OS itself.......and because of this, it's entirely possible to 'share' an item between several OSes. This also cuts down on app duplication and overall waste of drive space. This way, I've achieved my own "syncing", and the beauty of this approach is that the data all remains 'local', and under the user's control.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~​

The system works very well for us here in Puppy Linux, due to Puppy's somewhat unique and slightly 'oddball' approach to things.....running in a virtual filesystem in RAM, loaded-in from read-only system files in squash format, and possessing the ability to run several Puppies from individual sub-directories within a given partition.

I somehow doubt it would be that successful in mainstream distros, however.


Mike. ;)
 
The choice of browser is something of a personal one, though Linux is well-served in this respect. We're kinda spoilt for choice.

The drawback with browsers, for most folks, is that for each distro you have to install the browser from scratch again. In years gone by this meant maintaining bookmarks and stuff like that, since you would end up with stuff in one browser install that wasn't in the others. Then "sync" arrived, which made keeping everything identical much, much easier!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~​

I'm not keen on "sync". Google's syncing is too nosey, and Mozilla's seems a bit haphazard for my liking. So instead, for Puppy we developed our own version of the Windoze 'portable' apps (which also keeps all config stuff within the app directory, too)......initially, browsers and stuff like Thunderbird, then soon followed by portable versions of no end of other applications.

In this sense, 'portable' means you can run each item from outside the OS itself.......and because of this, it's entirely possible to 'share' an item between several OSes. This also cuts down on app duplication and overall waste of drive space. This way, I've achieved my own "syncing", and the beauty of this approach is that the data all remains 'local', and under the user's control.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~​

The system works very well for us here in Puppy Linux, due to Puppy's somewhat unique and slightly 'oddball' approach to things.....running in a virtual filesystem in RAM, loaded-in from read-only system files in squash format, and possessing the ability to run several Puppies from individual sub-directories within a given partition.

I somehow doubt it would be that successful in mainstream distros, however.


Mike. ;)
Bookmarks can be exported to a file and then imported into another browser. I exported them from one copy of the Tor browser that I was using and imported them into another copy for another user and was back up and running in no time. It was fast and easy. It's all the rest that can take a while. Setting the order on the bar on top, like reload, home, bookmarks, add-ons, and such. If you use this method the bookmarks are in a file in your own computer and never shared with some tech company.

Signed,

Matthew Campbell
 
Hi, in the meantime I became a Linux user, i.e I am using Linux Mint Cinnamon as an alternate boot option on my old Windows notebook. My HW bottleneck currently is non-volatile memory... so SSD, or HDD. I only have about 50 GB of SSD space left, but I am going to connect an external USB 16TB HDD.I am a programmer... so, I want to control computers. I am planning to use this external 16TB HDD for all of my devices (Mac, Android, Windows...) or in other words a private cloud.

(this is my first forum post under my own Linux Mint installation... yes, as of now I am one of yours)

As a mainstream lover I was using mainly the Internet Explorer and later Edge to browse the internet, It seems that Mint included Firefox or at least is suggesting it. So I should get used to it and consequently install firefox as my default browser in all of my devices. Do you agree?
Greetings @rAlner-linux and welcome,
I remember when I was 57. Let me see now, that was 32 years ago-wow, how time flies!
I am using LM 21.3 MATE on my main machine. However, I have tried about 20 - 25 different distros in the past 9 years. (I am not a computer wiz but am inquisitive)
My guess is that you will soon be a Linux wiz, as I detect a willingness to learn in you.
As an aside, I have used Canon printers and scanners for the past several years (currently using 2500series Pixma). They are my choice for being trouble free with Linux.
I am half German so there is some connection with you (my wife is full-blown German), and I have a golf partner who migrated from Germany to USA when he was 17 (now 82).
As most here will say - enjoy your Linux journey!!!
Old Geezer
Tango Charlie
 


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